Western European Summer Time

Last updated
Time in Europe:
Western European Time / Greenwich Mean Time (UTC)
Western European Time / Greenwich Mean Time (UTC)
Western European Summer Time / British Summer Time / Irish Standard Time (UTC+1)
Central European Time (UTC+1)
Central European Summer Time (UTC+2)
Eastern European Time / Kaliningrad Time (UTC+2)
Eastern European Time (UTC+2)
Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3)
Further-eastern European Time / Moscow Time / Turkey Time (UTC+3)
pale colours indicate where standard time is observed all year; dark colours indicate where a summer time is observed Time zones of Europe.svg
Time in Europe :
Western European Time / Greenwich Mean Time (UTC)
Western European Time / Greenwich Mean Time (UTC)
Western European Summer Time / British Summer Time / Irish Standard Time (UTC+1)
Central European Time (UTC+1)
Central European Summer Time (UTC+2)
Eastern European Time / Kaliningrad Time (UTC+2)
Eastern European Time (UTC+2)
Eastern European Summer Time (UTC+3)
Further-eastern European Time / Moscow Time / Turkey Time (UTC+3)
pale colours indicate where standard time is observed all year; dark colours indicate where a summer time is observed

Western European Summer Time (WEST, UTC+01:00) is a summer daylight saving time scheme, 1 hour ahead of Greenwich Mean Time and Coordinated Universal Time. It is used in:

Contents

The following countries also use the same time zone for their daylight savings time but use a different title:

The scheme runs from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October each year. At both the start and end of the schemes, clock changes take place at 01:00 UTC+00:00. During the winter, Western European Time (WET, GMT+0 or UTC±00:00) is used.

The start and end dates of the scheme are asymmetrical in terms of daylight hours: the vernal time of year with a similar amount of daylight to late October is mid-February, well before the start of summer time. The asymmetry reflects temperature more than the length of daylight.

Ireland observes Irish Standard Time during the summer months and changes to UTC±00:00 in winter. [1] As Ireland's winter time period begins on the last Sunday in October and finishes on the last Sunday in March, the result is the same as if it observed summer time.

Usage

The following countries and territories use UTC+01:00 during the summer, between 1:00 UTC on the last Sunday of March and 1:00 UTC on the last Sunday of October.

Ireland

In Ireland, since the Standard Time (Amendment) Act, 1971, Ireland has used UTC+1 in summer (officially "standard time", [9] Irish : am caighdeánach, [10] though usually called "summer time") and UTC+0 in winter (officially "winter time"). [11]

Portugal

Portugal moved to Central European Time and Central European Summer Time in 1992, but reverted to Western European Time in 1996 after concluding that energy savings were small, it had a disturbing effect on children's sleeping habits as it would not get dark until 22:00 or 22:30 in summer evenings, during winter mornings the sun was still rising at 9:00, with repercussions on standards of learning and school performance, and insurance companies reported a rise in the number of accidents. [12]

United Kingdom

Starting in 1916, the dates for the beginning and end of BST each year were mandated by the Parliament of the United Kingdom. From 1940 to 1945, the country used British Summer Time in the winter months and British Double Summer Time, a further hour ahead of GMT, in the summer months. From 1968 to 1971, the country used BST throughout the year. In February 2002, the Summer Time Order 2002 [13] changed the dates and times to match European rules for moving to and from daylight saving time.

