2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship

Last updated

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.png
Tournament details
Host countryUnited States
Dates4–17 October 2018 [1]
Teams8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)3 (in 3 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of the United States.svg  United States (8th title)
Runners-upFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Third placeFlag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Fourth placeFlag of Panama.svg  Panama
Tournament statistics
Matches played16
Goals scored83 (5.19 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of the United States.svg Alex Morgan (7 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of the United States.svg Julie Ertz
Best young player Flag of Jamaica.svg Jody Brown
Best goalkeeper Flag of Panama.svg Yenith Bailey
Fair play awardFlag of the United States.svg  United States
2014
2022

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship was the 10th edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship (also known as the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup or the CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying Tournament), the quadrennial international football championship organised by CONCACAF for the women's national teams of the North, Central American and Caribbean region. Eight teams played in the tournament, which took place from 4–17 October in the United States. [2]

The CONCACAF Women's Championship, in some years called the CONCACAFWomen'sGoldCup or the CONCACAFWomen'sWorldCupqualifying, is a football competition organized by CONCACAF that often serves as the qualifying competition to the Women's World Cup. In years when the tournament has been held outside the World Cup qualifying cycle, non-CONCACAF members have been invited. CONCACAF is the governing body for football for North America, Central America and the Caribbean. The most successful country has been the United States, winning their eighth title in 2018.

Association football team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Contents

The tournament served as the CONCACAF qualifiers to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France. The top three teams qualified for the World Cup, while the fourth-placed team advanced to a play-off against the third-placed team from the South American confederation, CONMEBOL. [3] It also determined the CONCACAF teams playing at the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament in Lima. [4]

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process decided all 24 teams which will play in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the hosts France qualifying automatically. It will be the eighth FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament will be the third to be hosted in Europe, after the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden and the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany.

In the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process, one spot in the final tournament was allocated to the winner of a two-legged home-and-away play-off between the fourth-placed team from CONCACAF (Panama) and the third-placed team from CONMEBOL (Argentina).

CONMEBOL governing body of association football in South America

The South American Football Confederation is the continental governing body of football in South America and it is one of FIFA's six continental confederations. The oldest continental confederation in the world, its headquarters are located in Luque, Paraguay, near Asunción. CONMEBOL is responsible for the organization and governance of South American football's major international tournaments. With 10 member football associations, it has the fewest members of all the confederations in FIFA.

The United States were the defending champions of the competition. They successfully defended their title as hosts, winning the final 2–0 against Canada for their 8th CONCACAF Women's Championship title. [5]

United States womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States Women's National Soccer Team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning three Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic women's gold medals, eight CONCACAF Gold Cups, and ten Algarve Cups. It medaled in every single World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF.

Canada womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Canada

The Canada women's national soccer team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

Qualification

Regional qualification tournaments were held to determine the teams playing in the final tournament.

Qualified teams

The following eight teams qualified for the final tournament. Canada, Mexico, and the United States, as members of the North American Football Union (NAFU), qualified automatically. Two teams from the Central American Football Union (UNCAF) and three teams from the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) qualified from their regional qualifying competitions.

North American Football Union

The North American Football Union (NAFU) is a regional grouping under CONCACAF of national football organizations in the North American Zone. The NAFU has no organizational structure. The statutes say "CONCACAF shall recognize ... The North American Football Union (NAFU)". The NAFU provide one of CONCACAF's representatives to the FIFA Executive Committee.

Central American Football Union sports governing body

The Unión Centroamericana de Fútbol, more commonly known by the acronym UNCAF, represents the national football teams of Central America: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama. Its member associations are part of CONCACAF.

Caribbean Football Union The nominal governing body for association football in the Caribbean as well as Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana.

The Caribbean Football Union (CFU) is the nominal governing body for association football in the Caribbean as well as Bermuda, Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana. It represents 25 FIFA member nations, as well as 6 territories that are not affiliated to FIFA. The Union was established in January 1978 and its Member Associations compete in the CONCACAF region.

TeamQualificationAppearancePrevious best performancePrevious FIFA Women's World Cup appearances FIFA ranking
at start of event [6]
North American Zone (NAFU)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Automatic9thChampions (1998, 2010)65
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico Automatic9thRunners-up (1998, 2010)324
Flag of the United States.svg  United States (title holders & hosts)Automatic9thChampions (1991, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2014)71
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica Central American winners7thRunners-up (2014)134
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama Central American runners-up3rdGroup stage (2002, 2006)066
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica Caribbean winners6thFourth place (2006)064
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago Caribbean runners-up10thThird place (1991)052
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba Caribbean third place1stDebut088

Venues

The venues were announced by CONCACAF on 8 April 2018. Sahlen's Stadium and H-E-B Park hosted the group stage matches, while Toyota Stadium hosted the four matches in the knockout stage. [7]

WakeMed Soccer Park soccer stadium in Cary, North Carolina

WakeMed Soccer Park is a major soccer complex located in Cary, North Carolina, United States. Originally opened in 2002 as the home of the Carolina Courage of the WUSA, WakeMed Soccer Park is now the home to North Carolina FC of the United Soccer League and the North Carolina Courage of the National Women's Soccer League. The North Carolina State Wolfpack men's and women's teams of the ACC play select matches there and the complex regularly hosts major tournaments such as the NCAA College Cup, the ACC Soccer Championships, and the NCHSAA high school state soccer finals.

