Thomasia grandiflora

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Thomasia grandiflora
Thomasia grandiflora 1187.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae
Genus: Thomasia
Species:
T. grandiflora
Binomial name
Thomasia grandiflora

Thomasia grandiflora, commonly known as large-flowered thomasia, [2] is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. The flowers are pinkish-purple with a papery appearance hanging in pendents from the leaf axils. The calyx lobes are prominent and larger than the petals.

Contents

Description

Thomasia grandiflora is a small shrub that grows to about 1 m (3 ft 3 in) high and wide. The dark, bright green leaves vary in shape, usually heart-shaped or occasionally narrowly elliptic, slightly flexible, leathery and 15–25 mm (0.59–0.98 in) long. The flowers have wide, conspicuous, pinkish-purple calyx lobes that are more prominent than the petals. The calyx is thicker near the mid-vein. The small petals are densely covered with star-shaped hairs, occasionally with only a few scattered hairs. The flowers have a papery texture and about 2 cm (0.79 in) across on short pendant stalks. The flowers are followed by capsules containing black seeds that are shed from the plant when ripe. Flowering occurs from winter to spring. [3] [4] [5]

Taxonomy and naming

Thomasia grandiflora was first formally described by botanist John Lindley in 1839 who published the description in A sketch of the vegetation of the Swan River Colony in 1839. [6] [7] The specific epithet (grandiflora) is from the Latin grandis meaning "large" or "great" [8] :378 and flos meaning "flower" [8] :338 referring to the large flowers of the species. [5]

Distribution and habitat

Large-flowered tomasia is a widespread species, mostly near coastal locations growing in open forest in the south-west of Western Australia. [5]

Related Research Articles

<i>Thomasia</i>

Thomasia is a genus of thirty-one species of flowering plants in the family Malvaceae. Plants in this genus are small shrubs that are endemic to the south-west of Western Australia, apart from P. petalocalyx that is native to Victoria and South Australia. The leaves are simple with leaf-like stipules at the base of the petiole, the flowers bisexual with five papery, petal-like sepals, usually five petals and five stamens opposite the petals. The fruit is a capsule covered with star-like hairs.

<i>Diuris corymbosa</i> Species of orchid

Diuris corymbosa, commonly called the common donkey orchid or wallflower orchid, is a species of orchid which is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is similar to the purple pansy orchid but its flowers are yellow rather than purple or mauve and it flowers earlier in the year. It also resembles the winter donkey orchid but flowers later than that species. It is one of the most common orchid species in the Perth area, often forms extensive colonies and usually has numerous flowers on the one spike.

<i>Diuris porrifolia</i> Species of orchid

Diuris porrifolia, commonly called the small-flowered donkey orchid is a species of orchid which is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It has two or three leaves and up to seven yellow flowers with brown or reddish markings. It is similar to the common donkey orchid but its flowers are smaller and it has a more easterly distribution.

<i>Thelymitra macrophylla</i>

Thelymitra macrophylla, commonly called the large-leafed sun orchid or scented sun orchid, is a species of flowering plant in the orchid family Orchidaceae, and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It has a single thick, broad, leathery leaf and up to twenty five relatively large dark blue to purplish flowers with white, toothbrush-like tufts.

<i>Thomasia macrocarpa</i>

Thomasia macrocarpa, commonly known as large-fruited thomasia, is a shrub that is endemic to the southwest of Western Australia.

<i>Conothamnus</i> Genus of flowering plants

Conothamnus is a genus of flowering plants in the family Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. They are woody shrubs similar to melaleucas but differ in that their leaves are usually arranged in opposite pairs and the maximum number of seeds per fruit is three.

<i>Eremaea fimbriata</i> Species of flowering plant

Eremaea fimbriata is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a small shrub with small leaves and single purple flowers on the ends of the branches. The fruits are woody, urn-shaped with a small opening at the top. Unlike other eremaeas which remain dormant during winter, Eremaea fimbriata begins the new year's growth in July or August.

