Three Groves Wood

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Three Groves Wood
Nuthatch (Sitta europaea) (13).JPG
Example - nuthatch (Sitta europaea)
Gloucestershire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Three Groves Wood shown within Gloucestershire
Type Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust nature reserve
Location Frome Valley, near Chalford
Coordinates 51°43′30.72″N2°7′41.08″W / 51.7252000°N 2.1280778°W / 51.7252000; -2.1280778 Coordinates: 51°43′30.72″N2°7′41.08″W / 51.7252000°N 2.1280778°W / 51.7252000; -2.1280778
Area 8 acres (3.2 ha)
Created 1986
Operated by Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust
Status Open all year

Three Groves Wood (grid reference SO912029 ) is a 3.3-hectare (8.2-acre) nature reserve in Gloucestershire. [1] The site is listed in the ‘Stroud District’ Local Plan, adopted November 2005, Appendix 6 (online for download) as a Key Wildlife Site (KWS). [2] [3]

Ordnance Survey National Grid System of geographic grid references used in Great Britain

The Ordnance Survey National Grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).

Gloucestershire County of England

Gloucestershire is a county in South West England. The county comprises part of the Cotswold Hills, part of the flat fertile valley of the River Severn, and the entire Forest of Dean.

Contents

The site is owned and managed by the Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust. It was given to the trust in 1986 (anonymous donor). [1]

Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust organization

The Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust is the Gloucestershire local partner in a conservation network of 47 Wildlife Trusts. The Wildlife Trusts are local charities with the specific aim of protecting the United Kingdom's natural heritage. The Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust is managed by a Board of Trustees elected from its membership who provide overall direction for the development of the Trust and there are Advisory Committees. The work of the trust is carried out through staff and volunteers.

Location and habitat

The wood forms part of a much larger area of ancient woodland which is sited on the north side of the Frome Valley. Chalford is about one mile to the west. It is possible that the wood was once part of Oakridge Common and was once subject to commoners' rights, but little history information has been located. It is on Oolitic limestone and there is evidence of small quarries within the wood. There is a public footpath through the wood. There is a stream at the bottom of the slope. [1]

River Frome, Stroud river that flows through Stroud in Gloucestershire, United Kingdom

The River Frome, once also known as the Stroudwater, is a small river in Gloucestershire, England. It is to be distinguished from another River Frome in Gloucestershire, the Bristol Frome, and the nearby River Frome, Herefordshire. The river is approximately 25 miles (40 km) long.

Chalford a village located in Stroud District, United Kingdom

Chalford is a large village in the Frome Valley of the Cotswolds in Gloucestershire, England. It is to the southeast of Stroud about 4 miles (6.4 km) upstream. It gives its name to Chalford parish, which covers the villages of Chalford, Chalford Hill, France Lynch, Bussage and Brownshill, spread over 2 square miles (5.2 km2) of the Cotswold countryside. At this point the valley is also called the Golden Valley.

Oakridge, Gloucestershire village in Gloucestershire, England

Oakridge is a village in Gloucestershire, England. The parish church is St. Bartholomew's Church. It is just on the outskirts of Stroud, Gloucestershire.

The three separate groves which make up the wood were known as Pearce Grove, Gassons Grove and Teals Grove. The reserve is shady with a diverse ground flora. [4]

Trees

The woodland is dominated by beech, which is typical of the area. Such woodlands were managed for timber production. There is some ash and pedunculate oak amongst the beech. There is old coppice of beech and whitebeam. The shrub layer includes hazel, spindle, yew, crab apple, field maple, holly, guelder-rose and the wayfaring-tree. [1]

Beech genus of plants

Beech (Fagus) is a genus of deciduous trees in the family Fagaceae, native to temperate Europe, Asia, and North America.

<i>Fraxinus</i> genus of plants

Fraxinus, English name ash, is a genus of flowering plants in the olive and lilac family, Oleaceae. It contains 45–65 species of usually medium to large trees, mostly deciduous, though a few subtropical species are evergreen. The genus is widespread across much of Europe, Asia, and North America.

Whitebeam subgenus of plants, the whitebeams

The whitebeams are members of the family Rosaceae, comprising subgenus Aria of genus Sorbus, and hybrids involving species of this subgenus and members of subgenera Sorbus, Torminaria and Chamaemespilus. They are deciduous trees with simple or lobed leaves, arranged alternately. They are related to the rowans, and many of the endemic restricted-range apomictic microspecies of whitebeam in Europe are thought to derive from hybrids between S. aria and the European rowan S. aucuparia; some are also thought to be hybrids with the wild service tree S. torminalis, notably the service tree of Fontainebleau Sorbus latifolia in French woodlands.

