Thomasia grandiflora

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Thomasia grandiflora
Thomasia grandiflora 1187.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae
Genus: Thomasia
Species:
T. grandiflora
Binomial name
Thomasia grandiflora

Thomasia grandiflora, commonly known as large-flowered thomasia, [2] is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. The flowers are pinkish-purple with a papery appearance hanging in pendents from the leaf axils. The calyx lobes are prominent and larger than the petals.

Botanical name scientific name for a plant (or alga or fungus) (ICNafp)

A botanical name is a formal scientific name conforming to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN) and, if it concerns a plant cultigen, the additional cultivar or Group epithets must conform to the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP). The code of nomenclature covers "all organisms traditionally treated as algae, fungi, or plants, whether fossil or non-fossil, including blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria), chytrids, oomycetes, slime moulds and photosynthetic protists with their taxonomically related non-photosynthetic groups ."

Contents

Description

Thomasia grandiflora is a small shrub that grows to about 1 m (3 ft 3 in) high and wide. The dark, bright green leaves vary in shape, usually heart-shaped or occasionally narrowly elliptic, slightly flexible, leathery and 15–25 mm (0.59–0.98 in) long. The flowers have wide, conspicuous, pinkish-purple calyx lobes that are more prominent than the petals. The calyx is thicker near the mid-vein. The small petals are densely covered with star-shaped hairs, occasionally with only a few scattered hairs. The flowers have a papery texture and about 2 cm (0.79 in) across on short pendant stalks. The flowers are followed by capsules containing black seeds that are shed from the plant when ripe. Flowering occurs from winter to spring. [3] [4] [5]

Taxonomy and naming

Thomasia grandiflora was first formally described by botanist John Lindley in 1839 who published the description in A sketch of the vegetation of the Swan River Colony in 1839. [6] [7] The specific epithet (grandiflora) is from the Latin grandis meaning "large" or "great" [8] :378 and flos meaning "flower" [8] :338 referring to the large flowers of the species. [5]

Latin Indo-European language of the Italic family

Latin is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet.

Distribution and habitat

Large-flowered tomasia is a widespread species, mostly near coastal locations growing in open forest in the south-west of Western Australia. [5]

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References

  1. "Thomasia grandiflora". Australian Plant Census. Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  2. Greig, Denise (1999). Field Guide to Australian Wildflowers. Avery Chase-New Holland. ISBN   1-86436-334-7.
  3. "Thomasia grandiflora". FloraBase . Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
  4. Shepherd, Kelly A. (2019). "Thomasia grandiflora". Nuytsia (30). Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  5. 1 2 3 Harris, Thistle Y. (1979). Gardening with Australian Plants. Melbourne, Victoria: Thomas Nelson Australia. ISBN   0-17-005120-X.
  6. "Thomasia grandifolia". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 27 February 2009.
  7. Lyndley, John. "A Sketch of the Vegetation of the Swan River Colony" . Retrieved 15 September 2019.
  8. 1 2 Brown, Roland W. (1956). The Composition of Scientific Words. Washington D.C: Smithsonian Institution Press.