Three of Cups

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Three of Cups from a deck of Italian cards Piacentine-C3.svg
Three of Cups from a deck of Italian cards

Three of Cups is the third card on the suit of Cups. In Tarot, it is part of the Minor Arcana. In some decks the suit is named Chalices instead. This card is used in game playing as well as in divination.

Contents

Divination usage

This card often carries the meaning of joyful social contact, [1] although it may be considered to be rather superficial, unlike the two of the same suit which is considered more personal. There's agreement, general harmony, frivolity, and sometimes it is associated with birth, [2] [3] especially if it comes up with other birth-related cards such as The Empress.

Rider–Waite symbolism [ original research? ]

Three of Cups from the Rider-Waite tarot deck Cups03.jpg
Three of Cups from the Rider–Waite tarot deck

In other decks

In the Thoth Tarot deck this card is labeled Abundance, and is associated with the second decan of Cancer, said to be ruled by Mercury.

In fiction

In the first Circle of Three novel, the Three of Cups comes up in a Tarot reading and convinces the main character to pursue her Wiccan studies and befriend the two girls whom she met through her original encounter with witchcraft.

Related Research Articles

Card game Game using playing cards as the primary device

A card game is any game using playing cards as the primary device with which the game is played, be they traditional or game-specific.

Trick-taking game Type of card game

A trick-taking game is a card or tile-based game in which play of a hand centers on a series of finite rounds or units of play, called tricks, which are each evaluated to determine a winner or taker of that trick. The object of such games then may be closely tied to the number of tricks taken, as in plain-trick games such as Whist, contract bridge and Spades, or to the value of the cards contained in taken tricks, as in point-trick games such as Pinochle, the Tarot family, Briscola, and most evasion games like Hearts. Trick-and-draw games are trick-taking games in which the players can fill up their hands after each trick. In most variants, players are free to play any card into a trick in the first phase of the game, but must follow suit as soon as the stock is depleted. Trick-avoidance games like Reversis or Polignac are those in which the aim is to avoid taking some or all tricks.

Tarot Cards used for games or divination

The tarot is a pack of playing cards, used from at least the mid-15th century in various parts of Europe to play games such as Italian tarocchini, French tarot and Austrian Königrufen, many of which are still played today. In the late 18th century, some tarot decks began to be used for divination via tarot card reading and cartomancy leading to custom decks developed for such occult purposes.

Playing card suit Categories into which the cards of a deck are divided

In playing cards, a suit is one of the categories into which the cards of a deck are divided. Most often, each card bears one of several pips (symbols) showing to which suit it belongs; the suit may alternatively or additionally be indicated by the color printed on the card. The rank for each card is determined by the number of pips on it, except on face cards. Ranking indicates which cards within a suit are better, higher or more valuable than others, whereas there is no order between the suits unless defined in the rules of a specific card game. In a single deck, there is exactly one card of any given rank in any given suit. A deck may include special cards that belong to no suit, often called jokers.

French Tarot

The game of French Tarot, also jeu de tarot, is a trick-taking strategy tarot card game played by three to five players using a traditional 78-card tarot deck. The game is the second most popular card game in France and is also played in French-speaking Canada.

Italian playing cards Playing card deck used in Italy

Playing cards have been in Italy since the late 14th century. Until the mid 19th century, Italy was composed of many smaller independent states which led to the development of various regional patterns of playing cards; "Italian suited cards" normally only refer to cards originating from northeastern Italy around the former Republic of Venice, which are largely confined to northern Italy, parts of Switzerland, Dalmatia and southern Montenegro. Other parts of Italy traditionally use traditional local variants of Spanish suits, French suits or German suits.

Tarot of Marseilles

The Tarot of Marseilles or Tarot of Marseille, also widely known by the French designation Tarot de Marseille, is one of the standard patterns for the design of tarot cards. It is a pattern from which many subsequent tarot decks derive.

Minchiate is an early 16th-century card game, originating in Florence, Italy. It is no longer widely played. Minchiate can also refer to the special deck of 97 playing cards used in the game. The deck is closely related to the tarot cards, but contains an expanded suit of trumps. The game was similar to but more complex than tarocchi. The minchiate represents a Florentine variant on the original game.

