3rd Field Artillery Regiment (United States)

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3rd Field Artillery Regiment
3FARegtCOA.png
Coat of arms
Active1812
Country Flag of the United States.svg
BranchFlag of the United States Army.svg  United States Army
Type USA - Army Field Artillery Insignia.svg Field artillery
Role USARS parent regiment
Size regiment
Motto(s)"Celeritas et Accuratio" (Speed and Accuracy)
Branch colorScarlet
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia 3 FA Rgt DUI.png
U.S. Field Artillery Regiments
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The 3rd Field Artillery Regiment is a field artillery regiment of the United States Army, first formed in 1812, although regimental units trace their lineages as far back as 1794. Based on the service of these antecedents, the regiment claims battle honors for the War of 1812, the Seminole campaign, the Mexican War, the Civil War, the Spanish–American War, and the Philippine Insurrection. The regiment served with the 6th Division during World War I, with the 5th Division, 6th Division and 2d Cavalry Division between the world wars, and with the 9th Armored Division during and after World War II. Since 1961, the regiment has been a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System and the U.S. Army Regimental System, with regimental elements serving with the 1st, 6th, and 8th Infantry Divisions; 2nd and 3rd Armored Divisions; 1st Cavalry Division; 194th Armored Brigade; and various field artillery brigades and groups. Two regimental battalions are currently active: the 2nd Battalion in the 1st Armored Division and the 5th Battalion in the 17th Field Artillery Brigade

Contents

History

Although the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment was only constituted in 1907, its constituent elements trace their history to various numbered companies of artillery dating back to 1794. Under a myriad of designations, these separate batteries fought in Canada during the War of 1812, against the Seminoles during the Indian Wars, in numerous campaigns during the Mexican War and Civil War, and in both Cuba and Puerto Rico during the Spanish–American War. [1]

The regiment's antecedents fought in the War of 1812, the Battle of Sharpsburg, the Battle of Gettysburg, the battle of Cold Harbor, the battle of the Wilderness, and the Battle of Petersburg.

The 3rd Field Artillery was assigned 17 November 1917 to the 6th Division, and fought in World War I. It was relieved 24 March 1923 from assignment to the 6th Division and assigned to the 5th Division; relieved 1 January 1930 from assignment to the 5th Division and assigned to the 6th Division.

The 3rd Field Artillery was relieved 25 September 1939 from assignment to the 6th Division and assigned to the 2d Cavalry Division. The personnel of the 3rd Field Artillery would serve in an armored field artillery battalion as part of the 9th Armored Division.

The 9th Armored Division landed in Normandy late in September 1944, and first went into the line, 23 October 1944, on patrol duty in a quiet sector along the Luxembourg-German frontier. When the Germans launched their winter offensive on 16 December 1944, the 9th, with no real combat experience, suddenly found itself engaged in heavy fighting. The Division saw its severest action at St. Vith, Echternach, and Bastogne, its units fighting in widely separated areas. Its stand at Bastogne held off the Germans long enough to enable the 101st Airborne Division to dig in for a defense of the city. After a rest period in January 1945, the Division prepared to drive across the Roer River. The offensive was launched on 28 February 1945 and the 9th crossed the Roer to Rheinbach, sending patrols into Remagen. On 7 March 1945, elements of the 9th Armored found that the Ludendorff Bridge was still standing. When German demolition charges failed to bring the bridge down, they crossed it, disarming and removing the remaining charges, which could have exploded at any time. The Division exploited the bridgehead, moving south and east across the Lahn River toward Limburg, where thousands of Allied prisoners were liberated from Stalag XIIA. The Division drove on to Frankfurt and then turned to assist in the closing of the Ruhr Pocket. In April it continued east, encircling Leipzig and securing a line along the Mulde River. The Division was shifting south to Czechoslovakia when the war in Europe ended on 9 May 1945. [2] All units of CCB/9 AIB of the 9th Armored Division were awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for their actions in taking and defending the Ludendorff Bridge during the Battle of Remagen in World War II.

