Trading Post (newspaper)

Last updated

Trading Post
FrequencyWeekly
Publisher Telstra
FounderCharles Falkiner
Margaret Wilkins
First issue1966
Final issue2009
CountryAustralia
Based in Melbourne
Language Australian English
Website www.tradingpost.com.au
ISSN 0736-3451

The Trading Post was a classified advertisement newspaper first published in Melbourne in 1966, named for the generic concept of a trading post. After changing hands a number of times, in 2004, the company (which had grown nationally to 22 print publications and five related websites) was bought for $636 million by Telstra. In April 2009, it ceased printing altogether and moved to an online format only.

Contents

History

Melbourne

The original founders of the Trading Post, Charles Falkiner and Margaret Wilkins, started the newspaper in 1966 using an initial outlay of $24,000. [1] [2] In 1968, the newspaper expanded operations in both Sydney and Brisbane, with the Adelaide, Perth, Tasmania, Darwin and Canberra editions were established during the 1980s and 1990s. [3] It first went online in 1996, then changed hands numerous times before being purchased in 1998 by Trader Media, a Dutch-owned company. [1]

Adelaide

A suburban Adelaide edition, selling or buying used goods, was published fortnightly (later weekly) under various names for 41 years:

A number of rural (country) South Australian editions, using the same format, were also published:

The State Library of South Australia has physical and microfilm versions of the South Australian version of the publication available from edition 1 (March 1978). [4]

In March 2004, the Trading Post was bought by Telstra for $636 million. [12] At the time of sale, the company had grown nationally to 22 print publications and five related websites. [13] In October 2009, in the face of a massive shift to virtual advertising, it moved to being a website based publication only. At the time of transition, it had an average of 469,000 readers a week while the website received 1.8 million unique hits per month. [13] According to Telstra at the time of the sale, "the most popular Trading Post categories are pets and horses, household furniture and goods, wheels, tyres and parts, home renovations, rural and machinery, gardens and outdoor living, business and office, and sport, leisure and recreation." [3] The shift, however, resulted in 279 positions across nine locations being made redundant. [1]

In 2012, an attempt to sell the business to Carsales collapsed after the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission opposed it. [14] [15]

The Trading Post was referenced in the 1997 Australian movie, The Castle. [12] [13] [16]

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Balaklava, South Australia</span> Town in South Australia

The town of Balaklava is located in South Australia, 92 kilometres north of Adelaide in the Mid North region. It is on the south bank of the Wakefield River, 25 kilometres east of Port Wakefield.

The Chronicle was a South Australian weekly newspaper, printed from 1858 to 1975, which evolved through a series of titles. It was printed by the publishers of The Advertiser, its content consisting largely of reprints of articles and Births, Marriages and Deaths columns from the parent newspaper. Its target demographic was country areas where mail delivery was infrequent, and businesses which serviced those areas.

The Recorder is a newspaper published in Port Pirie, South Australia since 1885. Formed by an amalgamation in 1898, it was also previously known as Port Pirie Recorder and North Western Mail between 1898 and 1918, and as The Recorder from 1919. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

<i>The Bunyip</i> Weekly newspaper published in Gawler, South Australia

The Bunyip is a weekly newspaper, first printed on 5 September 1863, and originally published and printed in Gawler, South Australia. Its distribution area includes the Gawler, Barossa, Light, Playford, and Adelaide Plains areas. Along with The Murray Pioneer, The River News, and The Loxton News,The Bunyip was now owned by the Taylor Group of Newspapers and printed in Renmark.

<i>The Southern Cross</i> (South Australia)

The Southern Cross is the official publication of the Catholic Archdiocese of Adelaide. About 5000 copies are printed monthly and distributed to parishes, schools and agencies, besides an online version. It began in July 1889 as a weekly magazine published in Adelaide, South Australia, for the Catholic Archdiocese of Adelaide, and remained a weekly for most of its history. Its banner was subtitled A weekly record of Catholic, Irish and General Intelligence, and later Organ of the Catholic Church in South Australia. The current, non-print website version of the magazine also bears the name Southern Cross.

The Naracoorte Herald is a weekly newspaper first published in Naracoorte, South Australia on 14 December 1875. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

The Times and Northern Advertiser was a weekly newspaper published in Peterborough, South Australia from August 1887 to 1970.

