Tiger Shark (film)

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Tiger Shark
Tiger Shark 1932 poster.jpg
1932 Theatrical Poster
Directed by Howard Hawks
Produced by Bryan Foy
Written by
Screenplay by Wells Root
Story by Houston Branch
Starring
Music by Bernhard Kaun
Cinematography Tony Gaudio
Edited by Thomas Pratt
Distributed by First National Pictures
Release date
  • September 22, 1932 (1932-09-22)(U.S.)
Running time
77 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$375,000 [1] gross=$879,000 [1]

Tiger Shark is a 1932 American pre-Code melodrama romantic film directed by Howard Hawks and starring Edward G. Robinson, Richard Arlen and Zita Johann. [2] The film was made the same year as Scarface , which is widely acknowledged to be the director's best film of the early sound era. The general storyline was repeated several times in subsequent films, most notably Manpower with Marlene Dietrich and George Raft, in which Robinson plays the same role, only as a power line worker.

Pre-Code Hollywood US cinema before the Motion Picture Production Code introduction

Pre-Code Hollywood refers to the brief era in the American film industry between the widespread adoption of sound in pictures in 1929 and the enforcement of the Motion Picture Production Code censorship guidelines, popularly known as the "Hays Code", in mid-1934. Although the Code was adopted in 1930, oversight was poor, and it did not become rigorously enforced until July 1, 1934, with the establishment of the Production Code Administration (PCA). Before that date, movie content was restricted more by local laws, negotiations between the Studio Relations Committee (SRC) and the major studios, and popular opinion, than by strict adherence to the Hays Code, which was often ignored by Hollywood filmmakers.

Melodrama Dramatic work that exaggerates plot and characters in order to appeal to the emotions

A melodrama is a dramatic work in which the plot, which is typically sensational and designed to appeal strongly to the emotions, takes precedence over detailed characterization. Characters are often simply drawn, and may appear stereotyped. Melodramas are typically set in the private sphere of the home, and focus on morality and family issues, love, and marriage, often with challenges from an outside source, such as a "temptress”, an aristocratic villain.

Howard Hawks American film director, producer and screenwriter

Howard Winchester Hawks was an American film director, producer and screenwriter of the classic Hollywood era. Critic Leonard Maltin called him "the greatest American director who is not a household name."

Contents

The film's leading lady, Zita Johann, is best known for her role opposite Boris Karloff in Karl Freund's The Mummy that same year.

Leading lady female lead in a film or play or female love interest or renowned actress

Leading lady is a term often applied to the leading actress in the performance if her character is the protagonist. It is also an informal term for the actress who plays a secondary lead, usually a love interest, to the leading actor in a film or play.

Boris Karloff English actor

William Henry Pratt, better known by his stage name Boris Karloff, was an English actor who was primarily known for his roles in horror films. He portrayed Frankenstein's monster in Frankenstein (1931), Bride of Frankenstein (1935) and Son of Frankenstein (1939). He also appeared as Imhotep in The Mummy (1932).

Karl Freund German film director and cinematographer

Karl W. Freund, A.S.C. was a German Jewish cinematographer and film director best known for photographing Metropolis (1927), Dracula (1931), and television's I Love Lucy (1951-1957). Freund was an innovator in the field of cinematography and is credited with the invention of the unchained camera technique.

Premise

The plot concerns a one-handed tuna fisherman named Mike (Robinson) whose wife falls for the man he lost his hand saving.

Tuna tribe of fishes

A tuna is a saltwater fish that belongs to the tribe Thunnini, a subgrouping of the Scombridae (mackerel) family. The Thunnini comprise 15 species across five genera, the sizes of which vary greatly, ranging from the bullet tuna up to the Atlantic bluefin tuna. The bluefin averages 2 m (6.6 ft), and is believed to live up to 50 years.

Cast

Edward G. Robinson Romanian American actor

Edward G. Robinson was an American actor of stage and screen during Hollywood's Golden Age. He appeared in 40 Broadway plays and more than 100 films during a 50-year career and is best remembered for his tough-guy roles as gangsters in such films as Little Caesar and Key Largo.

Richard Arlen actor

Richard Arlen was an American actor of film and television.

Zita Johann actress

Zita Johann was an Austrian-American actress, best known for her performance in Karl Freund's 1932 film, The Mummy, with Boris Karloff.

Box Office

According to Warner Bros records the film earned $436,000 domestically and $443,000 foreign. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Warner Bros financial information in The William Shaefer Ledger. See Appendix 1, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, (1995) 15:sup1, 1-31 p 13 DOI: 10.1080/01439689508604551
  2. Sala, Ángel (October 2005). "Apéndices". Tiburón ¡Vas a necesitar un barco más grande! El filme que cambió Hollywood (1st ed.). Festival Internacional de Cinema de Catalunya. p. 114. ISBN   84-96129-72-1.

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