Tieregghorn

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Tieregghorn
Switzerland relief location map.jpg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Tieregghorn
Location in Switzerland
Highest point
Elevation 3,075 m (10,089 ft)
Prominence 105 m (344 ft) [1]
Parent peak Finsteraarhorn
Coordinates 46°22′23.3″N7°51′33.9″E / 46.373139°N 7.859417°E / 46.373139; 7.859417 Coordinates: 46°22′23.3″N7°51′33.9″E / 46.373139°N 7.859417°E / 46.373139; 7.859417
Geography
Location Valais, Switzerland
Parent range Bernese Alps

The Tieregghorn is a mountain of the Bernese Alps, located north of Ausserberg in the canton of Valais. It lies south of the Bietschhorn, on the range separating the Bietschtal from the Baltschiedertal.

Mountain A large landform that rises fairly steeply above the surrounding land over a limited area

A mountain is a large landform that rises above the surrounding land in a limited area, usually in the form of a peak. A mountain is generally steeper than a hill. Mountains are formed through tectonic forces or volcanism. These forces can locally raise the surface of the earth. Mountains erode slowly through the action of rivers, weather conditions, and glaciers. A few mountains are isolated summits, but most occur in huge mountain ranges.

Bernese Alps part of the Alps mountain range in Switzerland

The Bernese Alps are a mountain range of the Alps, located in western Switzerland. Although the name suggests that they are located in the Berner Oberland region of the canton of Bern, portions of the Bernese Alps are in the adjacent cantons of Valais, Fribourg and Vaud, the latter being usually named Fribourg Alps and Vaud Alps respectively. The highest mountain in the range, the Finsteraarhorn, is also the highest point in the canton of Bern.

Ausserberg Place in Valais, Switzerland

Ausserberg is a municipality in the district of Raron in the canton of Valais in Switzerland.

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References

  1. Retrieved from the Swisstopo topographic maps and Google Earth. The key col is located north of the summit at 2,970 metres.