Thomasia purpurea

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Thomasia purpurea
Thomasia purpureamine3.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae
Genus: Thomasia
Species:
T. purpurea
Binomial name
Thomasia purpurea
Synonyms

Lasiopetalum purpureum Dryand.

Thomasia purpurea is a small shrub that is endemic to the southwest of Western Australia. [2] It usually grows to between 0.3 and 1.2 metres in height. [2] Pink to purple flowers are produced between April and December in the species' native range. [2]

Western Australia State in Australia

Western Australia is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, and the Southern Ocean to the south, the Northern Territory to the north-east, and South Australia to the south-east. Western Australia is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,529,875 square kilometres, and the second-largest country subdivision in the world, surpassed only by Russia's Sakha Republic. The state has about 2.6 million inhabitants – around 11 percent of the national total – of whom the vast majority live in the south-west corner, 79 per cent of the population living in the Perth area, leaving the remainder of the state sparsely populated.

The species was first formally described by Swedish botanist Jonas Carlsson Dryander, his description published in William Aiton's Hortus Kewensis in 1811 as Lasiopetalum purpureum. [3] The type specimen was collected by botanist Robert Brown from King George Sound in 1801. In 1821 French botanist Jacques Etienne Gay placed the species in the genus Thomasia . [1]

Jonas Carlsson Dryander Swedish botanist

Jonas Carlsson Dryander was a Swedish botanist.

William Aiton Scottish botanist

William Aiton was a Scottish botanist.

Hortus Kewensis, or a Catalogue of the Plants Cultivated in the Royal Botanic Garden at Kew by William Aiton was a 1789 catalogue of all the plant species then in cultivation at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, which constituted the vast majority of plant species in cultivation in all of England. It included information on the country of origin, who introduced the plant into English cultivation, and when. It is therefore now one of the most important sources of information on history of horticulture in England.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Thomasia purpurea". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 12 December 2011.
  2. 1 2 3 "Thomasia purpurea". FloraBase . Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
  3. "Lasiopetalum purpureum". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 12 December 2011.