<i>Melaleuca parviceps</i> Species of shrub

Melaleuca parviceps, commonly known as rough honey-myrtle is a shrub in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae, and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a shrub with varying shades of pink or purple flowers, the stamens tipped with yellow anthers. In describing it, John Lindley noted: "every twig ... is terminated by hemispherical heads of brilliant pink". It is similar to Melaleuca manglesii and Melaleuca seriata.

Eremophila grandiflora is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to Western Australia. It is a large shrub with shiny leaves and the largest flowers in its genus and is only known from a restricted area near Paynes Find.

Eremophila perglandulosa is a flowering plant in the figwort family, Scrophulariaceae and is endemic to Western Australia. It is a low, spreading shrub which has small leaves with many glandular hairs and mauve or purple flowers.

<i>Verticordia densiflora</i> Species of flowering plant

Verticordia densiflora, commonly known as compacted featherflower, is a flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a shrub with small leaves, usually small pink and white flowers and which is widespread in the south-west of the state. It is a variable species and in his 1991 paper, Alex George formally described five varieties.

Verticordia densiflora var. rosteostella is a flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a shrub with small leaves and small groups of star-like, yellowish and pink flowers. It is one of 5 varieties of the species Verticordia densiflora.

Verticordia densiflora var. stelluligera is a flowering plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is an openly branched shrub with small leaves and small clusters of yellowish or pink and cream flowers. It is one of 5 varieties of the species Verticordia densiflora.

<i>Verticordia grandiflora</i> Species of flowering plant

Verticordia grandiflora, commonly known as claw featherflower, clawed featherflower or horned featherflower, is a flowering plant in the myrtle family Myrtaceae, and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a small, rigid shrub with many short side-branches, mostly linear leaves and heads of yellow flowers which soon age to reddish but which are among the largest in the genus. It is similar in appearance to several other species of verticordias with which it is often confused.

<i>Calytrix sapphirina</i> Species of flowering plant

Calytrix sapphirina is a species of plant in the myrtle family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

<i>Conothamnus trinervis</i> Species of flowering plant

Conothamnus trinervis is a plant species in the family Myrtaceae endemic to Western Australia. It is a shrub with thick, stiff stems, leaves with a sharp point on the tip and heads of usually cream-coloured flowers.

<i>Boronia scabra</i> Species of flowering plant

Boronia scabra, commonly known as rough boronia, is a plant in the citrus family, Rutaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is an open shrub with simple, often clustered, oblong to elliptic leaves, and pink, mostly four-petalled flowers.

<i>Thomasia angustifolia</i>

Thomasia angustifolia, commonly known as narrow-leaved thomasia, is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. The flowers are pinkish-purple, bell-shaped and hang in pendents from the leaf axils.

<i>Thomasia petalocalyx</i>

Thomasia petalocalyx, commonly known as paper flower, is endemic to southern and western parts of Australia. The flowers are bell-like, a delicate pink with 5 papery segments and hang low to the ground.

<i>Goodenia grandiflora</i> Species of plant

Goodenia grandiflora, commonly known as large-flowered goodenia, pinnate goodenia or mountain primrose, is a species of flowering plant in the family Goodeniaceae and is endemic to Australia. It is an erect under-shrub with toothed, egg-shaped to round leaves and racemes or thyrses of yellow, white or purplish flowers.

References

  1. "Thomasia grandiflora". Australian Plant Census. Retrieved 15 September 2019.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. Greig, Denise (1999). Field Guide to Australian Wildflowers. Avery Chase-New Holland. ISBN   1-86436-334-7.
  3. "Thomasia grandiflora". FloraBase . Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
  4. Shepherd, Kelly A. (2019). "Thomasia grandiflora". Nuytsia (30). Retrieved 15 September 2019.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. 1 2 3 Harris, Thistle Y. (1979). Gardening with Australian Plants. Melbourne, Victoria: Thomas Nelson Australia. ISBN   0-17-005120-X.
  6. "Thomasia grandifolia". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 27 February 2009.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. Lyndley, John. "A Sketch of the Vegetation of the Swan River Colony" . Retrieved 15 September 2019.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. 1 2 Brown, Roland W. (1956). The Composition of Scientific Words. Washington D.C: Smithsonian Institution Press.