Through the Dark (1924 film)

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Through the Dark
Through the Dark (SAYRE 14307).jpg
Still with Colleen Moore and Forrest Stanley
Directed by George W. Hill
Written by Frances Marion (scenario)
Based on"The Daughter of Mother McGinn"
by Jack Boyle
Starring Forrest Stanley
Colleen Moore
CinematographyL. William O'Connell
Allen Siegler
Production
company
Distributed by Goldwyn Pictures
Release date
  • January 6, 1924 (1924-01-06)
Running time
80 mins.
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent (English intertitles)

Through the Dark is a 1924 American silent mystery crime drama film directed by George W. Hill, and starring Colleen Moore and Forrest Stanley as the popular detective character Boston Blackie. The film's scenario, written by Frances Marion, is based on the short story "The Daughter of Mother McGinn" by Jack Boyle. [1] The film was produced by William Randolph Hearst's Cosmopolitan Productionss and distributed through Goldwyn Pictures. [1]

Contents

Cast

Censorship

The film was banned by the British Board of Film Censors upon its release for its depiction of unspecified "taboo" subject matter. [2]

Preservation

An incomplete print of Through the Dark is preserved at the Library of Congress. [3] [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 Beauchamp, Cari (1998). Without Lying Down: Frances Marion and the Powerful Women of Early Hollywood. University of California Press. p. 447. ISBN   0-520-92138-0.
  2. Green, Jonathon; Karolides, Nicholas J. (2009). Encyclopedia of Censorship. Infobase Publishing. pp. 76–77. ISBN   1-438-11001-4.
  3. Progressive Silent Film List: Through the Dark at silentera.com
  4. Library of Congress American Silent Feature Film Survival Database: Through the Dark