UEFA Women's Euro 2017 knockout stage

Last updated

The knockout phase of UEFA Women's Euro 2017 began on 29 July 2017 and ended on 6 August 2017 with the final. [1]

UEFA Womens Euro 2017 2017 edition of the UEFA Womens Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams.

UEFA Womens Euro 2017 Final final-game of the UEFA Womens Euro 2017

The UEFA Women's Euro 2017 Final was a football match to determine the winner of UEFA Women's Euro 2017. The match took place on 6 August 2017 at De Grolsch Veste in Enschede, Netherlands, and was contested by the winners of the semi-finals, the Netherlands and Denmark.

Contents

All times local (UTC+2).

Format

In the knockout stage, extra time and penalty shoot-out are used to decide the winner if necessary. [2]

A penalty shoot-out is a method of determining which team is awarded victory in an association football match that cannot end in a draw, when the score is tied after the regulation playing time as well as extra time have expired. In a penalty shoot-out, each team takes turns shooting at goal from the penalty mark, with the goal only defended by the opposing team's goalkeeper. Each team has five shots which must be taken by different kickers; the team that makes more successful kicks is declared the victor. Shoot-outs finish as soon as one team has an insurmountable lead. If scores are level after five pairs of shots, the shootout progresses into additional "sudden-death" rounds. Balls successfully kicked into the goal during a shoot-out do not count as goals for the individual kickers or the team, and are tallied separately from the goals scored during normal play. Although the procedure for each individual kick in the shoot-out resembles that of a penalty kick, there are some differences. Most notably, neither the kicker nor any player other than the goalkeeper may play the ball again once it has been kicked.

On 1 June 2017, the UEFA Executive Committee agreed that the competition would be part of the International Football Association Board (IFAB)'s trial to allow a fourth substitute to be made during extra time. [3]

The International Football Association Board (IFAB) is the body that determines the Laws of the Game of association football. IFAB was founded in 1886 to agree standardised Laws for international competition, and has since acted as the "guardian" of the internationally used Laws; since its establishment in 1904 FIFA, the sport's top governing body, has recognised IFAB's jurisdiction over the Laws. IFAB is known to take a highly conservative attitude regarding changes to the Laws of the Game.

Substitute (association football) replacement player in association football (soccer)

In association football, a substitute is a player who is brought on to the pitch during a match in exchange for an existing player. Substitutions are generally made to replace a player who has become tired or injured, or who is performing poorly, or for tactical reasons. Unlike some sports, a player who has been substituted during a match may take no further part in it.

Qualified teams

The top two placed teams from each of the four groups, qualified for the knockout stage.

Group Winners Runners-up
A Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
B Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
C Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Flag of France.svg  France
D Flag of England.svg  England Flag of Spain.svg  Spain

Bracket

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
29 July – Doetinchem
 
 
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 2
 
3 August – Enschede
 
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 0
 
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 3
 
30 July – Deventer
 
Flag of England.svg  England 0
 
Flag of England.svg  England 1
 
6 August – Enschede
 
Flag of France.svg  France 0
 
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 4
 
30 July – Rotterdam
 
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 2
 
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 1
 
3 August – Breda
 
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 2
 
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark (p)0 (3)
 
30 July – Tilburg
 
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 0 (0)
 
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria (p)0 (5)
 
 
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 0 (3)
 

Quarter-finals

Netherlands vs Sweden

Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2–0 Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Report
De Vijverberg, Doetinchem
Attendance: 11,106
Referee: Bibiana Steinhaus (Germany)