H-E-B Park

H-E-B Park is a soccer-specific stadium in Edinburg, Texas. It serves as the home of Rio Grande Valley FC Toros of the USL Championship, the second level of the US/Canadian professional soccer pyramid. Rio Grande Valley Football Club is affiliated with the Houston Dynamo, of Major League Soccer. The stadium has two stands with orange seats covered with a roof and a capacity of 9,735.

Toyota Stadium (Texas) soccer stadium in Texas

Toyota Stadium is a soccer-specific stadium with a 20,500-seat capacity, built and owned by the city of Frisco, Texas. Its primary tenants are Major League Soccer (MLS) team FC Dallas, which relocated from the Cotton Bowl in central Dallas, and Frisco Independent School District high school football games. It is also the future home of the National Soccer Hall of Fame with opening ceremony occurring in winter 2018.

Cary, North Carolina Edinburg, Texas Frisco, Texas
Sahlen's Stadium H-E-B Park Toyota Stadium
Capacity: 10,000Capacity: 9,735Capacity: 20,500
WakeMed Soccer Park 2013.jpg Pizza Hut Park.jpg

Draw

The draw for the final tournament was held on 4 September 2018, 10:00 EDT (UTC−4), at the Univision Studios in Miami. [8] [9] The eight teams were drawn into two groups of four teams. They were seeded into four pots. Pot 1 contained the United States, seeded in Group A, and Canada, seeded in Group B. The remaining six teams were allocated to Pots 2–4 based on the CONCACAF Women's Rankings. The two teams from UNCAF could not be drawn into the same group.

Eastern Time Zone time zone observing UTC−05:00 during standard time and UTC−04:00 during daylight saving time

The Eastern Time Zone (ET) is a time zone encompassing part or all of 22 states in the eastern part of the contiguous United States, parts of eastern Canada, the state of Quintana Roo in Mexico, Panama in Central America, and the Caribbean Islands.

UTC−04:00 Identifier for a time offset from UTC of −4

UTC−04:00 is a time offset that subtracts 4 hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). It is observed in the Eastern Time Zone during the warm months of daylight saving time, as Eastern Daylight Time. The Atlantic Time Zone observes it during standard time . It is observed all year in the Eastern Caribbean.

Miami City in Florida, United States

Miami, officially the City of Miami, is the cultural, economic and financial center of South Florida. Miami is the seat of Miami-Dade County, the most populous county in Florida. The city covers an area of about 56.6 square miles (147 km2), between the Everglades to the west and Biscayne Bay on the east; with a 2017 estimated population of 463,347, Miami is the sixth most densely populated major city in the United States. The Miami metropolitan area is home to 6.1 million people and the seventh-largest metropolitan area in the nation. Miami's metro area is the second-most populous metropolis in the southeastern United States and fourth-largest urban area in the U.S. Miami has the third tallest skyline in the United States with over 300 high-rises, 80 of which stand taller than 400 feet.

Pot 1Pot 2Pot 3Pot 4

Squads

The provisional 35-player roster (4 must be goalkeepers) for each team was announced by CONCACAF on 10 September 2018. [10] The final 20-player roster (2 must be goalkeepers) for each team was announced by CONCACAF on 26 September 2018. [11] After the final 20-player roster was submitted, only injury-related changes would be submitted until 24 hours before each team's first match. [12]

Group stage

The top two teams of each group advance to the semi-finals.

Tiebreakers

Teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss). The rankings of teams in each group are determined as follows (regulations Article 12.12): [12]

  1. points obtained in all group matches;
  2. goal difference in all group matches;
  3. number of goals scored in all group matches;

If two or more teams are equal on the basis of the above three criteria, their rankings are determined as followed:

  1. points obtained in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  2. goal difference in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  3. number of goals scored in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  4. fair play points in all group matches:
    • first yellow card: minus 1 point;
    • indirect red card (second yellow card): minus 3 points;
    • direct red card: minus 4 points;
    • yellow card and direct red card: minus 5 points;
  5. drawing of lots by CONCACAF.

