Thomson computers

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In the 1980s the French Thomson company produced a range of 8-bit computers based on the 6809E CPU. [1] They were released in a lot[ vague ] of models variations (mostly concerning the keyboard or color of the casing) from late 1982 to 1989.

In computer architecture, 8-bit integers, memory addresses, or other data units are those that are 8 bits wide. Also, 8-bit CPU and ALU architectures are those that are based on registers, address buses, or data buses of that size. 8-bit is also a generation of microcomputers in which 8-bit microprocessors were the norm.

Contents

While MO and TO models are incompatible in software, most of the peripherals and hardware were compatible.

First generation

Thomson MO5

The ThomsonMO5 is a home computer introduced in France in 1984 to compete against systems such as the ZX Spectrum and Commodore 64. At the same time, Thomson also released the up-market Thomson TO7/70 machine. The MO5 was not sold in vast quantities outside France and was largely discontinued in favour of the improved Thomson MO6 in 1986. MO5s were also used as educational tools in French schools for a period.

Michel Platini French association football player, manager and executive

Michel François Platini is a French former football player, manager and administrator. Regarded as one of the greatest footballers of all time, Platini won the Ballon d'Or three times, in 1983, 1984 and 1985, and came sixth in the FIFA Player of the Century vote. In recognition of his achievements, he was named a Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur in 1985 and became an Officier in 1998. As the president of UEFA in 2015 he was banned from football, over ethics violations.

Parallel port an interface for connecting peripherals to computers

A parallel port is a type of interface found on computers for connecting peripherals. The name refers to the way the data is sent; parallel ports send multiple bits of data at once, in parallel communication, as opposed to serial interfaces that send bits one at a time. To do this, parallel ports require multiple data lines in their cables and port connectors, and tend to be larger than contemporary serial ports which only require one data line.

Second generation

Thomson MO6 Thomson familial micro-computer

The ThomsonMO6 was an 6809E-based computer introduced in France in 1986. It featured 128 KB of RAM, a 40×25 text display, and built-in Microsoft BASIC. The MO6 was available until January 1989.

Thomson TO8

The Thomson TO8 is a home computer introduced by French company Thomson SA in 1986. It replaces its predecessor, the Thomson TO7/70 while remaining essentially compatible.

Modem Device that modulates an analog carrier signal to encode digital information

A modem is a hardware device that converts data into a format suitable for a transmission medium so that it can be transmitted from computer to computer. A modem modulates one or more carrier wave signals to encode digital information for transmission and demodulates signals to decode the transmitted information. The goal is to produce a signal that can be transmitted easily and decoded to reproduce the original digital data. Modems can be used with almost any means of transmitting analog signals from light-emitting diodes to radio. A common type of modem is one that turns the digital data of a computer into modulated electrical signal for transmission over telephone lines and demodulated by another modem at the receiver side to recover the digital data.

PC compatible

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Macintosh 512K

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