Trapped by Boston Blackie

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Trapped by Boston Blackie
Directed by Seymour Friedman
Screenplay byMaurice Tombragel
Story by Charles Marion
Edward Bock
Based onBased upon the character created by Jack Boyle
Produced by Rudolph C. Flothow
Starring Chester Morris
Cinematography Philip Tannura, A.S.C.
Edited by Dwight Caldwell
Music by Mischa Bakaleinikoff (musical director)
Production
company
Distributed by Columbia Pictures Corporation
Release date
  • May 13, 1948 (1948-05-13)
Running time
67 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Trapped by Boston Blackie is a 1948 American crime drama directed by Seymour Friedman. It is the thirteenth of fourteen Columbia Pictures films starring Chester Morris as reformed crook Boston Blackie, and the final film with George E. Stone as "The Runt".

Contents

Plot

While consoling Helen, the widow of Blackie's detective friend Joe Kenyon who died in a suspicious auto accident, Blackie and The Runt offer their services for a security job. They are tasked with securing an extremely expensive pearl necklace for a wealthy client named Mrs. Carter. When the pearls turn up missing Blackie and The Runt become the prime suspects and must clear their names and find the real culprit along with any connection to Joe Kenyon's suspicious death.

Cast

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