Athletics at the 1996 Summer Olympics – Men's triple jump

Last updated
Men's triple jump
at the Games of the XXVI Olympiad
Athletics pictogram.svg
Pictogram for athletics
Venue Centennial Olympic Stadium
Date26 July 1996 (qualifications)
27 July 1996 (finals)
Competitors43 from 32 nations
Winning distance18.09 OR
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Kenny Harrison
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Jonathan Edwards
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
Bronze medal icon.svg Yoelbi Quesada
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba
  1992
2000  

The final of the men's triple jump event at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia was held on July 27, 1996. There were 43 participating athletes from 32 nations, with two qualifying groups. The maximum number of athletes per nation had been set at 3 since the 1930 Olympic Congress. The top twelve and ties, and all those reaching 17.00 metres advanced to the final. The qualification round was held on July 26, 1996. [1] The event was won by Kenny Harrison of the United States, the nation's second consecutive and sixth overall victory in the men's triple jump. Jonathan Edwards's silver was Great Britain's first medal in the event since 1984; Yoelbi Quesada's bronze was Cuba's first men's triple jump medal ever.

Contents

Summary

Coming into the competition, Jonathan Edwards was the only man to have jumped 18 metres, from his remarkable back to back world records at the world championships a year earlier and backing it up with another 18 metre jump in London a few weeks later. At age 30, he was the youngest of the major contenders; defending champion Mike Conley was already 33, and former world champion Kenny Harrison was 31 and coming back from a serious knee injury. Edwards did not look that good in qualifying, unable to make the automatic qualifying mark in two attempts, while Harrison, Conley, Yoelbi Quesada, Brian Wellman and Galin Georgiev did.

In the final, on his first attempt Edwards looked a lot better, his first attempt landing well past the 18 metre mark and approaching his world record. Exiting the pit, he saw the red flag. A few jumpers later, Harrison became the second best jumper in history with a 17.99, adding more than a foot to the Olympic record. On his second attempt, Edwards put another jump deep into the pit and again saw the red flag. Now Edwards was faced with the prospect of getting nothing if he could not land his next jump in the top eight. His next time down the runway was much more careful and controlled, making a far less secure 17.13, which at the moment put him in third place, but was well within the ability of most of the jumpers who followed him in the order. Again following Edwards, Harrison jumped 18.09 m (59 ft 4 in) to become the second man over 18 metres. More impressive, it was into a -0.4 mp/s wind, which remains the longest jump ever into a negative wind. Edwards survived in third behind Quesada. On his next jump he was able to let loose and hit 17.88, an outstanding jump for anybody else in any other competition, but that left him 21 cm behind in second place. In the same round Quesada improved to 17.44 and Conley to 17.40. On his fifth attempt, Edwards soared to within inches of the world record marker, but got another red flag. Having earned the last jump, Harrison passed to rest for one final attempt, if needed. On his final attempt Edwards boomed another one close to the world record, but the red flag ended his evening with Harrison taking the gold. Neither Quesada or Conley improved their position in their last jumps, also fouling both attempts, so Quesada held on to bronze.

Background

This was the 23rd appearance of the event, which is one of 12 athletics events to have been held at every Summer Olympics. The returning finalists from the 1992 Games were gold medalist Mike Conley Sr. of the United States, bronze medalist Frank Rutherford of the Bahamas, fifth-place finisher Brian Wellman of Bermuda, sixth-place finisher Yoelbi Quesada of Cuba, eighth-place finisher Zou Sixin of China, ninth-place finisher Vasiliy Sokov of the Unified Team (now representing Russia), and tenth-place finisher Māris Bružiks of Latvia (who did not start in Atlanta). Jonathan Edwards of Great Britain was the world champion and world record holder, the only man yet to jump over 18 metres. Americans Conley and Kenny Harrison and Cubans Quesada and Aliecer Urrutia joined Edwards in the top tier of contenders. [2]

Armenia, Azerbaijan, Dominica, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Lithuania, Russia, Tunisia, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan each made their first appearance in the event. The United States competed for the 22nd time, having missed only the boycotted 1980 Games.

Competition format

The competition used the two-round format introduced in 1936. In the qualifying round, each jumper received three attempts to reach the qualifying distance of 17.00 metres; if fewer than 12 men did so, the top 12 (including all those tied) would advance. In the final round, each athlete had three jumps; the top eight received an additional three jumps, with the best of the six to count. [2] [3]

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

World recordFlag of the United Kingdom.svg  Jonathan Edwards  (GBR)18.29 Gothenburg, Sweden 7 August 1995
Olympic recordFlag of the United States.svg  Mike Conley Sr.  (USA)17.63 Barcelona, Spain 3 August 1992

Kenny Harrison jumped 17.99 metres in the first round of the final, breaking the Olympic record. He extended his new record further with his fourth jump, reaching 18.09 metres. Jonathan Edwards also beat the old Olympic record, though his 17.88 metres came after Harrison's first effort.