Start and end dates of British Summer Time and Irish Standard Time

SummerBegins (BST)Ends (GMT)UK NotesIreland Notes
2017Sun 26 March 01:00Sun 29 October 01:00
2016Sun 27 March 01:00Sun 30 October 01:00
2015Sun 29 March 01:00Sun 25 October 01:00
2014Sun 30 March 01:00Sun 26 October 01:00
2013Sun 31 March 01:00Sun 27 October 01:00
2012Sun 25 March 01:00Sun 28 October 01:00
2011Sun 27 March 01:00Sun 30 October 01:00
2010Sun 28 March 01:00Sun 31 October 01:00
2009Sun 29 March 01:00Sun 25 October 01:00
2008Sun 30 March 01:00Sun 26 October 01:00
2007Sun 25 March 01:00Sun 28 October 01:00
2006Sun 26 March 01:00Sun 29 October 01:00
2005Sun 27 March 01:00Sun 30 October 01:00
2004Sun 28 March 01:00Sun 31 October 01:00
2003Sun 30 March 01:00Sun 26 October 01:00
2002Sun 31 March 01:00Sun 27 October 01:00UK adopts EU practice [13] [14] Ireland adopts EU Practice [14] [15]
2001Sun 25 March 01:00Sun 28 October 01:00
2000Sun 26 March 01:00Sun 29 October 01:00
1999Sun 28 March 01:00Sun 31 October 01:00
1998Sun 29 March 01:00Sun 25 October 01:00
1997Sun 30 March 01:00Sun 26 October 01:00
1996Sun 31 March 01:00Sun 27 October 01:00
1995Sun 26 March 01:00Sun 22 October 01:00
1994Sun 27 March 01:00Sun 23 October 01:00
1993Sun 28 March 01:00Sun 24 October 01:00
1992Sun 29 March 01:00Sun 25 October 01:00
1991Sun 31 March 01:00Sun 27 October 01:00
1990Sun 25 March 01:00Sun 28 October 01:00
1989Sun 26 March 01:00Sun 29 October 01:00
1988Sun 27 March 01:00Sun 23 October 01:00
1987Sun 29 March 01:00Sun 25 October 01:00
1986Sun 30 March 01:00Sun 26 October 01:00
1985Sun 31 March 01:00Sun 27 October 01:00
1984Sun 25 March 01:00Sun 28 October 01:00
1983Sun 27 March 01:00Sun 23 October 01:00
1982Sun 28 March 01:00Sun 24 October 01:00
1981Sun 29 March 01:00Sun 25 October 01:00
1980Sun 16 March 02:00Sun 26 October 02:00
1979Sun 18 March 02:00Sun 28 October 02:00
1978Sun 19 March 02:00Sun 29 October 02:00
1977Sun 20 March 02:00Sun 23 October 02:00
1976Sun 21 March 02:00Sun 24 October 02:00
1975Sun 16 March 02:00Sun 26 October 02:00
1974Sun 17 March 02:00Sun 27 October 02:00
1973Sun 18 March 02:00Sun 28 October 02:00
1972Sun 19 March 02:00Sun 29 October 02:00
1971Sun 31 October 02:00BST all year endsIST all year ends
1970BST all yearIST all year
1969BST all yearIST all year
1968Sun 18 February 01:00BST all year beginsIST all year begins
1967Sun 19 March 02:00Sun 29 October 02:00
1966Sun 20 March 02:00Sun 23 October 02:00
1965Sun 21 March 02:00Sun 24 October 02:00
1964Sun 22 March 02:00Sun 25 October 02:00
1963Sun 31 March 02:00Sun 27 October 02:00
1962Sun 25 March 02:00Sun 28 October 02:00
1961Sun 26 March 02:00Sun 29 October 02:00
1960Sun 10 April 02:00Sun 2 October 02:00
1959Sun 12 April 02:00Sun 4 October 02:00
1958Sun 20 April 02:00Sun 5 October 02:00
1957Sun 14 April 02:00Sun 6 October 02:00
1956Sun 22 April 02:00Sun 7 October 02:00
1955Sun 17 April 02:00Sun 2 October 02:00
1954Sun 11 April 02:00Sun 3 October 02:00
1953Sun 19 April 02:00Sun 4 October 02:00
1952Sun 20 April 02:00Sun 26 October 02:00
1951Sun 15 April 02:00Sun 21 October 02:00
1950Sun 16 April 02:00Sun 29 October 02:00
1949Sun 3 April 02:00Sun 30 October 02:00
1948Sun 14 March 02:00Sun 31 October 02:00
1947Sun 2 November 02:00Back to GMTBack to GMT
1947Sun 13 April 02:00Sun 10 August 02:00BDST (2 hours ahead)IST / no DST
1947Sun 16 March 02:00BST beginsIST begins
1946Sun 14 April 02:00Sun 6 October 02:00Back to GMT (Oct)Back to GMT (Oct)
1945Sun 7 October 02:00Back to GMTIST
1945Mon 2 April 01:00Sun 15 July 01:00BDST (2 hours ahead)IST / no DST
1944Sun 2 April 01:00Sun 17 September 01:00BDST (2 hours ahead)IST / no DST
1943Sun 4 April 01:00Sun 15 August 01:00BDST (2 hours ahead)IST / no DST
1942Sun 5 April 01:00Sun 9 August 01:00BDST (2 hours ahead)IST / no DST
1941Sun 4 May 01:00Sun 10 August 01:00BDST (2 hours ahead)IST / no DST
1940Sun 25 February 02:00BST 1940–1945 IST 1940–1946
1939Sun 16 April 02:00Sun 19 November 02:00
1938Sun 10 April 02:00Sun 2 October 02:00
1937Sun 18 April 02:00Sun 3 October 02:00
1936Sun 19 April 02:00Sun 4 October 02:00
1935Sun 14 April 02:00Sun 6 October 02:00
1934Sun 22 April 02:00Sun 7 October 02:00
1933Sun 9 April 02:00Sun 8 October 02:00
1932Sun 17 April 02:00Sun 2 October 02:00
1930Sun 13 April 02:00Sun 5 October 02:00
1929Sun 21 April 02:00Sun 6 October 02:00
1928Sun 22 April 02:00Sun 7 October 02:00
1927Sun 10 April 02:00Sun 2 October 02:00
1926Sun 18 April 02:00Sun 3 October 02:00
1925Sun 19 April 02:00Sun 4 October 02:00
1924Sun 13 April 02:00Sun 21 September 02:00
1923Sun 22 April 02:00Sun 16 September 02:00
1922Sun 26 March 02:00Sun 8 October 02:00
1921Sun 3 April 02:00Sun 2 October 02:00
1920Sun 28 March 02:00Sun 24 October 02:00
1919Sun 30 March 02:00Sun 28 September 02:00
1918Sun 24 March 02:00Sun 29 September 02:00
1917Sun 8 April 02:00Sun 16 September 02:00
1916Sun 21 May 02:00Sun 1 October 02:00Abolition of DMT

Note: Until 1 October 1916 time in all of Ireland was based on Dublin Mean Time, GMT − 25 minutes.

