Thompson (surname)

Last updated
Thompson
Pronunciation /ˈtɒmpsən/ TOMP-sən
Origin
MeaningSon of Thom, Son of Thomas, Son of Tom
Other names
Variant form(s)Di Tommaso, Thom, Thomas, Thomason, Thomassen, Thomasson, Thomson, Tom, Tomadze, Tomašević, Tomashov, Tomashvili, Tomaszewicz, Tomescu, Tommasi, Tumasian, Tumasyan
[1]

Thompson is a surname of Scottish origin, with a variety of spellings, meaning "son of roman". [2] An alternative origin may be geographical, arising from the placename Thompson. [3] During the Plantation period, settlers carried the name to Ireland. There has been a third alternative claim made that Thom(p)son originated as the English translation of MacTavish, which is the Anglicised version of the Gaelic name of MacTamhais. [4]

Contents

Thompson is the 14th most common surname in the United Kingdom. According to the 2010 United States Census, Thompson was the 23rd most frequently reported surname, accounting for 0.23% of the population. [5]

Notable people with the surname

A–D

E–H

I–K

L–P

R–S

T–Z

Fictional characters

Further reading

Related Research Articles

Blake is a surname or a given name which originated from Old English. Its derivation is uncertain; it could come from "blac", a nickname for someone who had dark hair or skin, or from "blaac", a nickname for someone with pale hair or skin. Another theory, presumably in the belief it is a Welsh patronymic in origin, for which there is no evidence whatsoever, was that it is a corruption of "Ap Lake", meaning "Son of Lake".

Wright is an occupational surname originating in England. The term 'Wright' comes from the circa 700 AD Old English word 'wryhta' or 'wyrhta', meaning worker or shaper of wood. Later it became any occupational worker, and is used as a British family name.

MacLeod and McLeod are surnames in the English language.

Davies is a patronymic Welsh surname. It may be a corruption of Dyfed, itself a corruption of Dési, colonists from south-east Ireland who occupied the old tribal area of the Demetae in south-west Wales in the late third century AD, establishing a dynasty which lasted five centuries. Dyfed is recorded as a surname as late as the 12th century for e.g. Gwynfard Dyfed, born in 1175. 'Dafydd' appears as a given name in the 13th Century, e.g. Dafydd ap Gruffydd (1238–1283), Prince of Wales, and Dafydd ab Edmwnd, Welsh poet. The given name 'Dafydd' is generally translated into English as 'David'. Alternatively it may derive from David, the name of Wales's patron saint. In Wales Davies is standardly pronounced DAY-vis, that is, identically to Davis. This pronunciation is also used by many outside the United Kingdom, where it competes with the spelling pronunciation DAY-veez, which is particularly common in the US.

Nick is a masculine given name. It is also often encountered as a short form (hypocorism) of the given names Nicholas, Nicola, Nicolas or Nikola. It may refer to:

Anderson is a surname deriving from a patronymic meaning "son of Anders/Andrew". It originated in parallel in the British Isles and the Nordic countries.

Cooper is an English surname originating in England; see Cooper (profession). Cooper is the 4th most common surname in Liberia and 35th most common in England.

Fisher is an English occupational name for one who obtained a living by fishing. The surname was also given to someone who lived close to a fish weir on a river. It is therefore a topographical type surname as well as an occupational type surname. In Ireland it is the anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Bradáin 'descendant of Bradán', a personal name meaning ‘salmon’. This name was sometimes translated into English as Salmon or Fisher. The Celtic name Mac an Iascair in Ireland or MacInesker in Scotland also translates to Fisher. The German version of the surname is Fischer, the Dutch version is Visser and the Italian version is Pescatore - which is derived from the Latin surname Piscator. The Fisher motto is "Respice finem" which means "Regard the End".

Henderson is a common Scottish surname. The name is derived from patronymic form of the name Hendry, which is a Scottish form of Henry. Some Hendersons also derive their name from Henryson.

The surname Collins has a variety of likely origins in Britain and Ireland:

  1. Anglo-Saxon: A patronymic surname based on the name Colin, an English diminutive form of Nicholas.
  2. Norse: From the Old Norse personal name "Kollungr" a form of "koli" which in Old English became 'Cola', meaning swarthy or dark.
  3. Irish: The medieval surname was Ua Cuiléin, which has usually become Ó Coileáin today.
  4. Welsh: Collen; hazel, hazel grove.

Gavin is a male given name. It is a variation on the medieval name Gawain, meaning "God send" or "white hawk". Sir Gawain was a knight of King Arthur's Round Table. Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is an epic poem connected with King Arthur's Round Table. Gawain beheads the Green Knight who promptly replaces his head and threatens Gawain an identical fate the same time next year. Decapitation figures elsewhere: the Italian name Gavino (considered equivalent to Gavin) is the name of an early Christian martyr who was beheaded in 300 AD, his head being thrown in the Mediterranean Sea only later reunited and interred with his body.

James is a common surname with many origins. Notable people with the surname include:

Thomas is a common surname of English, Welsh, Irish, Scottish, French, German, Dutch, and Danish origin.

Barnes is an English surname and rare given name. At the time of the British Census of 1881, the relative frequency of the surname Barnes was highest in Dorset, followed by Wiltshire, Cumberland, Hampshire, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Buckinghamshire, Huntingdonshire, Lancashire and Sussex.

Cameron is a given name in the English language. It is a popular unisex name in North America, Australia and the UK. Cameron is ranked as a top 50 name for boys in Scotland.

Robinson is an English language patronymic surname, originating in England. It means "son of Robin ". There are similar surname spellings such as Robison and Robeson. Robinson is the 15th-most common surname in the United Kingdom. According to the 1990 United States Census, Robinson was the twentieth most frequently encountered surname among those reported, accounting for 0.23% of the population.

Sheridan is an Anglicized version of the Irish surname O'Sirideáin, originating in Co Longford, Ireland. In Irish, it means grandson or descendant of Sheridan.

Oliver is a surname derived from the Old French personal name Olivier. The Oliver surname seems to be French Norman in origin. The Scottish Oliver family was a sept of the Scotland Highlands' powerful Clan Fraser of Lovat.

References

  1. 1990 Census Name Files Archived 2010-10-07 at the Library of Congress Web Archives
  2. Quinn, Seán E. (2000), Surnames in Ireland (Google Snippet), Bray, Ireland: Irish Genealogy Press, p. 173, ISBN   978-1-871509-39-7, OCLC   48632352 , retrieved 1 January 2012
  3. Redmonds, George; King, Turi; Hey, David (2011), "Hereditary Surnames", Surnames, DNA, and Family History, New York: Oxford University Press, Classifying Surnames, ISBN   978-0-19-162036-2 , retrieved 1 Jan 2012
  4. "Scottish Thompson Name is MacTavish". Clan MacTavish. Retrieved 24 August 2019.
  5. Bureau, US Census. "Frequently Occurring Surnames from the 2010 Census". www.census.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-07.

See also