Zygoballus tibialis

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Zygoballus tibialis
Kaldari Zygoballus tibialis male 04.jpg
Male
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Salticidae
Genus: Zygoballus
Species:Z. tibialis
Binomial name
Zygoballus tibialis
F. O. P.-Cambridge, 1901 [1]

Zygoballus tibialis is a species of jumping spider native to Central America. It was first described by the arachnologist Frederick Octavius Pickard-Cambridge in 1901. [1] [2] The type specimens are housed at the Natural History Museum in London. [3]

Jumping spider family of arachnids

Jumping spiders are a group of spiders that constitute the family Salticidae. As at 1 February 2019, this family contained 636 described genera and 6115 described species, making it the largest family of spiders at 13% of all species. Jumping spiders have some of the best vision among arthropods and use it in courtship, hunting, and navigation. Although they normally move unobtrusively and fairly slowly, most species are capable of very agile jumps, notably when hunting, but sometimes in response to sudden threats or crossing long gaps. Both their book lungs and tracheal system are well-developed, and they use both systems. Jumping spiders are generally recognized by their eye pattern. All jumping spiders have four pairs of eyes, with the anterior median pair being particularly large.

Central America Place

Central America is located on the southern tip of North America, or is sometimes defined as a subcontinent of the Americas, bordered by Mexico to the north, Colombia to the southeast, the Caribbean Sea to the east, and the Pacific Ocean to the west and south. Central America consists of seven countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. The combined population of Central America has been estimated to be 41,739,000 and 42,688,190.

Frederick Octavius Pickard-Cambridge British arachnologist

Frederick Octavius Pickard-Cambridge was an English arachnologist. He is sometimes confused with his uncle, Octavius Pickard-Cambridge (1828–1917), who was also an arachnologist and from whom F. O. Pickard-Cambridge picked up his enthusiasm for the study of spiders.

The species has been collected from Mexico (Chiapas), [4] Guatemala, [2] Costa Rica, [5] and possibly Panama. [6]

Mexico country in the southern portion of North America

Mexico, officially the United Mexican States, is a country in the southern portion of North America. It is bordered to the north by the United States; to the south and west by the Pacific Ocean; to the southeast by Guatemala, Belize, and the Caribbean Sea; and to the east by the Gulf of Mexico. Covering almost 2,000,000 square kilometres (770,000 sq mi), the nation is the fifth largest country in the Americas by total area and the 13th largest independent state in the world. With an estimated population of over 120 million people, the country is the eleventh most populous state and the most populous Spanish-speaking state in the world, while being the second most populous nation in Latin America after Brazil. Mexico is a federation comprising 31 states and Mexico City, a special federal entity that is also the capital city and its most populous city. Other metropolises in the state include Guadalajara, Monterrey, Puebla, Toluca, Tijuana and León.

Chiapas State of Mexico

Chiapas, officially the Free and Sovereign State of Chiapas, is one of the 31 states that along with the federal district of Mexico City make up the 32 federal entities of Mexico. It is divided into 124 municipalities as of September 2017 and its capital city is Tuxtla Gutiérrez. Other important population centers in Chiapas include Ocosingo, Tapachula, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Comitán and Arriaga. It is the southernmost state in Mexico. It is located in Southeastern Mexico, and it borders the states of Oaxaca to the west, Veracruz to the northwest and Tabasco to the north, and by the Petén, Quiché, Huehuetenango and San Marcos departments of Guatemala to the east and southeast. Chiapas has a coastline along the Pacific Ocean to the south.

Guatemala republic in Central America

Guatemala, officially the Republic of Guatemala, is a country in Central America bordered by Mexico to the north and west, Belize and the Caribbean to the northeast, Honduras to the east, El Salvador to the southeast and the Pacific Ocean to the south. With an estimated population of around 16.6 million, it is the most populated country in Central America. Guatemala is a representative democracy; its capital and largest city is Nueva Guatemala de la Asunción, also known as Guatemala City.

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Zygoballus maculatus, sp. n.
Type, female, in coll. Godman and Salvin. Total length 3 millim.
Hab. Guatemala (Sarg).
This species is black, with a few white dorsal and marginal spots on the abdomen, and the legs i. brown, and ii., iii., and iv. yellow, annulated with black. It is probably recognizable by the form of the vulva only, for the coloration in these spiders is very variable, the general pattern being common to many of them.

References

  1. 1 2 "Taxon details Zygoballus tibialis F. O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1901". World Spider Catalog. Natural History Museum Bern. Retrieved 2016-07-23.
  2. 1 2 Pickard-Cambridge, Frederick Octavius (1901). Arachnida - Volume II: Araneidea and Opiliones. In Biologia Centrali-Americana . London: Dulau & Co. p. 292.
  3. Prószyński, Jerzy (April 28, 2013). "Zygoballus tibialis Pickard-Cambridge F., 1901". Global Species Database of Salticidae (Araneae). Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Retrieved 2014-09-27.
  4. Ibarra-Núñez, Guillermo; Maya-Morales, Julieta; Chamé-Vázquez, David (2011). "Spiders of the cloud montane forest of the Biosphere Reserve Volcán Tacaná, Chiapas, Mexico". Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad. 82: 1183–1193.
  5. Banks, Nathan (1909). "Arachnida from Costa Rica". Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 61 (2): 224.
  6. Chickering, Arthur M. (September 1946). "The Salticidae (Spiders) of Panama". Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology. 97: 404.