Ace of Cups Playing card

Ace of Cups is a card used in Latin suited playing cards. It is the Ace from the suit of Cups. In Tarot, it is part of what card readers call the "Minor Arcana", and as the first in the suit of Cups, signifies beginnings in the area of the social and emotional in life. Connected with the number 4, 40, 400, 4000.

Nine of Cups

Nine of Cups is a card used in Latin suited playing cards which include tarot decks. It is part of what tarot card readers call the "Minor Arcana"

Suit of coins

The Suit of Coins is one of the four suits used in Latin suited playing cards, such as Spanish, Italian and tarot decks. It corresponds to the Suit of Diamonds in standard decks.

Ace of Wands (Tarot card)

The Ace of Wands is a tarot card of the Minor Arcana, arcana being Latin for mysteries. The cards of the minor arcana are considered to be lesser compared to the major arcana because they discuss the minor mysteries of life, less important archetypes. Modern tarot readers interpret the Ace of Wands as a symbol of optimism and invention.

The Suit of Wands is a suit in tarot decks and is part of what is called the "Minor Arcana". Like the other tarot suits, it contains fourteen cards: ace (one), two through ten, page and knight, queen and king.

Troccas

Troccas is a member of the Tarot family of card games. It is played in the Romansh speaking part of the canton Grisons of Switzerland. It is not known exactly how this game entered Switzerland but it is generally thought to have arrived from Italy during the 17th century.

Suit of goblets

The Suit of Goblets or Suit of Cups is a card suit used in tarot card divination. They are sometimes referred to as chalices. It is part of what is called the "Minor Arcana" and, like the other tarot suits, it contains fourteen cards: ace (one), two through ten, page, knight, queen and king. The suit represents the First Estate.

Tarot card reading Using tarot cards to perform divination

Tarot card reading is a form of cartomancy whereby practitioners use tarot cards purportedly to gain insight into the past, present or future. They formulate a question, then draw cards interpret them for this end. A regular tarot deck consists of 78 cards, which can be split into two groups, the major arcana and minor arcana.

Tarot card games

Tarot games are card games played with tarot decks, that is, decks with numbered permanent trumps parallel to the suit cards. The games and decks which English-speakers call by the French name Tarot are called Tarocchi in the original Italian, Tarock in German and various similar words in other languages. The basic rules first appeared in the manuscript of Martiano da Tortona, written before 1425. The games are known in many variations, mostly cultural and regional.

French-suited playing cards Card deck using suits of clubs, diamonds, hearts, and spades

French-suited playing cards or French-suited cards are cards that use the French suits of trèfles, carreaux, cœurs, and piques. Each suit contains three face cards: the valet, the dame, and the roi (king). Aside from these aspects, decks can include a wide variety of regional and national patterns, which often have different deck sizes. In comparison to Spanish, Italian, German, and Swiss playing cards, French cards are the most widespread due to the geopolitical, commercial, and cultural influence of France, the United Kingdom, and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries. Other reasons for their popularity were the simplicity of the suit insignia, which simplifies mass production, and the popularity of whist and contract bridge. The English pattern of French-suited cards is so widespread that it is often also known as the International or Anglo-American pattern.

Scarto

Scarto is a three player trick-taking tarot card game from Piedmont, Italy. It is a simple tarot game which can serve as an introduction to more complex tarot games. The name comes from the discarded cards that were exchanged with the stock, which is also the origin of the name for the Skat card game.

The Fool (Tarot card)

The Fool is one of the 78 cards in a tarot deck. In tarot card reading, it is one of the 22 Major Arcana, sometimes numbered as 0 or XXII. However, in decks designed for playing traditional tarot card games, it is typically unnumbered, as it is not one of the 21 trump cards and instead serves a unique purpose by itself.

References

  1. 3 of Cups Psychic Event Entertainment
  2. Sharman Burke, "Understanding The Tarot: A Personal Teaching Guide", page 66. St. Martin's Press, 1998. ISBN   0-312-17913-8
  3. Paranormality.com