Ground flora

Spring flowers include woodruff, primrose, bluebell, wood anemone, yellow archangel and the common dog-violet. Summer flowers include broad-leaved helleborine, stinking hellebore, nettle-leaved bellflower. Grasses include wood barley (Hordelymus europaeus) and wood millet. Ferns are recorded in the quarry areas, such as hart's-tongue and soft shield-fern. Quaking-grass and glaucous sedge grow at the north edge of the wood, encroaching from the adjacent pasture. The stream area supports blue water-speedwell, brooklime and alternate-leaved golden-saxifrage. [1]

<i>Galium odoratum</i> species of plant

Galium odoratum, the sweetscented bedstraw, is a flowering perennial plant in the family Rubiaceae, native to much of Europe from Spain and Ireland to Russia, as well as Western Siberia, Turkey, Iran, the Caucasus, China and Japan. It is also sparingly naturalized in scattered locations in the United States and Canada. It is widely cultivated for its flowers and its sweet-smelling foliage.

<i>Primula vulgaris</i> species of plant

Primula vulgaris, the common primrose, is a species of flowering plant in the family Primulaceae, native to western and southern Europe, northwest Africa, and parts of southwest Asia. The common name is primrose, or occasionally common primrose or English primrose to distinguish it from other Primula species also called primroses.

<i>Hyacinthoides non-scripta</i> species of plant

Hyacinthoides non-scripta is a bulbous perennial plant, found in Atlantic areas from north-western Spain to the British Isles, and also frequently used as a garden plant. It is known in English as the common bluebell or simply bluebell, a name which is used in Scotland to refer to the harebell, Campanula rotundifolia. In spring, H. non-scripta produces a nodding, one-sided inflorescence of 5–12 tubular, sweet-scented violet–blue flowers, with strongly recurved tepals, and 3–6 long, linear, basal leaves.

Invertebrates

Butterflies recorded include gatekeeper and silver-washed fritillary. Molluscs found in this ancient woodland include Ena montana and Zenobiella subrufescens . [1]

Bird life

Birds on the reserve include nuthatch, green woodpecker and spotted flycatcher. [1]

Conservation

Woodland management is important to maintain sufficient light to support the ground flora. This includes thinning the beech trees, coppicing hazel and opening up glades [1]

Walks

There is a publication which details walks for recreation and observing wildlife in the Golden Valley. This includes information on Three Groves Wood and four other nearby nature reserves being Strawberry Banks SSSI, Siccaridge Wood, Daneway Banks SSSI and Sapperton Valley. The walk also includes other ancient woodland at Peyton's Grove, Oakridge village, Bakers Mill and Reservoir, Ashmeads Spring, and part of the route of the old Thames and Severn Canal. [4]

Publications

Related Research Articles

Lower Woods

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Midger

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Strawberry Banks

Strawberry Banks is a 5.06-hectare (12.5-acre) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Gloucestershire, notified in 1993.

Daneway Banks SSSI

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Wotton Hill

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Lower Wye Gorge SSSI

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Dymock Woods SSSI

Dymock Woods is a 53-hectare (130-acre) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Gloucestershire, notified in 1990. The site is listed in the 'Forest of Dean Local Plan Review' as a Key Wildlife Site (KWS).

Hobbs Quarry SSSI, Longhope

Hobbs Quarry, Longhope is a 1-hectare (2.5-acre) geological and biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Gloucestershire, notified in 1966. It is situated midway between Longhope and Dursley Cross in the Forest of Dean. Adjacent woods are Kiln Wood and Coleman's Wood. The site is managed by the Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust.

Collinpark Wood SSSI

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Bull Cross, The Frith and Juniper Hill

Bull Cross, The Frith and Juniper Hill is a 42.33-hectare (104.6-acre) biological and geological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Gloucestershire, notified in 1954. The site is listed in the ‘Stroud District’ Local Plan, adopted November 2005, Appendix 6 as an SSSI and Regionally Important Geological Site (RIGS).

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Siccaridge Wood nature reserve in England

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Sapperton Valley

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Kelham, A, Sanderson, J, Doe, J, Edgeley-Smith, M, et al., 1979, 1990, 2002 editions, 'Nature Reserves of the Gloucestershire Trust for Nature Conservation/Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust'
  2. Stroud District Local Plan, adopted November 2005, Appendix 6 ‘Sites of Nature Conservation Interest’ Archived 6 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine .
  3. "Nature reserve in Stroud's Golden Valley officially secured by Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust".
  4. 1 2 'The Golden Valley Walk', (undated), Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust