Tochiazuma Daisuke

Last updated
Tochiazuma Daisuke
栃東 大裕
Tochiazuma Daisuke.jpg
Personal information
BornDaisuke Shiga
(1976-11-09) November 9, 1976 (age 46)
Tokyo, Japan
Height1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Weight155 kg (342 lb; 24.4 st)
Web presence website
Career
Stable Tamanoi
Record560-317-169
DebutNovember, 1994
Highest rankŌzeki (January, 2002)
RetiredMay, 2007
Elder name Tamanoi
Championships 3 (Makuuchi)
1 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
1 (Sandanme)
1 (Jonidan)
1 (Jonokuchi)
Special Prizes Outstanding Performance (3)
Fighting Spirit (2)
Technique (7)
Gold Stars 4
Takanohana II (2)
Musashimaru
Akebono
* Up to date as of May 2007.

Tochiazuma Daisuke (born November 9, 1976 as Daisuke Shiga in Tokyo, Japan) is a retired sumo wrestler. He began his professional career in 1994, reaching the top division just two years later after winning a tournament championship in each of the lower divisions. After winning twelve special prizes and four gold stars, he reached his highest rank of ōzeki in 2002 and won three top division tournament championships before retiring because of health reasons in 2007 at the age of 30. In 2009 he became the head coach of Tamanoi stable.

Contents

Early career

Born in Adachi, Tochiazuma is the youngest son of former sekiwake and January 1972 tournament winner Tochiazuma Tomoyori, who was the first bearer of the Tochiazuma shikona (fighting name). After his career, Daisuke's father became an elder in the Japan Sumo Association with the name Tamanoi Tomoyori and began his own sumo stable, of which his son was a member.

The younger Tochiazuma entered professional sumo in November 1994, using his birth name as a shikona. He had a remarkably rapid rise, winning his first 26 matches (equalling Itai's record) and reaching the jūryō division in May 1996, only nine tournaments after his debut. At that point he adopted his father's old shikona. He broke into the top makuuchi division at the end of that year and won the Fighting Spirit prize in his first tournament. In July 1997, Tochiazuma was promoted to the prestigious san'yaku ranks and was a sekiwake for much of the time during the following years, although he bounced back and forth a few times due to injuries. He earned 12 sanshō prizes, including seven for Technique.

Ōzeki

After three double figure scores and two consecutive runner-up performances Tochiazuma was promoted to ōzeki for the first time in January 2002, and instantly won the tournament – exactly 30 years after his father's own championship. He was the first ōzeki since Kiyokuni in 1969 to win the championship on his ōzeki debut. [1] He also became the first wrestler since Haguroyama in 1941 to win the tournament championship in all six professional sumo divisions. [1] Tochiazuma's other top division championship victories occurred in November 2003 and January 2006. However, he never won two consecutive tournaments, nor could he achieve an "equivalent performance" over three tournaments, which is needed for promotion to the top yokozuna rank. His January 2006 success brought Asashōryū's record run of seven consecutive tournament victories to an end, but Tochiazuma could manage only third place in the following tournament. It also proved to be the last top division championship won by a Japanese born wrestler for ten years. [2]

Tochiazuma during the presentation of trophies for his January 2006 yusho. United Arab Emirates trophy (sumo).jpg
Tochiazuma during the presentation of trophies for his January 2006 yūshō.

Tochiazuma holds the record for the number of times a wrestler has achieved promotion to the ōzeki rank after being demoted. He lost his ōzeki rank twice following injuries, but both times he came back by scoring at least ten wins in the next tournament. He is the only wrestler who has succeeded in doing so since the introduction of the current rules on ōzeki promotion and demotion in 1969. His final promotion to ōzeki in 2005 was especially spectacular, as even his own stable had suggested that the scapula injury he suffered in November 2004 could have meant the end of his career.

He had great strength as well as technical skill, and was one of the few wrestlers to regularly trouble Asashōryū when he was at his peak as a yokozuna, defeating him six times between 2003 and 2006. [3]

Fighting style

Tochiazuma had an all-round style, equally adept at yotsu (grappling) techniques, and tsuki/oshi (thrusting and pushing) techniques. Early in his career he was regarded as an oshi-sumo specialist, and oshi-dashi (push out) was the kimarite he used most often overall, but he also won many bouts by yori-kiri or force out. His favourite grip on the mawashi was hidari-yotsu (right hand outside, left hand inside), and he was fond of using uwatenage (overarm throw) and uwatedashinage (pulling outer arm throw).

Retirement from sumo

As a ringside judge in 2018 Tochiazuma Daisuke20180909.jpg
As a ringside judge in 2018

At the end of 2006, Tochiazuma underwent knee surgery, leaving him with little time to prepare for the 2007 New Year tournament. He managed only five wins there, but preserved his ōzeki status with eight wins in March. However, he pulled out of that tournament on the 12th day and was admitted to hospital, complaining of headaches and dizziness. He was diagnosed with high blood pressure and a brain scan revealed he had also suffered a mild stroke. On May 7, 2007, Tochiazuma announced his retirement from sumo. [4] He kept his ring name as he made the transition into his role as oyakata, as ōzeki are permitted to do so for three years.

