Thomasia sarotes

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Thomasia sarotes
Thomasia sarotes.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae
Genus: Thomasia
Species:
T. sarotes
Binomial name
Thomasia sarotes

Thomasia sarotes is a shrub which is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia.

Western Australia State in Australia

Western Australia is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, and the Southern Ocean to the south, the Northern Territory to the north-east, and South Australia to the south-east. Western Australia is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,529,875 square kilometres, and the second-largest country subdivision in the world, surpassed only by Russia's Sakha Republic. The state has about 2.6 million inhabitants – around 11 percent of the national total – of whom the vast majority live in the south-west corner, 79 per cent of the population living in the Perth area, leaving the remainder of the state sparsely populated.

It grows to between 0.25 metres and 1.1 metres in height and 1.2 metres in width. Purple, pink or white flowers appear from August to December in its native range. [1]

The species was first formally described by botanist Nicolai Stepanovitch Turczaninow in Bulletin de la Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou in 1852. [2]

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References

  1. "Thomasia sarotes". FloraBase . Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
  2. "Thomasia sarotes". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government.