Moonlight on the Prairie

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Moonlight on the Prairie
Moonlight on the Prairie.jpg
Film poster
Directed by D. Ross Lederman
Written by William Jacobs
Starring Dick Foran
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date
  • November 2, 1935 (1935-11-02)
Running time
63 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Moonlight on the Prairie is a 1935 American Western film directed by D. Ross Lederman. [1] It was the first of a Warner Bros. singing cowboy film series with Dick Foran and his Palomino Smoke. A print is preserved in the Library of Congress collection. [2]

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Related Research Articles

A singing cowboy was a subtype of the archetypal cowboy hero of early Western films. It references real-world campfire side ballads in the American frontier, the original cowboys sang of life on the trail with all the challenges, hardships, and dangers encountered while pushing cattle for miles up the trails and across the prairies. This continues with modern vaquero traditions and within the genre of Western music, and its related New Mexico, Red Dirt, Tejano, and Texas country music styles. A number of songs have been written and made famous by groups like the Sons of the Pioneers and Riders in the Sky and individual performers such as Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Tex Ritter, Bob Baker and other "singing cowboys". Singing in the wrangler style, these entertainers have served to preserve the cowboy as a unique American hero.

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References

  1. Hans J. Wollstein (2014). "Moonlight on the Prairie". Movies & TV Dept. The New York Times . Baseline & All Movie Guide. Archived from the original on December 7, 2014. Retrieved November 29, 2014.
  2. Catalog of Holdings The American Film Institute Collection and The United Artists Collection at The Library of Congress, (<-book title) p.120 c.1978 by The American Film Institute