The Return of Boston Blackie

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The Return of Boston Blackie
Directed by Harry O. Hoyt
Written byJack Boyle (story)
Leah Baird (adaptation,screenplay)
Starring Bob Custer
Strongheart
Production
company
Distributed byFirst Division Pictures
Release date
  • August 1, 1927 (1927-08-01)
Running time
6 reels (1787.6 meters)
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent film (English intertitles)

The Return of Boston Blackie is a 1927 low-budget, silent, drama genre film starring Bob Custer. Based upon a character created by Jack Boyle for short stories appearing in The American, Cosmopolitan and Redbook magazines in the 1900s. It was directed by Harry O. Hoyt and written by Leah Baird. The character also appeared in another silent film in 1918, Boston Blackie's Little Pal, played by five different actors, including Lionel Barrymore.

Contents

The story

Just out of jail and vowing to go straight, former jewel thief Boston Blackie undertakes the reformation of a pretty blonde who has stolen a necklace from a cabaret dancer. He learns that the jewel belongs to the mother of the blonde girl, and the blonde's philandering father gave it as a gift to the cabaret girl. Blackie must find a way to return the necklace to the owner's safe without arousing the suspicions of the girl's family.

Cast


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