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Netherlands
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Sweden
GK 1 Sari van Veenendaal
RB 2 Desiree van Lunteren
CB 6 Anouk Dekker
CB 3 Stefanie van der Gragt Sub off.svg 46'
LB 5 Kika van Es
RM 14 Jackie Groenen
CM 10 Daniëlle van de Donk
LM 8 Sherida Spitse (c)
RF 7 Shanice van de Sanden Sub off.svg 76'
CF 9 Vivianne Miedema
LF 11 Lieke Martens Sub off.svg 87'
Substitutions:
DF 4 Mandy van den Berg Sub on.svg 46'
FW 13 Renate Jansen Sub on.svg 76'
FW 21 Lineth Beerensteyn Sub on.svg 87'
Manager:
Sarina Wiegman
NED-SWE (women) 2017-07-29.svg
GK 1 Hedvig Lindahl
RB 15 Jessica Samuelsson Yellowcard.svg 43'
CB 5 Nilla Fischer
CB 3 Linda Sembrant
LB 2 Jonna Andersson Sub off.svg 81'
RM 8 Lotta Schelin (c)
CM 7 Lisa Dahlkvist
CM 17 Caroline Seger
LM 9 Kosovare Asllani Yellowcard.svg 90+2'
CF 11 Stina Blackstenius
CF 18 Fridolina Rolfö Sub off.svg 73'
Substitutions:
MF 14 Hanna Folkesson Sub on.svg 73'
FW 20 Mimmi Larsson Sub on.svg 81'
Manager:
Pia Sundhage

Player of the Match:
Jackie Groenen (Netherlands) [4]

Jackie Groenen Dutch footballer

Jackie Noelle Groenen is a footballer and former judoka who plays for the Netherlands women's national football team and FFC Frankfurt of the Frauen Bundesliga. She previously played for German clubs Essen-Schönebeck and Duisburg, as well as for Chelsea in the English FA WSL. Groenen was born in the Netherlands but grew up just over the Belgian border in Poppel. After playing for the Netherlands at youth level, she changed allegiance to Belgium but world governing body FIFA ruled her ineligible for her new team, so she reverted her allegiance to the Netherlands.

Assistant referees:
Katrin Rafalski (Germany)
Chrysoula Kourompylia (Greece)
Fourth official:
Carina Vitulano (Italy)

Assistant referee (association football) official in association football

In association football, an assistant referee is an official empowered with assisting the referee in enforcing the Laws of the Game during a match. Although assistants are not required under the Laws, at most organised levels of football the match officiating crew consists of the referee and at least two assistant referees. The responsibilities of the various assistant referees are listed in Law 6, "The Other Match Officials". In the current Laws the term "assistant referee" technically refers only to the two officials who generally patrol the touchlines, with the wider range of assistants to the referee given other titles.

German Football Association governing body of association football in Germany

The German Football Association is the governing body of football in Germany. A founding member of both FIFA and UEFA, the DFB has jurisdiction for the German football league system and is in charge of the men's and women's national teams. The DFB headquarters are in Frankfurt am Main. Sole members of the DFB are the German Football League, organising the professional Bundesliga and the 2. Bundesliga, along with five regional and 21 state associations, organising the semi-professional and amateur levels. The 21 state associations of the DFB have a combined number of more than 25,000 clubs with more than 6.8 million members, making the DFB the single largest sports federation in the world.

Hellenic Football Federation governing body of association football in Greece

The Hellenic Football Federation (HFF), also known as the Greek Football Federation, is the governing body of football in Greece. It contributes in the organisation of Superleague Greece and organizes the Greek Cup and the Greece national team. It is based in Athens.

Germany vs Denmark

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 1–2 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Kerschowski Soccerball shade.svg 3' Report

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Germany
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Denmark
GK 1 Almuth Schult
RB 14 Anna Blässe
CB 8 Lena Goeßling
CB 5 Babett Peter
LB 17 Isabel Kerschowski
DM 6 Kristin Demann Sub off.svg 62'
CM 15 Sara Doorsoun Sub off.svg 46'
CM 13 Sara Däbritz
AM 10 Dzsenifer Marozsán (c)
CF 11 Anja Mittag
CF 16 Linda Dallmann Sub off.svg 88'
Substitutions:
MF 20 Lina Magull Sub on.svg 46'
FW 9 Mandy Islacker Sub on.svg 62'
FW 18 Lena Petermann Sub on.svg 88'
Manager:
Steffi Jones
GER-DEN (women) 2017-07-30.svg
GK 1 Stina Lykke Petersen
RB 8 Theresa Nielsen
CB 5 Simone Boye Sørensen
CB 12 Stine Larsen
LB 2 Line Røddik Hansen Sub off.svg 69'
RM 7 Sanne Troelsgaard Nielsen
CM 17 Line Jensen
CM 4 Maja Kildemoes Sub off.svg 66'
LM 11 Katrine Veje
CF 9 Nadia Nadim
CF 10 Pernille Harder (c)
Substitutions:
FW 15 Frederikke Thøgersen Sub on.svg 66'
DF 19 Cecilie Sandvej Sub on.svg 69'
Manager:
Nils Nielsen