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Central European Time standard time (UTC+01:00)

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Western European Time time zone

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Summer time in Europe variation of standard clock time that is applied in most European countries in the period between spring and autumn

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British Summer Time Identifier for a time offset from UTC of +1

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Time in Australia country with three main time zones

Australia uses three main time zones: Australian Western Standard Time, Australian Central Standard Time, and Australian Eastern Standard Time. Time is regulated by the individual state governments, some of which observe daylight saving time (DST). Australia's external territories observe different time zones.

Time in the United Kingdom

The United Kingdom uses Greenwich Mean Time or Western European Time (UTC) and British Summer Time or Western European Summer Time (UTC+01:00).

Time in Chile is divided into three time zones. Most of Continental Chile uses the time offset UTC−04:00 in winter time and UTC−03:00 in summer time, while the Magallanes and Chilean Antarctica region uses the time offset UTC-03:00 the whole year. Additionally, Easter Island uses the time offset UTC−06:00 in winter time and UTC−05:00 in summer time

Uzbekistan time is the standard time in Uzbekistan; it is 5 hours ahead of UTC, UTC+05:00. The standard time uses no daylight saving time, though there has been constant debate whether to adopt it in order to increase leisure time.

Time in France

Metropolitan France uses Central European Time and Central European Summer Time. Daylight saving time is observed in Metropolitan France from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October. With its overseas territories, France uses 12 different time zones, more than any other country in the world.

Time in the Republic of Ireland

Ireland uses Irish Standard Time in the summer months and Greenwich Mean Time in the winter period.

Daylight saving time in Africa

The only African countries and regions that use daylight saving time are:

Time in Portugal overview about the time zones in Portugal

Portugal has two time zones and observes daylight saving time. Continental Portugal and Madeira use UTC+00:00, while the Azores use UTC–01:00. Daylight saving time is observed nationwide from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October, so that every year, continental Portugal and Madeira temporarily use UTC+01:00, and the Azores temporarily use UTC+00:00.

Time in Spain

Spain has two time zones and observes daylight saving time. Spain mainly uses Central European Time (GMT+01:00) and Central European Summer Time (GMT+02:00) in Peninsular Spain, the Balearic Islands, Ceuta, Melilla and plazas de soberanía. In the Canary Islands, the time zone is Western European Time (GMT±00:00) and Western European Summer Time (GMT+01:00). Daylight saving time is observed from the last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October throughout Spain.

Time in Denmark

Denmark, including the dependencies Faroe Islands and Greenland, uses six different time zones.

Winter time (clock lag) practice of turning back clocks so that mornings have more daylight and evenings have less

Winter time is the practice of shifting the clock back during winter months, usually −1 hour. It is a form of daylight saving time which is the opposite compensation to the summer time. However, while summer time is widely applied, use of winter time has been and is very rare.

References

  1. 1 2 "STANDARD TIME ACT, 1968".
  2. "AN tACHT UM AM CAIGHDEÁNACH, 1968".
  3. "timeanddate.com webpage erroneously referring to IST as "Irish Summer Time"" . Retrieved 27 August 2009.
  4. "Example of Trinity College, Dublin using the term "Irish Summer Time"". Trinity College, Dublin . Retrieved 27 August 2009.
  5. "Hora Legal em Portugal Continental [Standard and Summer Time in Continental Portugal]" (PDF) (in Portuguese). Astronomical Observatory of Lisbon . Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  6. "Time Changes in Lisbon over the years (1925–1949); Time Zone in Lisbon, Portugal". timeanddate.com. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  7. Law, Gwillim (30 May 2001). "Time Zones of Portugal". Statoids. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  8. "Decreto Regional n.º 5/82/M, de 3 de Abril [Regional Decree 5/82/M, 3 April 1982]" (PDF). Diário da República, I Série, n.º 78, 7 de Abril de 1982 (in Portuguese). 7 April 1982. pp. 777–778. Retrieved 20 May 2014.
  9. "Standard Time Act, 1968". Irish Statute Book . Attorney General. 15 July 1968.
  10. "Standard time". Focal . Retrieved 17 August 2012.
  11. "Standard Time (Amendment) Act, 1971". Irish Statute Book. Attorney General. 20 July 1971.
  12. "Lighter Evenings (Experiment) Bill [HL]".
  13. 1 2 "Statutory Instrument 2002 No. 262—The Summer Time Order 2002".
  14. 1 2 "Directive 2000/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 19 January 2001 on summer-time arrangements".
  15. "Winter Time Order, 2001".

Further reading