Virginia Tech Hokies women's soccer

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Virginia Tech Hokies
Soccerball current event.svg 2019 Virginia Tech Hokies women's soccer team
Virginia Tech Hokies logo.svg
Founded1980;39 years ago (1980)
University Virginia Tech
Head coach Charles Adair (9th season)
Conference ACC
Location Blacksburg, VA
Stadium Sandra D. Thompson Field
(Capacity: 2,500)
Nickname Hokies
ColorsChicago Maroon and Burnt Orange [1]
         
NCAA Tournament College Cup
2013
NCAA Tournament Quarterfinals
2013
NCAA Tournament Round of 16
2009, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2018
NCAA Tournament Round of 32
2009, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2018
NCAA Tournament appearances
2004, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2018, 2019

The Virginia Tech Hokies women's soccer team began in 1980 with two club teams under the guidance of Everett Germain and his two daughter's Betsy and Julie. Virginia Tech's women's soccer became a college soccer program that competes in NCAA Division I in 1993. [2] The team played in the A-10 and the Big East before moving to the Coastal Division of Atlantic Coast Conference in 2014. The team has advanced to the NCAA Women's soccer tournament nine times. Their best appearance is reaching the semifinals in 2013. Their home games are played at Sandra D. Thompson Field. [3]

College soccer form of soccer

College soccer is played by teams composed of soccer players who are enrolled in colleges and universities. While it is most widespread in the United States, it is also prominent in South Korea and Canada. The institutions typically hire full-time professional coaches and staff, although the student athletes are strictly amateur and are not paid. College soccer in the United States is sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the sports regulatory body for major universities, and by the governing bodies for smaller universities and colleges. This sport is played on a rectangular field of the dimensions of about 64m (meters) - 70m sideline to sideline (width), and 100m - 110m goal line to goal line (length).

Atlantic 10 Conference Collegiate athletic conference

The Atlantic 10 Conference (A-10) is a collegiate athletic conference whose schools compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) Division I. The A-10's member schools are located in states mostly on the United States Eastern Seaboard, as well as some in the Midwest – Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, Ohio, and Missouri as well as in the District of Columbia. Although some of its members are state-funded, half of its membership is made up of private, Catholic institutions. Despite the name, there are 14 full-time members, and two affiliate members that participate in women's field hockey only. The current commissioner is Bernadette McGlade, who began her tenure in 2008.

Big East Conference U.S. college athletic conference that began in 2013

The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletic conference that competes in NCAA Division I in all sports except football, which is not sponsored. The conference has been officially recognized as a Division I multi-sport conference, effective on August 1, 2013. The conference was originally founded by Dave Gavitt on May 31, 1979.

Contents

History

1990s

The Virginia Tech Hokies women's soccer team began play under coach Sam Okpodu in 1993. The team had a respectable first season, finishing 6–10–1. The team began play without a conference. A small improvement followed in the team's second season. The Hokies finished with a record of 8–11–0. In 1995 the Hokies would begin play in the Atlantic 10 Conference, where the school was a member in other sports. The move proved difficult, with the Hokies finishing 3–12–3 overall, and 1–3–1 in their first conference season. However, improvement quickly followed, with the team achieving a .500 record in overall play and a winning record in conference play in 1996. The team won 9 games in each season from 1996-1999. Their loss record was remarkably consistent as well, with the Hokies losing 9 games from 1996-1998 and 10 in 1999.

2000s

The decade of the 2000s started in a very similar fashion with the team going 9–10–0. In 2000, the team did not participate in a conference as the university transitioned into joining the Big East Conference. [4] 2001 would be the team's first season in the Big East, and prove a difficult one. The Hokies finished 8–9–3 overall, but 1–8–1 in conference play. After the season, Sam Okpodu would leave as head coach to pursue an opportunity with the Nigerian National Team. Jerry Cheynet would switch from the men's team head coach to coach the women's team. [5] In his only season as head coach, the team would finish 6–11–1 and 2–4 in conference play. Kelly Cagle would take over as the programs third head coach in program history in 2003. She would achieve a 9–9 record in her first season. 2004 would prove to be a turning point year for the Hokies. First, the school joined the Atlantic Coast Conference. [6] In their first year in the ACC, the team would achieve their first winning season in program history, finishing 11–9–0. Additionally, they would qualify for their first postseason, qualifying for both the ACC Tournament and the NCAA Tournament. The 2004 postseason qualification was not followed up until 2008. The team posted losing records in 2005 and 2006. Despite a 8–7–3 record in 2007, the Hokies did not qualify for either tournament. In 2008, the Hokies were runners up in the ACC Tournament, their best finish in program history. They also began a run of qualifying for 8 straight NCAA tournaments in 2008. The decade closed with a program best for wins, with 16. The previous record was 2004, with 11. The Hokies also achieved only their second winning conference record in 2009.

