Tonkin Asian frog

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Tonkin Asian frog
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Dicroglossidae
Genus: Quasipaa
Species:
Q. delacouri
Binomial name
Quasipaa delacouri
(Angel, 1928)
Synonyms

Chaparana delacouri(Angel, 1928)
Annandia delacouri(Angel, 1928)
Rana microlineataBourret, 1937
Paa microlineata(Bourret, 1937)

The Tonkin Asian frog (Quasipaa delacouri) is a species of frog in the family Dicroglossidae. Based on its known distribution, it is endemic to northern Vietnam, although it is considered likely that it also occurs in adjacent Laos and China. [2] This poorly known species is presumed to be associated with small streams (its habitat in the Tam Đảo National Park). Possible threats include collection for human consumption and habitat loss. [1]

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<i>Quasipaa spinosa</i> Species of amphibian

Quasipaa spinosa is a species of frog in the family Dicroglossidae. It is known under many common names, including Chinese spiny frog, giant spiny frog, Chinese edible frog, and spiny paa frog. Its names refer to the distinctive characteristics of the species, relatively large size and the spiny chest of male frogs. Giant in frog terms only, it can nevertheless grow to lengths above 10 cm (4 in); this makes it the largest frog in Hong Kong.

<i>Quasipaa verrucospinosa</i> Species of frog

Quasipaa verrucospinosa is a species of frog in the family Dicroglossidae. It is found in Laos, Vietnam, and Yunnan, China. It occurs in and around streams in hill and lower montane evergreen forests. It is believed to be relatively common, but it is threatened by collection for consumption and—presumably—habitat loss driven by logging, causing degradation of forest habitat and stream sedimentation.

Fuelleborn's stream frog or long-toed grass frog is a species of frog in the family Pyxicephalidae. It is found in the mountains of Malawi, Tanzania, and northeastern Zambia. Its natural habitats are montane grasslands at elevations of 1,500–3,000 m (4,900–9,800 ft) above sea level. Outside the breeding season, it can be found far from water. During the breeding season, males call from flooded grass. The egg clusters are laid just above streams, underneath dense vegetation. Tadpoles develop in the streams.

<i>Quasipaa</i> Genus of amphibians

Quasipaa is a genus of frogs in the family Dicroglossidae. The genus has no established common name, but many individual species are referred to as spiny frogs. They occur in East and Southeast Asia, from Thailand and Cambodia to southern and eastern China.

Quasipaa acanthophora is a species of frogs in the family Dicroglossidae. It is endemic to northern Vietnam and know from two locations, its type locality Mau Son in the Lang Son Province, and the Tay Yen Tu Nature Reserve in the Bac Giang Province. It is a sibling species of Quasipaa spinosa.

References

  1. 1 2 IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group. 2017. Quasipaa delacouri. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017: e.T58243A63899770. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-2.RLTS.T58243A63899770.en. Downloaded on 29 September 2017.
  2. Frost, Darrel R. (2013). "Quasipaa delacouri (Angel, 1928)". Amphibian Species of the World 5.6, an Online Reference. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 16 December 2013.