Player of the Match:
Theresa Nielsen (Denmark) [4]

Assistant referees:
Judit Kulcsár (Hungary)
Petruta Iugulescu (Romania)
Fourth official:
Lorraine Clark (Scotland)

Hungarian Football Federation association football governing body in Hungary

The Hungarian Football Federation is the governing body of football in Hungary. It organizes the Hungarian league and the Hungarian national team. It is based in Budapest.

Romanian Football Federation association football governing body in Romania

The Romanian Football Federation is Romania's football governing body. It organizes the Romania national football team and most of the Romanian football competitions. Based in the capital city of Bucharest, it has been affiliated to FIFA since 1923 and to UEFA since 1955.

Scottish Football Association governing body of association football in Scotland

The Scottish Football Association, is the governing body of football in Scotland and has the ultimate responsibility for the control and development of football in Scotland. Members of the SFA include clubs in Scotland, affiliated national associations as well as local associations. It was formed in 1873, making it the second oldest national football association in the world. It is not to be confused with the "Scottish Football Union", which is the name that the SRU was known by until the 1920s.

Austria vs Spain

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Austria
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Spain
GK 1 Manuela Zinsberger
RB 6 Katharina Schiechtl
CB 7 Carina Wenninger Yellowcard.svg 75'
CB 11 Viktoria Schnaderbeck (c)
LB 19 Verena Aschauer Yellowcard.svg 119'
CM 9 Sarah Zadrazil Sub off.svg 110'
CM 17 Sarah Puntigam
CM 15 Nicole Billa Sub off.svg 81'
RF 18 Laura Feiersinger
CF 10 Nina Burger
LF 20 Lisa Makas Sub off.svg 42'
Substitutions:
MF 8 Nadine Prohaska Sub on.svg 42'
DF 13 Virginia Kirchberger Sub on.svg 81'
FW 4 Viktoria Pinther Sub on.svg 110'
Manager:
Dominik Thalhammer
AUT-ESP (women) 2017-07-30.svg
GK 13 Sandra Paños
RB 7 Marta Corredera
CB 3 Marta Torrejón (c) Yellowcard.svg 88'
CB 4 Irene Paredes
LB 20 María Pilar León Yellowcard.svg 30'
CM 14 Victoria Losada Sub off.svg 68'
CM 15 Silvia Meseguer
CM 8 Amanda Sampedro
RF 19 Bárbara Latorre Sub off.svg 76'
CF 9 Mari Paz Vilas Sub off.svg 112'
LF 22 Mariona Caldentey Sub off.svg 56'
Substitutions:
FW 17 Olga García Sub on.svg 56'
MF 11 Alexia Putellas Sub on.svg 68'
FW 10 Jennifer Hermoso Sub on.svg 76'
MF 6 Virginia Torrecilla Sub on.svg 112'
Manager:
Jorge Vilda

Player of the Match:
Laura Feiersinger (Austria) [4]

Assistant referees:
Manuela Nicolosi (France)
Sian Massey (England)
Fourth official:
Monika Mularczyk (Poland)

England vs France

England  Flag of England.svg 1–0 Flag of France.svg  France
Taylor Soccerball shade.svg 60' Report
De Adelaarshorst, Deventer
Attendance: 6,283
Referee: Esther Staubli (Switzerland)

