And a Bang on the Ear

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"And a Bang on the Ear"
The Waterboys And a Bang on the Ear 1989 Single Cover.jpg
Single by the Waterboys
from the album Fisherman's Blues
B-side "The Raggle Taggle Gypsy"
ReleasedJune 1989 [1]
Length7:29
Label Ensign, Chrysalis
Songwriter(s) Mike Scott
Producer(s) John Dunford, Mike Scott
The Waterboys singles chronology
"Fisherman's Blues"
(1988)
"And a Bang on the Ear"
(1989)
"How Long Will I Love You?"
(1990)

"And a Bang on the Ear" is a song from Scottish-Irish folk rock band the Waterboys, released as the second single from their fourth studio album Fisherman's Blues . It was written by Mike Scott, and produced by John Dunford and Scott. The song reached No. 1 in the Republic of Ireland and No. 51 in the United Kingdom.

Contents

Background

The song was recorded at Spiddal House in Spiddal, Connemara, County Galway, Ireland, in April 1988. [2] In 2006, fiddle player Steve Wickham recalled of the song, "We played a lot of takes before we got this right. It is often the simple ones that are the most difficult." [3] The single's B-side, "The Raggle Taggle Gypsy", was recorded live at Barrowlands Ballroom in Glasgow. [4]

Critical reception

On its release as a single, Music & Media wrote, "Easy-going, traditional folk material with a strong melody line and good lyrics. Stylewise, an uncompromising song but one that could be a hit." [5] Tim Nicholson of Record Mirror noted, "Song title of the week, and a jig so authentic that it's almost immune from criticism." [6]

In a review of Fisherman's Blues, Stereo Review described the song as "lilting, rollicking, and altogether effortless". The reviewer added, "It flows in a way that suggests Scott has arrived at some breakthrough in his conception of the Waterboys." [7] Audio picked the song as the album's "best cut" and described it as "a bouncy ditty full of cyanide and vinegar". [8] Ira Robbins, writing in The Trouser Press Record Guide , considered the song to be "rollicking" and one of the album's tracks to "make the most of Scott's adopted heritage". [9] Ian Abrahams of Record Collector felt the song had a "wistful romance". [10]

Track listings

7-inch and cassette single
No.TitleLength
1."And a Bang on the Ear"6:45
2."The Raggle Taggle Gypsy"4:36
12-inch and CD single
No.TitleLength
1."And a Bang on the Ear"7:29
2."The Raggle Taggle Gypsy"4:36
CD single (US release)
No.TitleLength
1."And a Bang on the Ear (Edit)"6:45
2."And a Bang on the Ear"7:25
3."The Raggle Taggle Gypsy"4:35

Personnel

The Waterboys

Production

Charts

Chart (1989)Peak
position
Ireland (IRMA) [11] 1
UK Singles (OCC) [12] 51

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References

  1. "The Waterboys". Mikescottwaterboys.com. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  2. "The Waterboys". Mikescottwaterboys.com. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  3. "The Waterboys". Mikescottwaterboys.com. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  4. "The Waterboys – And A Bang On The Ear / The Raggle Taggle Gypsy – Ensign – UK – ENY 624". 45cat. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  5. "Previews: Singles". Music & Media Magazine. 15 July 1989.
  6. Nicholson, Tim (24 June 1989). "45". Record Mirror . p. 31.
  7. "Stereo Review – Google Books". 26 May 2010. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  8. "Audio – Google Books". 19 September 2011. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  9. Robbins, Ira A. (4 January 2007). The Trouser Press Record Guide – Ira A. Robbins – Google Books. ISBN   9780020363613 . Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  10. "Fisherman's Box – Record Collector Magazine". Recordcollectormag.com. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  11. "The Irish Charts – Search Results – And a Bang on the Ear". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved 30 May 2021.
  12. "Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 30 May 2021.