UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying Group C

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Group C of UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying was one of the ten groups to decide which teams would qualify for the UEFA Euro 2020 finals tournament. [1] Group C consisted of five teams: Belarus, Estonia, Germany, Netherlands and Northern Ireland, [2] where they played against each other home-and-away in a round-robin format. [3]

Contents

The top two teams, Germany and Netherlands, qualified directly for the finals. Unlike previous editions, the participants of the play-offs were not decided based on results from the qualifying group stage, but instead based on their performance in the 2018–19 UEFA Nations League.

Standings

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification Flag of Germany.svg Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ulster Banner.svg Flag of Belarus.svg Flag of Estonia.svg
1Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 8701307+2321Qualify for final tournament 2–4 6–1 4–0 8–0
2Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 8611247+1719 2–3 3–1 4–0 5–0
3Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 8413913413Advance to play-offs via Nations League 0–2 0–0 2–1 2–0
4Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 8116416124 0–2 1–2 0–1 0–0
5Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia 8017226241 0–3 0–4 1–2 1–2
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

Matches

The fixtures were released by UEFA the same day as the draw, which was held on 2 December 2018 in Dublin. [4] [5] Times are CET/CEST, [note 1] as listed by UEFA (local times, if different, are in parentheses).

Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg4–0Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus
Report
De Kuip, Rotterdam
Attendance: 38,604 [6]
Referee: Davide Massa (Italy)
Northern Ireland  Ulster Banner.svg2–0Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia
Report
Windsor Park, Belfast
Attendance: 18,176 [6]
Referee: Ivan Bebek (Croatia)

Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg2–3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Report
Johan Cruyff Arena, Amsterdam
Attendance: 51,694 [6]
Referee: Jesús Gil Manzano (Spain)
Northern Ireland  Ulster Banner.svg2–1Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus
Report
Windsor Park, Belfast
Attendance: 18,188 [6]
Referee: Paweł Raczkowski (Poland)

Estonia  Flag of Estonia.svg1–2Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland
Report
Lilleküla Stadium, Tallinn
Attendance: 8,378 [6]
Referee: Fabio Verissimo (Portugal)
Belarus  Flag of Belarus.svg0–2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Report
Borisov Arena, Barysaw
Attendance: 12,510 [6]
Referee: Srđan Jovanović (Serbia)

Belarus  Flag of Belarus.svg0–1Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland
Report
Borisov Arena, Barysaw
Attendance: 5,250 [6]
Referee: Harald Lechner (Austria)
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg8–0Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia
Report
Opel Arena, Mainz
Attendance: 26,050 [6]
Referee: Ali Palabıyık (Turkey)

Estonia  Flag of Estonia.svg1–2Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus
Report
Lilleküla Stadium, Tallinn
Attendance: 7,314 [6]
Referee: Alain Durieux (Luxembourg)
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg2–4Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Report
Volksparkstadion, Hamburg
Attendance: 51,299 [6]
Referee: Artur Soares Dias (Portugal)

Estonia  Flag of Estonia.svg0–4Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Report
Lilleküla Stadium, Tallinn
Attendance: 11,006 [6]
Referee: Serhiy Boiko (Ukraine)
Northern Ireland  Ulster Banner.svg0–2Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Report
Windsor Park, Belfast
Attendance: 18,326 [6]
Referee: Daniele Orsato (Italy)

Belarus  Flag of Belarus.svg0–0Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia
Report
Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg3–1Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland
Report
De Kuip, Rotterdam
Attendance: 41,348 [6]
Referee: Benoît Bastien (France)

Belarus  Flag of Belarus.svg1–2Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Report
Dinamo Stadium, Minsk
Attendance: 21,639 [6]
Referee: Anastasios Sidiropoulos (Greece)
Estonia  Flag of Estonia.svg0–3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany
Report
Lilleküla Stadium, Tallinn
Attendance: 12,062 [6]
Referee: Georgi Kabakov (Bulgaria)

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg4–0Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus
Report
Borussia-Park, Mönchengladbach
Attendance: 33,164 [6]
Referee: Orel Grinfeld (Israel)
Northern Ireland  Ulster Banner.svg0–0Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Report
Windsor Park, Belfast
Attendance: 18,404 [6]
Referee: Szymon Marciniak (Poland)

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg6–1Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland
Report
Waldstadion, Frankfurt
Attendance: 42,855 [6]
Referee: Carlos del Cerro Grande (Spain)
Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg5–0Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia
Report
Johan Cruyff Arena, Amsterdam
Attendance: 50,386 [6]
Referee: Davide Massa (Italy)

Goalscorers

There were 69 goals scored in 20 matches, for an average of 3.45 goals per match.

8 goals

6 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

Discipline

A player was automatically suspended for the next match for the following offences: [3]

The following suspensions were served during the qualifying matches:

TeamPlayerOffence(s)Suspended for match(es)
Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia Joonas Tamm Yellow card.svg vs Northern Ireland (21 March 2019)
Yellow card.svg vs Germany (11 June 2019)
Yellow card.svg vs Netherlands (9 September 2019)
vs Belarus (10 October 2019)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Emre Can Red card.svg vs Estonia (13 October 2019)vs Belarus (16 November 2019)
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Marten de Roon Yellow card.svg vs Belarus (21 March 2019)
Yellow card.svg vs Germany (6 September 2019)
Yellow card.svg vs Northern Ireland (16 November 2019)
vs Estonia (19 November 2019)

Notes

  1. CET (UTC+1) for matches in March and November 2019, and CEST (UTC+2) for all other matches.

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References

  1. "UEFA Euro 2020: Qualifying Draw Procedure" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 27 September 2018. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  2. "UEFA EURO 2020 qualifying draw made in Dublin". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 2 December 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  3. 1 2 "Regulations of the UEFA European Football Championship 2018–20". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 9 March 2018. Archived from the original on 11 May 2021. Retrieved 11 May 2021.
  4. "UEFA EURO 2020 qualifying schedule: all the fixtures". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 2 December 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  5. "European Qualifiers 2018–20: Group stage fixture list" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 2 December 2018. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 "Summary UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying – Group C". Soccerway. Retrieved 21 November 2019.