University Physics

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University Physics
University Physics.jpeg
12th edition cover featuring the Millau Viaduct.
Author Hugh Young, Roger Freedman, Francis Sears, Mark Zemansky
Cover artistYvo Riezebos Design
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Genre Physics
Publisher Pearson Education
Publication date
1949
Media typePrint (hardback & paperback)
Pages1632 pp (14th edition, hardcover) [1]
ISBN 978-0-321-50062-5

University Physics is the name of a two-volume physics textbook written by Hugh Young and Roger Freedman. The first edition of University Physics was published by Mark Zemansky and Francis Sears in 1949. [2] Hugh Young became a coauthor with Sears and Zemansky in 1973. Now in its 15th edition, University Physics is among the most widely used introductory textbooks in the world. [3]

Contents

University Physics by Pearson is not to be confused with a free textbook by the same name, available from OpenStax. [4]

Contents

Volume 1. Classic mechanics, Waves/acoustics, and Thermodynamics

Volume 2. Electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics

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References

  1. University Physics. ISBN   0321982584.
  2. "University Physics". Pearson Australia.
  3. "About Hugh D. Young". Archived from the original on 2014-07-28. Retrieved 2014-07-19.
  4. Ling, Samuel; et al. "University Physics". OpenStax. Retrieved 2 April 2018.