The Range Feud

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The Range Feud
Range Feud FilmPoster.jpeg
Film poster
Directed by D. Ross Lederman
Written by
  • Milton Krims
  • George H. Plympton
Produced byIrving Briskin
Starring
Cinematography Benjamin H. Kline
Edited byMaurice Wright
Production
company
Columbia Pictures
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date
  • December 2, 1931 (1931-12-02)
Running time
64 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Range Feud is a 1931 American Pre-Code Western film directed by D. Ross Lederman for Columbia Pictures, that stars Buck Jones and John Wayne. Wayne biographer Ronald L. Davis referred to the film as the first in a collection of "cheap, assembly-line pictures" Wayne would make in the 1930s. [1] It was remade in 1934 as a 15-chapter Buck Jones serial called The Red Rider (without Wayne). [2] [3]

Contents

Plot

Clint Turner is arrested for the murder of his girlfriend Judy Walton's father. Clint falls under suspicion because the dead man was a rival rancher who had been an enemy of Clint's father years before. It is Sheriff Gordon's job to sort the whole thing out.

Cast

See also

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References

  1. Davis, Ronald L. (September 6, 2012). Duke: The Life and Image of John Wayne. University of Oklahoma Press. p. 49. ISBN   978-0-8061-8646-7.
  2. "The Red Rider". September 16, 2013.
  3. Cline, William C. (1984). "2. In Search of Ammunition". In the Nick of Time. McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 10. ISBN   0-7864-0471-X.