The Million Dollar Collar

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The Million Dollar Collar
Directed by D. Ross Lederman
Written byJames A. Starr (titles)
Screenplay by Robert Lord
Story byRobert Lord
Starring Rin Tin Tin
Production
company
Distributed byWarner Bros.
Release date
  • February 9, 1929 (1929-02-09)(limited)
Running time
62 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent (English intertitles)
Budget$62,000 [1]
Box office$312,000 [1]

The Million Dollar Collar is a 1929 American part-talkie crime film directed by D. Ross Lederman. [2] It was a part-talkie released in Vitaphone with music and sound effects. The film is in unknown status which suggests that it may be lost. [3] [4] According to Warner Bros records the film earned $222,000 domestically and $90,000 foreign. [1]

Contents

Cast

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Warner Bros financial information in The William Shaefer Ledger. See Appendix 1, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, (1995) 15:sup1, 1-31 p 7 DOI: 10.1080/01439689508604551
  2. Sandra Brennan (2014). "The Million Dollar Collar". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times . Baseline & All Movie Guide. Archived from the original on December 7, 2014. Retrieved November 28, 2014.
  3. The Million Dollar Collar at silentera.com
  4. The Library of Congress/FIAF American Silent Feature Film Survival Catalog:The Million Dollar Collar