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England
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France
GK 1 Karen Bardsley Sub off.svg 75'
RB 2 Lucy Bronze
CB 5 Steph Houghton (c)
CB 16 Millie Bright
LB 3 Demi Stokes
CM 11 Jade Moore
CM 4 Jill Scott Yellowcard.svg 33'
RW 7 Jordan Nobbs
AM 23 Fran Kirby
LW 18 Ellen White
CF 9 Jodie Taylor Yellowcard.svg 62'
Substitutions:
GK 13 Siobhan Chamberlain Sub on.svg 75'
Manager:
Flag of Wales 2.svg Mark Sampson
ENG-FRA (women) 2017-07-30.svg
GK 16 Sarah Bouhaddi
RB 8 Jessica Houara
CB 4 Laura Georges
CB 19 Griedge Mbock Bathy Yellowcard.svg 81'
LB 22 Sakina Karchaoui
RM 20 Kadidiatou Diani Sub off.svg 65'
CM 23 Onema Geyoro
CM 6 Amandine Henry (c)
LM 10 Camille Abily Sub off.svg 78'
CF 18 Marie-Laure Delie Sub off.svg 90'
CF 9 Eugénie Le Sommer
Substitutions:
FW 12 Élodie Thomis Sub on.svg 65'
MF 11 Claire Lavogez Sub on.svg 78'
FW 7 Clarisse Le Bihan Sub on.svg 90'
Manager:
Olivier Echouafni

Player of the Match:
Amandine Henry (France) [4]

Assistant referees:
Belinda Brem (Switzerland)
Sanja Rodjak Karšić (Croatia)
Fourth official:
Lina Lehtovaara (Finland)

Semi-finals

Denmark vs Austria

Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg 0–0 (a.e.t.)Flag of Austria.svg  Austria
Report
Penalties
3–0
Rat Verlegh Stadion, Breda
Attendance: 11,312
Referee: Kateryna Monzul (Ukraine)

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Denmark
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Austria
GK 1 Stina Lykke Petersen
RB 8 Theresa Nielsen
CB 5 Simone Boye Sørensen
CB 12 Stine Larsen
LB 2 Line Røddik Hansen Sub off.svg 46'
RM 7 Sanne Troelsgaard Nielsen
CM 4 Maja Kildemoes Yellowcard.svg 36'Sub off.svg 52'
CM 17 Line Jensen Sub off.svg 69'
LM 11 Katrine Veje Sub off.svg 120+1'
CF 9 Nadia Nadim
CF 10 Pernille Harder (c) Yellowcard.svg 80'
Substitutions:
DF 19 Cecilie Sandvej Sub on.svg 46'
DF 15 Frederikke Thøgersen Sub on.svg 52'
MF 13 Sofie Junge Pedersen Sub on.svg 69'
FW 14 Nicoline Sørensen Sub on.svg 120+1'
Manager:
Nils Nielsen
DEN-AUT (women) 2017-08-03.svg
GK 1 Manuela Zinsberger
CB 6 Katharina Schiechtl Yellowcard.svg 56'
CB 7 Carina Wenninger
CB 13 Virginia Kirchberger
RM 18 Laura Feiersinger
CM 11 Viktoria Schnaderbeck (c)
CM 17 Sarah Puntigam Sub off.svg 91'
LM 19 Verena Aschauer
AM 9 Sarah Zadrazil Yellowcard.svg 97'
CF 10 Nina Burger
CF 15 Nicole Billa Sub off.svg 39'
Substitutions:
MF 8 Nadine Prohaska Sub on.svg 39'
FW 4 Viktoria Pinther Sub on.svg 91'
Manager:
Dominik Thalhammer

Player of the Match:
Stina Lykke Petersen (Denmark) [4]

Assistant referees:
Maryna Striletska (Ukraine)
Petruta Iugulescu (Romania)
Fourth official:
Katalin Kulcsár (Hungary)

Netherlands vs England

Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg 3–0 Flag of England.svg  England
Report
De Grolsch Veste, Enschede
Attendance: 27,093
Referee: Stéphanie Frappart (France)