Schedule

All times are Eastern Daylight Time (UTC-4)

DateTimeRound
Friday, 26 July 199618:10Qualifying
Saturday, 27 July 199619:00Final

Results

Qualifying

RankAthleteNation123DistanceNotes
1 Kenny Harrison Flag of the United States.svg  United States 17.5817.58Q
2 Mike Conley Sr. Flag of the United States.svg  United States 17.2017.20Q
3 Yoelbi Quesada Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 17.1917.19Q
4 Brian Wellman Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda 17.1017.10Q
5 Galin Georgiev Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 17.0217.02Q
6 Jonathan Edwards Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 16.9316.9616.96q
7 Robert Howard Flag of the United States.svg  United States 16.8316.7616.9216.92q
8 Volodymyr Kravchenko Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 16.7116.90X16.90q
9 Viktor Sotnikov Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 16.86X16.1916.86q
10 Jérôme Romain Flag of Dominica.svg  Dominica 16.80XX16.80q
11 Armen Martirosyan Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia 15.7116.6816.7416.74q
12 Frank Rutherford Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas X16.3816.7316.73q
13 Francis Agyepong Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 16.7116.68X16.71
14 Charles Friedek Flag of Germany.svg  Germany X16.7116.5816.71
15 Aliecer Urrutia Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 16.7116.54X16.71
16 Vasiliy Sokov Flag of Russia.svg  Russia X16.68X16.68
17 Rogel Nachum Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 15.8616.6716.5316.67
18 Anísio Silva Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 16.3816.6716.0816.67
19 Carlos Calado Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 16.4316.65X16.65
20 Yoel García Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 15.94X16.6216.62
21 Zou Sixin Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 16.1316.4416.5316.53
22 Messias José Baptista Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 16.0216.4516.1316.45
23 Audrius Raizgys Flag of Lithuania (1988-2004).svg  Lithuania 16.38X16.0616.38
24 Zsolt Czingler Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 16.2216.35X16.35
25 Salem Al-Ahmadi Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg  Saudi Arabia X15.9716.3016.30
26 Francis Dodoo Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana XX16.2416.24
27 Vasif Asadov Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan XX16.2116.21
28 Jacob Katonon Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 16.0816.17X16.17
29 Stoyko Tsonov Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 16.0016.15X16.15
30 Sigurd Njerve Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 15.22X16.1516.15
31 Aleksey Fatyanov Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 16.14X16.1316.14
32 Igor Sautkin Flag of Russia.svg  Russia XX16.0616.06
33 Tibor Ordina Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 16.04XX16.04
34 Andrew Murphy Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 15.97X16.0016.00
35 Festus Igbinoghene Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 15.95X15.7215.95
36 Sergey Arzamasov Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 15.91X15.91
37 Maksim Smetanin Flag of Kyrgyzstan.svg  Kyrgyzstan 15.8315.90X15.90
38 Yevgeniy Petin Flag of Uzbekistan.svg  Uzbekistan X15.5815.8915.89
39 Paul Nioze Flag of the Seychelles (1977-1996).svg  Seychelles 15.6315.43X15.63
40 Kawan Lovelace Flag of Belize.svg  Belize 15.40X14.9715.40
41 Hussain Jasim Flag of Iraq (1991-2004).svg  Iraq 15.1915.27X15.27
42 Ndabazinhle Mdhlongwa Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 14.47XX14.47
43 Karim Sassi Pre-1999 Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia XX14.2514.25
Māris Bružiks Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia DNS

Final

RankAthleteNation123456DistanceNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Kenny Harrison Flag of the United States.svg  United States 17.99 OR X18.09 OR X18.09 OR
Silver medal icon.svg Jonathan Edwards Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain XX17.1317.88XX17.88
Bronze medal icon.svg Yoelbi Quesada Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 17.0417.29X17.44XX17.44
4 Mike Conley Sr. Flag of the United States.svg  United States 17.08X16.1717.40XX17.40
5 Armen Martirosyan Flag of Armenia.svg  Armenia 16.85X16.9716.48X16.3416.97
6 Brian Wellman Flag of Bermuda (1910-1999).svg  Bermuda 16.95X16.82XXX16.95
7 Galin Georgiev Flag of Bulgaria.svg  Bulgaria 16.85XXXX16.9216.92
8 Robert Howard Flag of the United States.svg  United States 16.7216.8316.90X16.4416.5216.90
9 Viktor Sotnikov Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 16.8416.5316.56Did not advance16.84
10 Volodymyr Kravchenko Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 16.3515.9216.62Did not advance16.62
11 Frank Rutherford Flag of the Bahamas.svg  Bahamas 16.38X16.36Did not advance16.38
Jérôme Romain Flag of Dominica.svg  Dominica XDid not advanceNo mark

See also

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games: Men's Triple Jump". sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 25 December 2017.
  2. 1 2 "Triple Jump, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 10 September 2020.
  3. Official Report, vol. 3, p. 91.