Thornburg House

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Thornburg House
THORNBURG HOUSE, BARBOURSVILLE, CABELL COUNTY, WV.jpg
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Location 700 Main St., Barboursville, West Virginia
Coordinates 38°24′35″N82°17′40″W / 38.40972°N 82.29444°W / 38.40972; -82.29444 Coordinates: 38°24′35″N82°17′40″W / 38.40972°N 82.29444°W / 38.40972; -82.29444
Area 0.5 acres (0.20 ha)
Built 1901
Architectural style Colonial Revival, Queen Anne
NRHP reference #

91000451

[1]
Added to NRHP April 25, 1991

Thornburg House is a historic home located at Barboursville, Cabell County, West Virginia. It was built in 1901, and is a two-story brick and frame dwelling with irregular massing, varied roof shapes, and large porches in the Queen Anne style. It features a corner turret with a pointed roof and a wraparound porch. Also on the property is a contributing privy. [2]

Barboursville, West Virginia Village in West Virginia, United States

Barboursville is a village in Cabell County, West Virginia, United States. It is located near the second largest city in the state, Huntington. The population was 3,964 at the 2010 census.

Cabell County, West Virginia County in the United States

Cabell County is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 96,319, making it West Virginia's fourth-most populous county. Its county seat is Huntington. The county was organized in 1809 and named for William H. Cabell, the Governor of Virginia from 1805 to 1808.

Queen Anne style architecture in the United States architectural style during Victorian Era

In the United States, Queen Anne-style architecture was popular from roughly 1880 to 1910. "Queen Anne" was one of a number of popular architectural styles to emerge during the Victorian era. Within the Victorian era timeline, Queen Anne style followed the Stick style and preceded the Richardsonian Romanesque and Shingle styles.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1991. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Michael Gioulis (January 1991). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thornburg House" (PDF). State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-07-23.