The Transcontinental is a weekly newspaper published in Port Augusta, South Australia which dates from October 1914. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

TheBorder Chronicle is a weekly newspaper published in Bordertown, South Australia from June 1908 to the present day. Its head office is in Smith Street, Naracoorte. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

The Australische Zeitung was a weekly German-language newspaper published in Tanunda, South Australia from 1860 until it ceased publication during World War I in 1916 due to anti-German sentiment. The newspaper also existed in a variety of earlier names or merged publications, reflecting the fluid nature of the newspaper industry in Victorian gold rush era colonial South Australia. The long history of German language Australian newspapers reflects the considerable German-speaking population which settled in South Australia in the nineteenth century.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Deni Varnhagen</span> Australian rules footballer

Deni Varnhagen is an Australian rules footballer playing for the Adelaide Football Club in the AFL Women's competition. She is currently inactive from the AFLW for refusing a COVID-19 Vaccination. Deni is amongst a group of South Australians undertaking a legal review of vaccine mandates and their validity in the Supreme Court of South Australia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tyson Stengle</span> Australian rules footballer

Tyson Stengle is a professional Australian rules footballer who plays for the Geelong Cats in the Australian Football League (AFL). Stengle played junior representative football with Woodville-West Torrens in the SANFL and represented South Australia at national championships at under 18 level. He was drafted by the Richmond Tigers in the 2017 rookie draft, made his AFL debut in round 15, 2017 and was traded to the Adelaide Crows in the 2018 trade period. He was delisted by Adelaide prior to the 2021 AFL season, but proceeded to join the Geelong Cats in 2022, winning the premiership with them that year.

The Eyre Peninsula Tribune was a weekly newspaper published in Cleve, South Australia, founded in late 1910 and published from March 1911 to April 9, 2020. From 1911 to 1950 it was titled Eyre's Peninsula Tribune, reflecting a time when South Australia's peninsulas were referred to using possessives. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

The West Coast Sentinel is a weekly newspaper published Thursdays in Ceduna, South Australia. It was founded in mid-1912, and has been published continuously since then. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

The Port Lincoln Times is a newspaper published weekly in Port Lincoln, South Australia. It was first printed in August 1927, and has been published continuously ever since. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

The Murray Valley Standard is a bi-weekly newspaper published in Murray Bridge, South Australia, founded in late 1934 and published continuously since then. Its main office is on Adelaide Road, Murray Bridge. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

The Flinders News is a weekly newspaper published in Port Pirie, South Australia, formed from the historic mergers of multiple Mid-North publications and representing a combined ancestry of 12 former publications. Its earliest constituent publication, the Northern Mail, was first issued on 30 June 1876, and the newspaper has been published under its current title since 1989. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

Coastal Leader is a weekly newspaper published in Kingston, South Australia, founded in 1962 and published under this title since 2001. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

The Herald is a weekly newspaper published in Tanunda, South Australia. With its earliest beginnings in 1860, it has been published under the Herald banner since 2005. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

The Stock Journal is a weekly newspaper published in Adelaide, South Australia, and published continuously since 1967. A predecessor publication, the Adelaide Stock and Station Journal, dates back to August 1904. It was later sold to Rural Press, previously owned by Fairfax Media, but now an Australian media company trading as Australian Community Media.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Trading Post print run ends". ABC News . 30 September 2009. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  2. "AM - Founder of Trading Post discusses sale". www.abc.net.au. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  3. 1 2 Oakes, Dan (30 September 2009). "Dream over for Trading Post". Sydney Morning Herald . Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  4. 1 2 "The Adelaide private trader [newspaper]". State Library of South Australia. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  5. "20th century newspapers in the Adelaide region South Australia". www.jaunay.com. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  6. Laube, Anthony. "LibGuides: SA Newspapers: A-B". guides.slsa.sa.gov.au. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  7. Adelaide trading post. Redwood Park [S. Aust.] : Adelaide Trading Post. 1968.
  8. "Adelaide trading post [newspaper]". State Library of South Australia. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  9. Adelaide trading post. Hillcrest, SA : Adelaide Private Trader. 1985.
  10. "Weekly trading post [newspaper]". State Library of South Australia. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  11. "Trading post [newspaper]". State Library of South Australia. Retrieved 17 August 2018.
  12. 1 2 "Trading Post's paper demise was on the cards". ABC News. 29 October 2009. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  13. 1 2 3 "Trading Post dumps paper edition, fully online". The Courier Mail. 30 September 2009. Retrieved 18 August 2018.
  14. ACCC to oppose Carsales acquisition of Trading Post Australian Competition & Consumer Commission 20 December 2012
  15. ACCC opposes Carsales's Trading Post deal ABC News 20 December 2012
  16. "Trading Post published for last time". Australian Broadcasting Corporation . 29 October 2009. Retrieved 18 August 2018.

{