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Netherlands
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England
GK 1 Sari van Veenendaal
RB 2 Desiree van Lunteren Yellowcard.svg 13'
CB 6 Anouk Dekker
CB 3 Stefanie van der Gragt Sub off.svg 70'
LB 5 Kika van Es
RM 14 Jackie Groenen
CM 10 Daniëlle van de Donk Yellowcard.svg 59'Sub off.svg 90+1'
LM 8 Sherida Spitse (c)
RF 7 Shanice van de Sanden Sub off.svg 89'
CF 9 Vivianne Miedema
LF 11 Lieke Martens
Substitutions:
DF 17 Kelly Zeeman Sub on.svg 70'
FW 13 Renate Jansen Sub on.svg 89'
MF 12 Jill Roord Sub on.svg 90+1'
Manager:
Sarina Wiegman
NED-ENG (women) 2017-08-03.svg
GK 13 Siobhan Chamberlain
RB 2 Lucy Bronze
CB 5 Steph Houghton (c)
CB 16 Millie Bright Yellowcard.svg 15'
LB 3 Demi Stokes
CM 11 Jade Moore Yellowcard.svg 47'Sub off.svg 76'
CM 10 Fara Williams Sub off.svg 67'
RW 7 Jordan Nobbs
AM 23 Fran Kirby
LW 18 Ellen White
CF 9 Jodie Taylor
Substitutions:
FW 19 Toni Duggan Sub on.svg 67'
MF 14 Karen Carney Sub on.svg 76'
Manager:
Flag of Wales 2.svg Mark Sampson

Player of the Match:
Daniëlle van de Donk (Netherlands) [4]

Assistant referees:
Manuela Nicolosi (France)
Chrysoula Kourompylia (Greece)
Fourth official:
Bibiana Steinhaus (Germany)

Final

Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg 4–2 Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Report
De Grolsch Veste, Enschede
Attendance: 28,182 [6]
Referee: Esther Staubli (Switzerland)
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Netherlands
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Denmark
GK 1 Sari van Veenendaal
RB 2 Desiree van Lunteren Sub off.svg 57'
CB 6 Anouk Dekker Yellowcard.svg 43'
CB 3 Stefanie van der Gragt Yellowcard.svg 72'
LB 5 Kika van Es Sub off.svg 90+4'
CM 14 Jackie Groenen Yellowcard.svg 21'
CM 10 Daniëlle van de Donk
CM 8 Sherida Spitse (c)
RF 7 Shanice van de Sanden Sub off.svg 90'
CF 9 Vivianne Miedema
LF 11 Lieke Martens
Substitutions:
DF 20 Dominique Janssen Sub on.svg 57'
FW 13 Renate Jansen Sub on.svg 90'
DF 4 Mandy van den Berg Sub on.svg 90+4'
Manager:
Sarina Wiegman
NED-DEN (women) 2017-08-06.svg
GK 1 Stina Lykke Petersen
RB 8 Theresa Nielsen
CB 5 Simone Boye Sørensen Sub off.svg 77'
CB 12 Stine Larsen
LB 19 Cecilie Sandvej
RM 7 Sanne Troelsgaard Nielsen
CM 4 Maja Kildemoes Sub off.svg 61'
CM 13 Sofie Junge Pedersen Sub off.svg 82'
LM 11 Katrine Veje
CF 10 Pernille Harder (c)
CF 9 Nadia Nadim Yellowcard.svg 45'
Substitutions:
DF 15 Frederikke Thøgersen Sub on.svg 61'
DF 2 Line Røddik Hansen Sub on.svg 77'
MF 6 Nanna Christiansen Sub on.svg 82'
Manager:
Nils Nielsen

Player of the Match:
Sherida Spitse (Netherlands) [4]

Assistant referees: [7]
Belinda Brem (Switzerland)
Sanja Rodjak Karšić (Croatia)
Fourth official:
Bibiana Steinhaus (Germany)
Fifth official:
Katrin Rafalski (Germany)

Notes

  1. The Germany v Denmark match, originally scheduled on 29 July 2017, 20:45 CEST, was postponed to the following day due to adverse weather conditions. [5]

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References