Thomson TO7

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Thomson TO7
Thomson TO-07-IMG 0414.jpg
Thomson TO7 computer on display at the Musée Bolo, EPFL, Lausanne
Developer Thomson SA
Type Home computer
Generation 8-bit
Release dateFrance: 1 December 1982;37 years ago (1982-12-01)
Lifespan1982-1984
DiscontinuedMay 1984
Media Cassette tape, MEMO7 cartridges
Operating system none
CPU Motorola 6809 @ 1 MHz
Memory8  KB RAM, 4KB ROM
Successor Thomson TO7/70

The Thomson TO7, also called Thomson 9000 [1] is a home computer introduced by Thomson SA in November 1982, with an original retail price of 3750 Franc. By 1983 over 40000 units were produced. [2]

The TO7 is built around a 1 MHz Motorola 6809 processor. ROM cartridges, designed as MEMO7, can be introduced through a memory bay. The user interface uses Microsoft BASIC, included in the kit cartridge. The keyboard features a plastic membrane, and further user input is obtained through a lightpen. Cooling is provided by a rear radiator. Standard TV screens can be used as output through a SCART (Peritel) connector, with a resolution of 320x200 (with 2 colors for each 8x1 pixels).

An upgraded version, the Thomson TO7/70, was released in 1984. [1] Among improvements was an increased RAM of 48KB (64 KB including Video RAM) instead of 8KB (22 KB including video RAM). 70 stands for 64+6 (64KB RAM + 6KB ROM). The 6809 processor was replaced by a 6809E and the color palette was extended from 8 to 16 colors.

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References

  1. 1 2 "OLD-COMPUTERS.COM : The Museum". www.old-computers.com.
  2. "Thomson TO7". www.obsolete-tears.com.