Thompson (surname)

Last updated
Thompson
Pronunciation /ˈtɒmpsən/ TOMP-sən
Origin
MeaningSon of Thom, Son of Thomas, Son of Tom
Region of origin Scotland and England
Other names
Variant form(s)Di Tommaso, Thom, Thomas, Thomason, Thomassen, Thomasson, Thomson, Tom, Tomadze, Tomašević, Tomashov, Tomashvili, Tomaszewicz, Tomescu, Tommasi, Tumasian, Tumasyan
[1]

Thompson is a surname of English origin, with Thomson, originally meaning 'son of Thomas (twin)' being the more common spelling in Scotland. [2] An alternative origin may be geographical, arising from the parish of Thompson in Norfolk. [3] During the Plantation period, settlers carried the name to Ireland. Thom(p)son is also the English translation of MacTavish, which is the Anglicised version of the Gaelic name MacTamhais. [4]

Contents

According to the 2010 United States Census, Thompson was the 23rd most frequently reported surname, accounting for 0.23% of the population. [5]

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Fictional characters

Further reading

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References

  1. 1990 Census Name Files Archived 2010-10-07 at the Library of Congress Web Archives
  2. Quinn, Seán E. (2000), Surnames in Ireland (Google Snippet), Bray, Ireland: Irish Genealogy Press, p. 173, ISBN   978-1-871509-39-7, OCLC   48632352 , retrieved 1 January 2012
  3. Redmonds, George; King, Turi; Hey, David (2011), "Hereditary Surnames", Surnames, DNA, and Family History, New York: Oxford University Press, Classifying Surnames, ISBN   978-0-19-162036-2 , retrieved 1 Jan 2012
  4. "Scottish Thompson Name is MacTavish". Clan MacTavish. Archived from the original on 29 January 2014. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  5. Bureau, US Census. "Frequently Occurring Surnames from the 2010 Census". www.census.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-07.

See also