Tiger Shark (film)

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Tiger Shark
Tiger Shark 1932 poster.jpg
1932 Theatrical Poster
Directed by Howard Hawks
Produced by Bryan Foy
Written by
Screenplay by Wells Root
Story by Houston Branch
Starring
Music by Bernhard Kaun
Cinematography Tony Gaudio
Edited by Thomas Pratt
Distributed by First National Pictures
Release date
  • September 22, 1932 (1932-09-22)(U.S.)
Running time
77 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$375,000 [1]
Box office$879,000 [1]

Tiger Shark is a 1932 American pre-Code melodrama romantic film directed by Howard Hawks and starring Edward G. Robinson, Richard Arlen and Zita Johann. [2] The film was made the same year as Scarface , which is widely acknowledged to be the director's best film of the early sound era. The general storyline was repeated several times in subsequent films, most notably Manpower with Marlene Dietrich and George Raft, in which Robinson plays the same role, only as a power line worker.

Contents

The film's leading lady, Zita Johann, is best known for her role opposite Boris Karloff in Karl Freund's The Mummy that same year.

Plot

The plot concerns a one-handed tuna fisherman named Mike (Robinson) whose wife falls for the man he lost his hand saving.

Cast

Box Office

According to Warner Bros records the film earned $436,000 domestically and $443,000 foreign. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Warner Bros financial information in The William Shaefer Ledger. See Appendix 1, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, (1995) 15:sup1, 1-31 p 13 DOI: 10.1080/01439689508604551
  2. Sala, Ángel (October 2005). "Apéndices". Tiburón ¡Vas a necesitar un barco más grande! El filme que cambió Hollywood (1st ed.). Festival Internacional de Cinema de Catalunya. p. 114. ISBN   84-96129-72-1.