Tochiazuma's danpatsu-shiki, or official retirement ceremony, took place on 2 February 2008 at the Ryōgoku Kokugikan, with around 10,000 people in attendance. Coming from Tokyo, he naturally had a huge supporters network in the capital, and the event was a sell-out. He had lost a noticeable amount of weight since his retirement.

Upon his father's retirement in September 2009 he became Tamanoi-oyakata and took over the running of Tamanoi stable. In July 2011 he produced his first top division wrestler, Fujiazuma, and veteran Yoshiazuma also won promotion in the following tournament. In 2013 the Mongolian-born Azumaryū reached the top division, and he is the only sekitori in the stable as of 2017. Tamanoi-oyakata is also a Deputy Director of the Japan Sumo Association, responsible for the running of the regional tours or jungyō.

Family

He was married in December 2008 to a 31-year-old former office worker and the reception was held in February 2009. Their first child, a daughter, was born in February 2012.

Career record

Tochiazuma Daisuke [5]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1994 xxxxx(Maezumo)
1995 WestJonokuchi#47
403
 
EastJonokuchi#3
70
Champion

 
EastJonidan#20
70PP
Champion

 
EastSandanme#32
70P
Champion

 
EastMakushita#23
34
 
WestMakushita#31
70
Champion

 
1996 WestMakushita#3
52
 
EastMakushita#2
52
 
EastJūryō#12
105
 
EastJūryō#6
105
 
WestJūryō#3
123
Champion

 
WestMaegashira#15
105
F
1997 WestMaegashira#10
96
 
WestMaegashira#4
69
 
EastMaegashira#6
114
F
WestKomusubi#2
96
T
WestSekiwake#1
105
T
EastSekiwake#1
78
 
1998 WestSekiwake#1
114
O
EastSekiwake#1
249
 
WestMaegashira#5
Sat out due to injury
0015
WestMaegashira#5
87
WestMaegashira#1
87
 
EastMaegashira#1
105
T
1999 WestKomusubi#1
96
 
EastKomusubi#1
87
 
EastKomusubi#1
105
 
EastSekiwake#2
69
 
EastMaegashira#1
105
O
WestSekiwake#1
105
T
2000 WestSekiwake#1
87
 
WestSekiwake#2
87
 
WestSekiwake#1
96
 
WestSekiwake#1
123
T
EastSekiwake#1
249
 
WestMaegashira#4
Sat out due to injury
0015
2001 WestMaegashira#4
105
 
EastKomusubi#1
96
O
WestSekiwake#1
96
 
EastSekiwake#1
105
T
EastSekiwake#1
123
 
EastSekiwake#1
123
T
2002 WestŌzeki#2
132P
 
EastŌzeki#1
105
 
WestŌzeki#1
105
 
EastŌzeki#2
3210
 
WestŌzeki#1
Sat out due to injury
0015
EastŌzeki#3
87
 
2003 EastŌzeki#2
069
 
WestŌzeki#1
Sat out due to injury
0015
WestŌzeki#2
87
 
WestŌzeki#2
78
 
WestŌzeki#2
105
 
WestŌzeki#1
132
 
2004 EastŌzeki#1
96
 
EastŌzeki#2
0312
 
WestŌzeki#2
Sat out due to injury
0015
WestSekiwake#2
105
 
WestŌzeki#2
2211
 
WestŌzeki#2
339
 
2005 WestSekiwake#2
114
 
WestŌzeki#2
105
 
WestŌzeki#1
123
 
EastŌzeki#1
96
 
WestŌzeki#1
105
 
EastŌzeki#1
2211
 
2006 EastŌzeki#2
141
 
EastŌzeki#1
123
 
EastŌzeki#1
258
 
WestŌzeki#3
87
 
WestŌzeki#3
96
 
EastŌzeki#2
105
 
2007 WestŌzeki#1
510
 
WestŌzeki#3
843
 
WestŌzeki#2
Retired
00
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi; P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira

See also

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The following are the events in professional sumo during 2009.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2007.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2006.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2005.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2004.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2003.

The following are the events in professional sumo during 2002.

References

  1. 1 2 Newton, Clyde (2002-01-28). "Tochiazuma downs Chiyotaikai in playoff to take New Year title". Japan Times Online. Retrieved 2007-09-14.
  2. Buckton, Mark (10 November 2011). "The next big thing, and one that never quite made it". Japan Times. Retrieved 28 November 2011.
  3. "Tochiazuma bouts by opponent". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 26 August 2009.
  4. "Ozeki Tochiazuma to retire from sumo". Mainichi Daily News. 2007-05-07. Retrieved 2007-05-09.[ permanent dead link ]
  5. "Tochiazuma Daisuke Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-07-31.