2014 UEFA European Under-17 Championship

Last updated
2014 UEFA European Under-17 Championship
2014 UEFA European Under-17 Championship.png
The official logo of the tournament
Tournament details
Host countryMalta
Dates9–21 May
Teams53 (qualification)
8 (finals)
Venue(s)3 (in 3 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of England.svg  England (2nd title)
Runners-upFlag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Tournament statistics
Matches played15
Goals scored46 (3.07 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of England.svg Dominic Solanke
Flag of the Netherlands.svg Jari Schuurman
(4 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of the Netherlands.svg Steven Bergwijn [1]
2013
2015

The 2014 UEFA European Under-17 Championship was the 13th edition of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship, an annual football competition between men's under-17 national teams organised by UEFA. The final tournament was hosted for the first time in Malta, from 9 to 21 May 2014, after their bid was selected by the UEFA Executive Committee on 20 March 2012 in Istanbul, Turkey. [2]

Contents

Fifty-three teams participated in a two-round qualification stage, taking place between September 2013 and March 2014, to determine the seven teams joining the hosts. Players born after 1 January 1997 were eligible to participate in this competition. [3] This edition marked the first appearance of a national team from Gibraltar, [4] and was the first UEFA competition allowing referees to use a vanishing spray when setting free kicks. [5] Live broadcast was provided by Eurosport 2 and Eurosport International. [6]

England beat the Netherlands in the final on penalties to secure their second European under-17 title, four years after their first, and the second to be won by coach John Peacock. The 2013 champions, Russia, failed to qualify for the final tournament.

Qualification

Qualification for the final tournament of the 2014 UEFA European Under-17 Championship consisted of two rounds: a qualifying round and an elite round. In the qualifying round, 53 national teams competed in 13 groups of four teams, with each group winner and runner-up, plus the best third-placed team, advancing to the elite round. There, the 27 first-round qualifiers plus Germany, who was given a bye, were distributed in seven groups of four teams. The winner of each group qualified for the final tournament.

Qualified teams

CountryQualified asPrevious appearances in tournament 1
Flag of Malta.svg  Malta Hosts0 (debut)
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland Group 1 winner 6 ( 2002 , 2005, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2013)
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey Group 2 winner 5 (2004, 2005 , 2008 , 2009, 2010)
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands Group 3 winner 7 (2002, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011 , 2012 )
Flag of England.svg  England Group 4 winner 8 (2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010 , 2011)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Group 5 winner 5 (2006, 2007, 2009 , 2011, 2012)
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Group 6 winner 1 (2008)
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal Group 7 winner 4 (2002, 2003 , 2004, 2010)
1 Only counted appearances for under-17 era (bold indicates champion for that year, while italic indicates hosts)

Final draw

The draw for the group stage of the final tournament was held on 9 April 2014 at Saint James Cavalier in Valletta. It was conducted by UEFA's Youth and Amateur Football Committee chairman Jim Boyce, along with Fr. Hilary Tagliaferro and former Maltese international David Carabott. The host team, Malta, was automatically assigned as team one in group A, while the remaining teams were drawn successively in the order B1, A2, B2, A3, B3, A4 and B4. [7] [8]

Venues

Malta location map.svg
Map of venues

Squads

Match officials

Group stage

Map of the 2014 UEFA European Under-17 Championship finalist teams and their performances. The inset shows Malta (host). 2014 UEFA European Under-17 Championship map.svg
Map of the 2014 UEFA European Under-17 Championship finalist teams and their performances. The inset shows Malta (host).

Fixtures and match schedule were confirmed by UEFA on 15 April 2014. [6]

Tie-breaking

If two or more teams were equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following tie-breaking criteria were applied: [3]

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the matches played between the teams in question;
  2. Superior goal difference resulting from the matches played between the teams in question;
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the matches played between the teams in question;

If, after having applied criteria 1 to 3, teams still have an equal ranking, criteria 1 to 3 are reapplied exclusively to the matches between the teams in question to determine their final rankings. If this procedure does not lead to a decision, criteria 4 to 7 apply.

  1. Superior goal difference in all group matches;
  2. Higher number of goals scored in all group matches;
  3. Respect Fair play ranking of the teams in question (final tournament);
  4. Drawing of lots.

If only two teams are tied (according to criteria 1–7) after having met in the last match of the group stage, their ranking is determined by a penalty shoot-out.

All times are in Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00).

