Tolida

Last updated

Tolida
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Suborder:
Family:
Subfamily:
Tribe:
Genus:
Tolida

Mulsant, 1856
Species:
T. artemisiae
Binomial name
Tolida artemisiae
Mulsant, 1856

Tolida artemisiae is a species of beetle in the family Mordellidae, the only species in the genus Tolida. [1]

Beetle Order of insects

Beetles are a group of insects that form the order Coleoptera, in the superorder Endopterygota. Their front pair of wings are hardened into wing-cases, elytra, distinguishing them from most other insects. The Coleoptera, with about 400,000 species, is the largest of all orders, constituting almost 40% of described insects and 25% of all known animal life-forms; new species are discovered frequently. The largest of all families, the Curculionidae (weevils) with some 83,000 member species, belongs to this order. Found in almost every habitat except the sea and the polar regions, they interact with their ecosystems in several ways: beetles often feed on plants and fungi, break down animal and plant debris, and eat other invertebrates. Some species are serious agricultural pests, such as the Colorado potato beetle, while others such as Coccinellidae eat aphids, scale insects, thrips, and other plant-sucking insects that damage crops.

Mordellidae family of insects

The Mordellidae are a family of beetles commonly known as tumbling flower beetles for the typical irregular movements they make when escaping predators, or as pintail beetles due to their abdominal tip which aids them in performing these tumbling movements. Worldwide, there are about 1500 species.

Related Research Articles

Scraptiidae family of insects

The family Scraptiidae is a small group of beetles sometimes called false flower beetles. There are about 400 species in 30 genera with a world-wide distribution. The adults are found on flowers, sometimes in large numbers. These beetles are very common and easily confused with members of the related family Mordellidae.

Isotrilophus erraticus is a species of beetle in the family Mordellidae, the only species in the genus Isotrilophus.

Calycina is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Conaliamorpha lutea is a species of beetles in the family Mordellidae, the only species in the genus Conaliamorpha.

Glipidiomorpha is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

<i>Hoshihananomia</i> genus of insects

Hoshihananomia is a genus of tumbling flower beetles in the family Mordellidae. There are at least 40 described species in Hoshihananomia.

Liaoximordella hongi is a species of beetle in the family Mordellidae, the only species in the genus Liaoximordella.

Neocurtimorda is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Paratomoxia is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Pseudotomoxia is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Dellamora is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Glipostena is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Mordellina is a genus of tumbling flower beetles in the family Mordellidae.

Mordellistenoda is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Neomordellistena is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Pselaphostena is a genus of beetles in the family Mordellidae, containing the following species:

Mordellinae subfamily of insects

Mordellinae is a subfamily of beetles commonly known as tumbling flower beetles for the typical irregular movements they make when escaping predators, or as pintail beetles due to their abdominal tip which aids them in performing these tumbling movements.

The Stenaliini are a tribe of beetles in the family Mordellidae.

The Conaliini are a tribe of beetles in the family Mordellidae.

References

  1. Mordellidae Species List at Joel Hallan’s Biology Catalog. Texas A&M University, archived from the original on 7 October 2014, retrieved 8 August 2015