Group A

All times are local, EDT (UTC−4). [13]

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States (H)3300180+189 Knockout stage
2Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 32015506
3Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 31024953
4Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 3003114130
Source: CONCACAF
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
(H) Host.
Trinidad and Tobago  Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg0–3Flag of Panama.svg  Panama
Report
Sahlen's Stadium, Cary
Referee: Odette Hamilton (Jamaica)
United States  Flag of the United States.svg6–0Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Report
Sahlen's Stadium, Cary
Attendance: 5,404
Referee: Carol Anne Chénard (Canada)

Panama  Flag of Panama.svg0–5Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
Sahlen's Stadium, Cary
Attendance: 7,532
Referee: Tatiana Guzmán (Nicaragua)
Mexico  Flag of Mexico.svg4–1Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago
Report
Sahlen's Stadium, Cary
Referee: Mirian León (El Salvador)

Panama  Flag of Panama.svg2–0Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Report
Trinidad and Tobago  Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg0–7Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
Sahlen's Stadium, Cary
Attendance: 3,996
Referee: Odette Hamilton (Jamaica)

Group B

All times are local, CDT (UTC−5). [13]

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualification
1Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3300171+169 Knockout stage
2Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 3201102+86
3Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 310294+53
4Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 3003029290
Source: CONCACAF
Rules for classification: Group stage tiebreakers
Costa Rica  Flag of Costa Rica.svg8–0Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba
Report
H-E-B Park, Edinburg
Referee: Ekaterina Koroleva (United States)
Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg2–0Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Report
H-E-B Park, Edinburg
Referee: Francia González (Mexico)

Jamaica  Flag of Jamaica.svg1–0Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica
Report
Cuba  Flag of Cuba.svg0–12Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Report
H-E-B Park, Edinburg
Referee: Crystal Sobers (Trinidad and Tobago)

Cuba  Flag of Cuba.svg0–9Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Report
H-E-B Park, Edinburg
Referee: Crystal Sobers (Trinidad and Tobago)
Costa Rica  Flag of Costa Rica.svg1–3Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Report
H-E-B Park, Edinburg
Referee: Lucila Venegas (Mexico)

Knockout stage

In the semi-finals, if the match was level at the end of 90 minutes, no extra time would be played and the match would be decided by a penalty shoot-out. In the third place match and final, if the match was level at the end of 90 minutes, extra time would be played, and if still tied after extra time, the match would be decided by a penalty shoot-out (Regulations Article 12.14). [12]

Bracket

All times are local, CDT (UTC−5). [13]

 
Semi-finals Final
 
      
 
14 October – Frisco
 
 
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 0
 
17 October – Frisco
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 7
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 0
 
14 October – Frisco
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 2
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 6
 
 
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 0
 
Third place play-off
 
 
17 October – Frisco
 
 
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 2 (2)
 
 
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica (p)2 (4)

Semi-finals

Panama  Flag of Panama.svg0–7Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Report
Toyota Stadium, Frisco
Referee: Odette Hamilton (Jamaica)

United States  Flag of the United States.svg6–0Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Report
Toyota Stadium, Frisco
Attendance: 7,555
Referee: Francia González (Mexico)

Canada and United States qualified for 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Panama and Jamaica entered into the third place play-off.

Third place play-off

Panama  Flag of Panama.svg2–2 (a.e.t.)Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica
Report
Penalties
2–4
Toyota Stadium, Frisco
Referee: Carol Anne Chénard (Canada)

Jamaica qualified for 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Panama entered CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off vs. Argentina.

Final

Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg0–2Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Report
Toyota Stadium, Frisco
Attendance: 6,986
Referee: Lucila Venegas (Mexico)

Awards

Winners

 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship Winners 
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Eighth title

Individual awards

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament. [14]

AwardPlayer
Golden Ball Flag of the United States.svg Julie Ertz
Golden Boot Flag of the United States.svg Alex Morgan (7 goals)
Golden Glove Flag of Panama.svg Yenith Bailey
Young Player Flag of Jamaica.svg Jody Brown
Fair PlayFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Best XI
GoalkeepersDefendersMidfieldersForwards
Flag of Panama.svg Yenith Bailey

Goalscorers

There were 83 goals scored in 16 matches, for an average of 5.19 goals per match.

7 goals

6 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

Qualification for international tournaments

Qualified teams for FIFA Women's World Cup

The following three teams from CONCACAF qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Panama failed to qualify losing out the play-off to 2018 Copa América Femenina third-placed team, Argentina.

TeamQualified onPrevious appearances in FIFA Women's World Cup 1
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 14 October 2018 [15] 6 (1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015 )
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 14 October 2018 [15] 7 ( 1991 , 1995, 1999 , 2003 , 2007, 2011, 2015 )
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 17 October 2018 [16] 0 (debut)
1Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

Qualified teams for Pan American Games

The tournament was used to determine the four teams from CONCACAF which qualified for the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament. The top team from each of the three zones qualified, with the fourth team to be determined by CONCACAF at a later date. [4]

TeamZoneQualified onPrevious appearances in Pan American Games 2
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica CFU 11 October 20181 (2007)
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama UNCAF 11 October 20181 (2007)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States NAFU 17 October 20182 ( 1999 , 2007)
TBDTBDTBD
2Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

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