1840 in architecture

Last updated
List of years in architecture (table)

The year 1840 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

Contents

Events

Palace of Westminster meeting place of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, located in London, England

The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its occupants, the Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster, in central London, England.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of both England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

Charles Barry English architect

Sir Charles BarryFRS RA was an English architect, best known for his role in the rebuilding of the Palace of Westminster in London during the mid-19th century, but also responsible for numerous other buildings and gardens. He is known for his major contribution to the use of Italianate architecture in Britain, especially the use of the Palazzo as basis for the design of country houses, city mansions and public buildings. He also developed the Italian Renaissance garden style for the many gardens he designed around country houses.

I. K. Brunel's train shed at Bristol Temple Meads; engraving by John Cooke Bourne Bristol Temple Meads railway station train-shed engraving.jpg
I. K. Brunel's train shed at Bristol Temple Meads; engraving by John Cooke Bourne

Buildings opened

Wingfield railway station

Wingfield railway station was built by the North Midland Railway on its line between Derby and Leeds which is now part of the Midland Main Line. From Ambergate the line passes Wingfield with a station which closed in 1967 although the buildings, by Francis Thompson, remain, in a derelict condition.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Francis Thompson (1808–1895) was an English architect particularly well known for his railway work.

Awards

Births

January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 354 days remaining until the end of the year.

Robert Fellowes Chisholm was a British architect who pioneered the Indo-Saracenic style of architecture in Madras.

The year 1915 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

Deaths

February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 316 days remaining until the end of the year.

Jeffry Wyatville English architect and garden designer

Sir Jeffry Wyatville was an English architect and garden designer. Born Jeffry Wyatt into an established dynasty of architects, in 1824 he was allowed by King George IV to change his surname to Wyatville. He is mainly remembered for making alterations and extensions to Chatsworth House and Windsor Castle.

1766 in architecture Overview of the events of 1766 in architecture

The year 1766 in architecture involved some significant events.

Related Research Articles

Philip Hardwick English architect

Philip Hardwick was an English architect, particularly associated with railway stations and warehouses in London and elsewhere. Hardwick is probably best known for London's demolished Euston Arch and its twin station, the original Birmingham Curzon Street, which stands today as the oldest railway terminus building in the world.

This is a timeline of architecture, indexing the individual year in architecture pages. Notable events in architecture and related disciplines including structural engineering, landscape architecture, and city planning. One significant architectural achievement is listed for each year.

The year 1976 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 1902 in architecture involved some significant events.

The year 1859 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 1856 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 1908 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 1835 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 1852 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 1853 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 1837 in architecture involved some significant events.

The year 1855 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

The year 1847 in architecture involved some significant architectural events and new buildings.

Edward Blore British artist

Edward Blore was a 19th-century British landscape and architectural artist, architect and antiquary.

Events from the year 1840 in the United Kingdom.

Architecture of Scotland

The architecture of Scotland includes all human building within the modern borders of Scotland, from the Neolithic era to the present day. The earliest surviving houses go back around 9500 years, and the first villages 6000 years: Skara Brae on the Mainland of Orkney being the earliest preserved example in Europe. Crannogs, roundhouses, each built on an artificial island, date from the Bronze Age and stone buildings called Atlantic roundhouses and larger earthwork hill forts from the Iron Age. The arrival of the Romans from about 71 AD led to the creation of forts like that at Trimontium, and a continuous fortification between the Firth of Forth and the Firth of Clyde known as the Antonine Wall, built in the second century AD. Beyond Roman influence, there is evidence of wheelhouses and underground souterrains. After the departure of the Romans there were a series of nucleated hill forts, often utilising major geographical features, as at Dunadd and Dunbarton.

Events from the year 1840 in Scotland.

References

  1. Riding, Christine (2005-02-07). "Westminster: A New Palace for a New Age". BBC . Retrieved 2010-11-15.
  2. Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN   0-14-102715-0.
  3. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 263–264. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  4. Biddle, Gordon (2003). Britain's Historic Railway Buildings: an Oxford Gazetteer of Structures and Sites. Oxford University Press. ISBN   0-19-866247-5.
  5. "Forglen House, Ref 13603". Historic Scotland. Archived from the original on 2013-12-31. Retrieved 2014-02-26.