The regiment then fought in Operation Desert Storm, Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation Inherent Resolve.

Further Service by Regimental Elements

Elements of Battery C, 4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment's Reconnaissance Team drive past a burning Iraqi tank. Vehicles from 4-3 FA follow closely behind during the Battle of Norfolk during the 1st Gulf War, February 1991. C Battery, 4-3 FA Advance Party Team.jpg
Elements of Battery C, 4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment's Reconnaissance Team drive past a burning Iraqi tank. Vehicles from 4-3 FA follow closely behind during the Battle of Norfolk during the 1st Gulf War, February 1991.
Battery C, 4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Division(FWD) moves into position to conduct fire missions during the Battle of Norfolk, February 1991. 4-3FADA1991.jpg
Battery C, 4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Division(FWD) moves into position to conduct fire missions during the Battle of Norfolk, February 1991.
4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment conducts artillery strikes on Iraqi positions during the 1st Gulf War. 4-3 FA was the primary fire support battalion for Task Force 1-41 during the 1st Gulf War, February 1991. DS1991.jpg
4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment conducts artillery strikes on Iraqi positions during the 1st Gulf War. 4-3 FA was the primary fire support battalion for Task Force 1-41 during the 1st Gulf War, February 1991.
A M109A2 self-propelled howitzer, belonging to 4-3 FA Battalion, prepares to move into position to engage Iraqi forces, February 1991. 4-3 FA Battalion conducted numerous fire missions and artillery raids during the 1st Gulf War. DSM109A2.jpg
A M109A2 self-propelled howitzer, belonging to 4-3 FA Battalion, prepares to move into position to engage Iraqi forces, February 1991. 4-3 FA Battalion conducted numerous fire missions and artillery raids during the 1st Gulf War.
A M109A2 howitzer belonging to Battery C, 4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Division(FWD) during the Gulf War, February 1991. M1094-3FA1991.jpg
A M109A2 howitzer belonging to Battery C, 4th Battalion of the 3rd Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Division(FWD) during the Gulf War, February 1991.

Heraldry

Distinctive unit insignia

3 FA Rgt DUI.png

The distinctive unit insignia is an adaptation of the shield and crest of the coat of arms. The insignia is 1 1/4 inches (3.18 cm) in height.

The shield is scarlet for Artillery. The Civil War is represented by the chevron and four stars, one for each battery in that war. The lion's face, dragon and fleur-de-lis allude to the War of 1812. China Relief Expedition and World War I, respectively. The rising sun indicates the regiment dates back nearly to the dawn of this country's history (Battery "D" was organized in 1802), and the Aztec banner is for the Mexican War.

The distinctive unit insignia was approved on 11 August 1922. It was redesignated for the 3d Field Artillery Battalion on 25 March 1941. It was redesignated for the 3d Armored Field Artillery Battalion on 7 December 1943. The insignia was cancelled on 19 October 1959. The insignia was restored and authorized for the 3d Field Artillery Regiment effective 1 September 1971.

Coat of arms

3FARegtCOA.png

Lineage & Honors

Lineage

(2d Battalion inactivated 1 August 1922 at Camp George G. Meade, Maryland.)
(2d Battalion activated 22 September 1922 at Fort Sheridan, Illinois; inactivated 14 December 1922 at Fort Sheridan, Illinois.)
(2d Battalion consolidated 7 September 1927 with the 1st Battalion, 14th Field artillery [active] [see Annex], and consolidated unit designated as the 2d Battalion, 3d Field artillery.)
(1st Battalion inactivated 3 December 1934 at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana.)
(1st Battalion activated 1 October 1939 at Fort Riley, Kansas; 2d Battalion inactivated 1 June 1940 at Fort Sheridan, Illinois)

