Willie Jones (baseball)

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Willie Jones
Puddin Head Jones.jpg
Jones' 1950 baseball card from Bowman Gum
Third baseman
Born:(1925-08-16)August 16, 1925
Dillon, South Carolina
Died: October 18, 1983(1983-10-18) (aged 58)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 10, 1947, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
May 7, 1961, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average .258
Home runs 190
Runs batted in 812
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Willie Edward Jones (August 16, 1925 – October 18, 1983), nicknamed "Puddin' Head", was a Major League Baseball third baseman who played for the Philadelphia Phillies (1947–1959), Cleveland Indians (1959) and Cincinnati Reds (1959–1961). He batted and threw right-handed.

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In a 15-season career, Jones was a .258 hitter with 190 home runs and 812 RBI in 1691 games played. Defensively, he recorded a .963 fielding percentage.

Born in Dillon, South Carolina, Jones grew up in and listed Laurel Hill, North Carolina, as his home. A World War II veteran of the United States Navy, Jones started his major league career with the Phillies in 1947. By 1949, he became the team's starting third baseman, and held that position until 1959. Jones was the top fielding third baseman in the National League during the 1950s. He led the league in fielding percentage five times, in putouts for seven years (also tying a record), and twice in assists and double plays. He was married and divorced to Carolyn, by whom he had three children, Eddie, Kathie, and Bradley.

Jones' most productive season came as a member of the fabulous 1950 "Whiz Kids" National League champion team, when he posted career-highs in home runs (25), RBI (88), runs (100), hits (163), and led the league in games played (157). In 1951 he hit 22 homers with 81 RBI and a career-high .285 batting average. He was selected for the All-Star Game in both seasons.

In 1959, Jones was part of successive trades between the Phillies, Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds. He finished his career with Cincinnati in 1961.

Jones died of cancer in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he had lived after his playing days were over, at the age of 58. [1]

Highlights

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