Adventures in Two Worlds

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Adventures in Two Worlds
AdventuresinTwoWorlds.jpg
First UK edition
Author A. J. Cronin
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Genre Autobiography
Publisher Gollancz (UK)
Little, Brown (US)
Publication date
1952
Media typePrint (Hardback & Paperback)
Pages288 pp (UK hardback edition)
ISBN 0-450-03195-0 (UK hardback edition)

Adventures in Two Worlds is the 1952 autobiography of Dr. A. J. Cronin, in which he relates, with much humour, the exciting events of his dual career as a medical doctor and a novelist.

From the flyleaf of 'Beyond This Place' (Angus and Robertson Sydney - London):

Adventures in Two Worlds: Dr Cronin's published novels make up an imposing list of successes. This book, his first non-fiction work, which relates moving and dramatic episodes from his dual career as doctor and novelist will certainly be as widely ready and applauded as his preceding publications.

Dr Cronin has recorded not only the achievements of his early life but also the struggles and setbacks that gave him such a sympathetic understanding of the sufferings of others.

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