Jerry Cheynet is the current director of soccer operations at Virginia Tech. He is most notable for being a highly successful soccer coach at Virginia Tech, from 1974 to 2001. He took over the program in just its third year of existence, and remains by far the school's winningest soccer coach. He compiled a 238-212-37 record overall as head coach for the Hokies. He was named Atlantic 10 coach of the year in 1997, for leading the team to a 14-5-1 record that year.

Kelly Cagle is an American former professional soccer player who featured as a forward and midfielder and was a member of the United States women's national soccer team.

Atlantic Coast Conference American collegiate athletics conference

The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is a collegiate athletic conference located in the Southern United States. Based in Greensboro, North Carolina, the conference consists of fifteen member universities, each of whom compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)'s Division I, with its football teams competing in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), the highest levels for athletic competition in US-based collegiate sports. The ACC sponsors competition in twenty-five sports with many of its member institutions' athletic programs held in high regard nationally. Current members of the conference are Boston College, Clemson University, Duke University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Florida State University, North Carolina State University, Syracuse University, the University of Louisville, the University of Miami, the University of North Carolina, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Virginia, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and Wake Forest University.

2010s

The decade would start with the Hokies continuing to qualify for the ACC and NCAA tournaments, and winning double digit games. 2010 marked the third straight year the Hokies achieved each of those milestones. However, after the season coach Kelly Cagle resigned to relocate her family to the Southwest. Charles Adair was hired as her replacement. Adair had been the associate head coach for the past 5 years at Virginia Tech. [7] Adair would pick up where Cagle left off. In his first season, the Hokies won 14 games, and finally broke through the first round of the NCAA tournament. The team would reach the Sweet 16 for the first time in program history. In 2012, the Hokies finished 4–5–1 in conference play for the third straight year. This record was good enough to qualify for the ACC Tournament in the previous two years, but was not good enough in 2012. However, the team did make another NCAA Tournament appearance. 2013 was arguably the best season in program history. The Hokies set a program record for wins, with 19, finished as runner up in the ACC Tournament and reached the Semifinals of the NCAA Tournament. Their 9 conference wins are a program record by 3 wins. The Hokies couldn't repeat the heights of 2013 in 2014. The team finished with 16 wins, and notched another NCAA Sweet 16 appearance, but their 5–5 ACC record was not good enough to qualify for the tournament. This was in part because the ACC reduced the tournament size to 4 teams instead of 8. 2015 saw the Hokies win total drop by 1, to 15. They lost in the second round of the NCAA Tournament and missed the ACC Tournament despite a 6–3–1 conference record. 2016 would end a run of 8 straight NCAA appearances. The Hokies did finish with a winning record of 11–5–3, but had a sub par 3–4–3 conference record. The Hokies endured a disappointing 2017 where they went 1–5–4 in conference play. 2018 proved to be a rebound, with the team qualifying for the ACC and NCAA tournaments after a two year hiatus. The Sweet 16 appearance in the NCAA tournament was their best result since 2014.

Charles "Chugger" Adair is a retired American soccer player and current soccer coach. He spent two seasons in the Continental Indoor Soccer League, two in the National Professional Soccer League and seven in the USISL A-League / USL First Division.