Group A

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 3300104+69 Knockout stage
2Flag of England.svg  England 320173+46
3Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 31027703
4Flag of Malta.svg  Malta (H)3003212100
Source: [ citation needed ]
(H) Host
Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg3–2Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey
Verdonk Soccerball shade.svg 54' (pen.)
Nouri Soccerball shade.svg 69'
Ould-Chikh Soccerball shade.svg 75'
Report Ünal Soccerball shade.svg 43'
Aktay Soccerball shade.svg 79'
Malta  Flag of Malta.svg0–3Flag of England.svg  England
Report Roberts Soccerball shade.svg 15', 48'
Armstrong Soccerball shade.svg 25'
Ta' Qali National Stadium, Attard
Referee: Aleksandrs Anufrijevs (Latvia)

England  Flag of England.svg4–1Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey
Solanke Soccerball shade.svg 22', 49'
Kenny Soccerball shade.svg 58'
Armstrong Soccerball shade.svg 64'
Report Ünal Soccerball shade.svg 16'
Gozo Stadium, Xewkija
Attendance: 1,631
Referee: Jonathan Lardot (Belgium)
Malta  Flag of Malta.svg2–5Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Mbong Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Friggieri Soccerball shade.svg 64'
Report Schuurman Soccerball shade.svg 5', 27', 42'
Bergwijn Soccerball shade.svg 13', 69'

Turkey  Flag of Turkey.svg4–0Flag of Malta.svg  Malta
Alici Soccerball shade.svg 43', 58'
Aktay Soccerball shade.svg 70', 76'
Report
England  Flag of England.svg0–2Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands
Report Verdonk Soccerball shade.svg 45'
van der Moot Soccerball shade.svg 68'
Hibernians Ground, Paola
Referee: Alexander Harkam (Austria)

Group B

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 330040+49 Knockout stage
2Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 320143+16
3Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 30121321
4Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 30122531
Source: [ citation needed ]
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg1–1Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Henrichs Soccerball shade.svg 58' Report Babic Soccerball shade.svg 72'
Gozo Stadium, Xewkija
Referee: Alexander Harkam (Austria)
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg0–2Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
Report Sanches Soccerball shade.svg 18'
Mata Soccerball shade.svg 78'

Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg0–1Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal
Report Mata Soccerball shade.svg 54'
Germany  Flag of Germany.svg0–1Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Report Wright Soccerball shade.svg 41'
Hibernians Ground, Paola
Referee: Aleksandrs Anufrijevs (Latvia)

Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg1–3Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Oberlin Soccerball shade.svg 20' Report Wighton Soccerball shade.svg 45'
Sheppard Soccerball shade.svg 56'
Hardie Soccerball shade.svg 63'

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, penalty shoot-out is used to decide the winner if necessary (no extra time is played). [3]

Bracket

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
18 May – Attard
 
 
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 5
 
21 May – Attard
 
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 0
 
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1 (1)
 
18 May – Attard
 
Flag of England.svg  England (p)1 (4)
 
Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 0
 
 
Flag of England.svg  England 2
 

Semi-finals

Portugal  Flag of Portugal.svg0–2Flag of England.svg  England
Report Solanke Soccerball shade.svg 52'
Roberts Soccerball shade.svg 74'
Ta' Qali National Stadium, Attard
Referee: Alexander Harkam (Austria)

Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg5–0Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
Verdonk Soccerball shade.svg 35' (pen.)
Nouri Soccerball shade.svg 38'
Bergwijn Soccerball shade.svg 57'
Owobowale Soccerball shade.svg 59'
Van der Moot Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Report

Final

Team of the Tournament

[9]

Goalscorers

4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal

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References

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  2. "Malta, Bulgaria, Azerbaijan picked for U17s". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). 20 March 2012. Retrieved 9 April 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 "Regulations of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship 2013/14" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). Retrieved 1 April 2014.
  4. "Draw to launch U17 road to Malta". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). 20 November 2012. Retrieved 9 April 2014.
  5. "Vanishing spray leaves lasting impression". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). 16 May 2014. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  6. 1 2 "Under-17 match and TV schedule confirmed". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). 15 April 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2014.
  7. "Swiss, Germany, England complete U17 finals cast". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). 31 March 2014. Retrieved 9 April 2014.
  8. "Malta meet England, Germany face Switzerland". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). 9 April 2014. Retrieved 9 April 2014.
  9. "Technical report" (PDF). UEFA: 21. Archived from the original (PDF) on 14 September 2017.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)