Toodle-Fucking-Oo

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"Toodle-Fucking-Oo"
The Sopranos episode
Episode no.Season 2
Episode 3
Directed by Lee Tamahori
Written by Frank Renzulli
Cinematography by Phil Abraham
Production code203
Original air dateJanuary 30, 2000
Running time50 minutes
Guest appearance(s)

see below

Episode chronology
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"Do Not Resuscitate"
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"Commendatori"
The Sopranos (season 2)
List of The Sopranos episodes

"Toodle-Fucking-Oo" is the sixteenth episode of the HBO original series The Sopranos and the third of the show's second season. It was written by Frank Renzulli, directed by Lee Tamahori and originally aired on January 30, 2000.

Contents

Starring

Guest starring

Synopsis

Dr. Melfi has been dining in a restaurant with some female friends and is a little tipsy. She sees Tony at a table with a group of men as she is leaving. She pauses and there is an awkward attempt at small talk. As she leaves she waves and calls "Toodle-oo!" The men make crude comments about her and Tony pretends she is an old girlfriend. Melfi is mortified by her behavior, and acknowledges to her therapist, Dr. Elliot Kupferberg, that in order to evade her responsibility as a therapist, she behaved like "a ditzy young girl."

Meadow throws a party for a few friends in Livia's house. A lot of uninvited people show up, there is drug abuse and heavy drinking, and the police arrive. One of the officers knows Tony and contacts him. Tony finds Meadow drunk and drives her home. He and Carmela do not know how to punish her. She prompts them to take away her credit card for three weeks, while still providing cash for gas. She walks away, smiling to herself.

At first, Janice defends Meadow, saying she is showing her independence. But when she sees the state of the house, she is furious. Tony and Carmela tell her to stop interfering. Janice says she ought to leave, but she and Carmela later reconcile and she is persuaded to continue to stay at the house. Meadow overhears their argument. When Tony goes to the house to have the locks changed, Meadow is kneeling on the floor, scrubbing. Tony turns away, perplexed by this remorse.

Jackie Aprile's elder brother Richie is released after ten years' imprisonment. He says he has changed, taken up meditation and learned yoga, but he cannot accept other changes: that Tony, a younger man, is boss, and that he does not immediately get the same benefits as before. When Tony says these things will come in time, Richie says, "What's mine is not yours to give me."

Richie demands payments from a former associate, "Beansie" Gaeta, now the proprietor of some pizzerias. Beansie refuses; Richie viciously assaults him. One night, he waits in a parking lot, draws his gun, and tells Beansie to show him proper respect. Beansie manages to escape. Later, thinking it is safe, he returns to his car. Richie drives up fast and rams into him; then, as he lies on the ground, drives over him. In the hospital, Beansie is told he may never walk again. Tony tells Richie emphatically, "I'm the one who calls the shots," and if he does not show respect they "have a problem, a bad one."

Richie meets with Junior, and says, "I'm yours, Junior. Whatever, whoever. You just say it." He happens to meet Janice at a yoga class, and tries to revive the intimacy they had years ago.

First appearances

Title reference

Production

Connections to future episodes

Cultural references

Music

Filming locations

Listed in order of first appearance: [1]

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References

  1. Ugoku. "The Sopranos location guide - Filming locations for". www.sopranos-locations.com. Retrieved 2020-03-29.