Seasons

SeasonHead coach [8] Season result [9] Tournament results
OverallConferenceConferenceNCAA
WinsLossesTiesWinsLossesTies
1993Sam Okpodu6101No Conference
19948110No Conference
1995†3123131
1996991530
1997991461
1998991560
19999100560
20009100No Conference
2001‡893181
2002 Jerry Cheynet 6111240
2003 Kelly Cagle 990240
2004^1190450First Round NCAA First Round
20056103172
2006684163
2007873352
20081094442Runners Up NCAA First Round
20091680640Second Round NCAA Round of 16
201010101451First Round NCAA First Round
2011 Charles Adair 1481451First Round NCAA Sweet 16
20121361451 NCAA First Round
20131953931Runner Up NCAA Semifinals
20141660550 NCAA Sweet 16
20151542631 NCAA Second Round
20161153343
2017765154
20181183550 First Round NCAA Sweet 16
20191252442 NCAA First Round

† In 1995 the Hokies began play in the Atlantic 10 Conference.
‡ In 2001 the Hokies began play in the Big East Conference.
^ In 2004 the Hokies began play in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

Personnel

2019 Roster

Source: [10]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

As the governing body of association football, FIFA is responsible for maintaining and implementing the rules that determine whether an association football player is eligible to represent a particular country in officially recognised international competitions and friendly matches. In the 20th century, FIFA allowed a player to represent any national team, as long as the player held citizenship of that country. In 2004, in reaction to the growing trend towards naturalisation of foreign players in some countries, FIFA implemented a significant new ruling that requires a player to demonstrate a "clear connection" to any country they wish to represent. FIFA has used its authority to overturn results of competitive international matches that feature ineligible players.

No.PositionPlayer
0 Flag of the United States.svg GK Dare Burnett
00 Flag of the United States.svg GK Alice Hamel
1 Flag of the United States.svg GK Mandy McGlynn
2 Flag of the United States.svg MF Holly Rose Weber
3 Flag of the United States.svg DF Jaylyn Thompson
4 Flag of the United States.svg MF Emily Gray
5 Flag of the United States.svg MF Cassidy Brown
6 Flag of the United States.svg DF Caroline Cipolla
7 Flag of the United States.svg MF Kiersten Hening
8 Flag of the United States.svg DF Kelsey Irwin
9 Flag of the United States.svg FW Emma Steigerwald
10 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg FW Nicole Kozlova
11 Flag of the United States.svg MF Grace Sklopan
12 Flag of the United States.svg FW Mikayla Mance
13 Flag of the United States.svg FW Karlie Johnson
No.PositionPlayer
14 Flag of the United States.svg MF Alexa Anderson
15 Flag of the United States.svg FW Allyson Brown
16 Flag of the United States.svg MF Jordan Hemmen
17 Flag of the United States.svg DF Olivia Odle
18 Flag of the United States.svg MF Kara Henderson
19 Flag of the United States.svg MF Lilly Weber
20 Flag of the United States.svg DF Caroline O'Connor
22 Flag of the United States.svg FW Bridget Patch
24 Flag of the United States.svg FW Emmalee McCarter
25 Flag of the United States.svg FW Calista Heister
26 Flag of the United States.svg FW Molly Feighan
27 Flag of the United States.svg DF Sydney Ash
28 Flag of the United States.svg MF Mak Graham
30 Flag of the United States.svg GK S.A. Phillips

Team Management

PositionStaff
Head Coach Charles Adair
Associate Head CoachDrew Kopp
Assistant CoachMatt Gwilliam
Director of OperationsMacaulay Soto

Source: [11]

Notable Alumni

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References

  1. "Virginia Tech University Trademarks" . Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  2. "Virginia Tech Women's Soccer Record Book" (PDF). hokiesports.com. Virginia Tech Athletics. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  3. "Thompson Field". hokiesports.com. Virginia Tech Athletics. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  4. TSLMail #131 – Friday, June 11, 2004
  5. Licker, Michael (October 17, 2002). "Tech's coach makes switch". dailyorange.com. The Daily Orange. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  6. "Virginia Tech first to jump into ACC". espn.com. ESPN. June 30, 2003. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  7. "Cagle resigns to relocate family". socceramerica.com. Soccer America. December 13, 2010. Retrieved May 22, 2019.
  8. 2018 Record Book , pp. 10
  9. 2018 Record Book , pp. 7–9
  10. "2019 Women's Soccer Roster". Virginia Tech Athletics. Retrieved November 18, 2019.
  11. "Women's Soccer Coaching Staff". hokiesports.com. Virginia Tech Athletics. Retrieved August 15, 2019.