Current Status of Regimental Elements

Campaign Participation Credit

Decorations

See also

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References

Citations

  1. 1 2 3 4 McKenney, Janice E. (2010). "3d Field Artillery". Field Artillery Part 1. (CMH Pub 60-11-1(Part 1)). Army Lineage Series. United States Army Center of Military History: Washington. 278. Web. Accessed 19 October 2015 <http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-11_pt1/CMH_Pub_60-11_pt1.pdf>.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. "9th Armored Division". U.S. ARMY CENTER OF MILITARY HISTORY. Retrieved 23 December 2015.
  3. 1 2 McKenney, Janice E. (2010). "1st Battalion, 3d Field Artillery". Field Artillery Part 1. (CMH Pub 60-11-1(Part 1)). Army Lineage Series. United States Army Center of Military History: Washington. 278. Web. Accessed 19 October 2015 <http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-11_pt1/CMH_Pub_60-11_pt1.pdf>.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  4. "Hell on Wheels" by Steven Smith
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  6. "History of the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Field Artillery Regiment "Gunners"." n.d. Web. Accessed 12 December 2017.<https://www.bliss.army.mil/1BCT1ARM/2-3.html Archived 2017-12-13 at the Wayback Machine >.
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  8. 1 2 McKenney, Janice E. (2010). "3d Battalion, 3d Field Artillery". Field Artillery Part 1. (CMH Pub 60-11-1(Part 1)). Army Lineage Series. United States Army Center of Military History: Washington. 283. Web. Accessed 19 October 2015 <http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-11_pt1/CMH_Pub_60-11_pt1.pdf>.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  9. 1 2 McKenney, Janice E. (2010). "1st Battalion, 3d Field Artillery". Field Artillery Part 1. (CMH Pub 60-11-1(Part 1)). Army Lineage Series. United States Army Center of Military History: Washington. 285. Web. Accessed 19 October 2015 <http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-11_pt1/CMH_Pub_60-11_pt1.pdf>.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  10. Hillman 1993, p. 4.
  11. Dinackus P.4–10
  12. The Road to Safwan: The 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry in the 1991 Persian Gulf War by Bourque P.96
  13. The Road to Safwan: The 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry in the 1991 Persian Gulf War by Bourque P.98
  14. The Road to Safwan: The 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry in the 1991 Persian Gulf War by Bourque P.99
  15. The Road to Safwan: The 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry in the 1991 Persian Gulf War by Bourque P. 99
  16. Bourque P.159
  17. Jayhawk! The 7th Corps in the Persian Gulf War by Bourque P.164
  18. Bourque, p.164
  19. 1 2 Bourque P.161
  20. 1 2 https://armyhistory.org/the-gulf-war-and-european-artillery/
  21. Hillman 1993, p. 24.
  22. http://www.wearethemighty.com/articles/6-massive-tank-battles-from-us-history
  23. Bourque P.332
  24. Zaloga (2009), p. 64
  25. 1 2 3 4 Bourque P.375
  26. Lingamfelter p.190-191
  27. 1 2 Rostker Tab H
  28. Bourque, p.336
  29. FM 6-50 Chapter 2
  30. Fontenot P.294
  31. Bourque P.319
  32. Bourque P.337
  33. Lingamfelter P.190-191
  34. VUA citation
  35. https://history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-11_pt1/CMH_Pub_60-11_pt1.pdf
  36. McKenney, Janice E. (2010). "6th Battalion, 3d Field Artillery". Field Artillery Part 1. (CMH Pub 60-11-1(Part 1)). Army Lineage Series. United States Army Center of Military History: Washington. 291. Web. Accessed 19 October 2015 <http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-11_pt1/CMH_Pub_60-11_pt1.pdf>.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  37. McKenney, Janice E. (2010). "8th Battalion, 3d Field Artillery". Field Artillery Part 1. (CMH Pub 60-11-1(Part 1)). Army Lineage Series. United States Army Center of Military History: Washington. 293. Web. Accessed 19 October 2015 <http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-11_pt1/CMH_Pub_60-11_pt1.pdf>.PD-icon.svgThis article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.

Works consulted

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Army Institute of Heraldry document: "3rd Field Artillery Regiment".