The Phantom Thief

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The Phantom Thief
Directed by D. Ross Lederman
Written byJack Boyle
G.A. Snow
Richard Wormser
Richard Weil
Malcolm Stuart Boylan
Produced by John Stone
Starring Chester Morris
Jeff Donnell
Richard Lane
CinematographyGeorge Meehan
Edited by Al Clark
Music by Mischa Bakaleinikoff
Distributed by Columbia Pictures Corporation
Release date
  • May 2, 1946 (1946-05-02)
Running time
65 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Phantom Thief is a 1946 American crime film directed by D. Ross Lederman. [1] The film follows detective Boston Blackie as he tries to track down a blackmailer-murderer. As the investigation goes on, a supernatural element becomes clear.

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References

  1. Sandra Brennan (2014). "The Phantom Thief". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times . Baseline & All Movie Guide. Archived from the original on December 10, 2014. Retrieved December 4, 2014.