Women's football in Brunei

Last updated
Flag of Brunei.svg  Brunei
Association National Football Association of Brunei Darussalam
Confederation AFC (Asia)
Sub-confederation AFF (Southeast Asia)
FIFA code BRU

Under the current Sharia law, women's football in Brunei Darussalam is prohibited. [1] Until women were banned from playing, football was the second most popular sport in the country for women. [2] There are no registered female players in the country. [2] While there is officially no support for women's football in the country, only foreign girls at Berakas International School are allowed to play within the school campus. [3] There are also some women futsal teams set up as regional representatives on occasion. [4]

Team

The country's kit colours are gold shirts, black shorts, and gold socks. [5]

As of 2019, the women's national team has not competed at the Women's World Cup. [6] In 2005, the country was one of seven teams that included Thailand, Indonesia, East Timor, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Myanmar and Singapore, that were expected to field a women's football team to compete at the Southeast Asian Games in Marikina in December. [7] As of 2006, there was no official senior a team or junior national team. [2] In March 2012, the team was not ranked in the world by FIFA. [8]

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References

  1. "Khutbah - BERSUKAN". www.kheu.gov.bn. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  2. 1 2 3 FIFA (2006). "Women's Football Today" (PDF): 37. Retrieved 5 June 2012.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. "Goal! Football: Brunei" (PDF). FIFA. 20 January 2009. p. 4. Retrieved 5 June 2012.
  4. "Haji Puspa appointed head coach of SCB women's futsal team". Borneo Bulletin. 11 September 2018. Retrieved 5 April 2019.
  5. Pickering, David (1994). The Cassell soccer companion : history, facts, anecdotes. London: Cassell. p. 49. ISBN   0304342319. OCLC   59851970.
  6. Ballard, John; Suff, Paul (1999). The dictionary of football : the complete A-Z of international football from Ajax to Zinedine Zidane. London: Boxtree. pp. 101–102. ISBN   0-7522-2434-4. OCLC   59442612.
  7. Tandoc Jr., Edson C. (13 April 2005). "Tourism boost for Marikina". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved 11 June 2012.
  8. "The FIFA Women's World Ranking". FIFA.com. 25 September 2009. Retrieved 13 April 2012.