Austria women's national football team

Last updated
Austria
Austria mixed COA.svg
Association ÖFB
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Dominik Thalhammer
Captain Viktoria Schnaderbeck
Most caps Nina Burger (98)
Top scorer Nina Burger (42)
FIFA code AUT
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First colours
Kit left arm oost16a.png
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current21 Increase2.svg 1 (28 September 2018) [1]
Highest20 (September 2017)
Lowest48 (July 2003)
First international
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 9–0 Austria  Flag of Austria.svg
(Bari, Italy, 6 July 1970)
Biggest win
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 11–0 Armenia  Flag of Armenia.svg
(Waidhofen, Austria, 10 May 2003)
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 11–0 Armenia  Flag of Armenia.svg
(Waidhofen, Austria, 13 May 2003)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 9–0 Austria  Flag of Austria.svg
(Bari, Italy, 6 July 1970)
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 9–0 Austria  Flag of Austria.svg
(8 November 1970)
European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2017 )
Best resultSemifinals (2017)

The Austria women's national football team represents Austria in international women's football.

Austria Federal republic in Central Europe

Austria, officially the Republic of Austria, is a country in Central Europe comprising 9 federated states. Its capital, largest city and one of nine states is Vienna. Austria has an area of 83,879 km2 (32,386 sq mi), a population of nearly 9 million people and a nominal GDP of $477 billion. It is bordered by the Czech Republic and Germany to the north, Hungary and Slovakia to the east, Slovenia and Italy to the south, and Switzerland and Liechtenstein to the west. The terrain is highly mountainous, lying within the Alps; only 32% of the country is below 500 m (1,640 ft), and its highest point is 3,798 m (12,461 ft). The majority of the population speaks local Bavarian dialects as their native language, and German in its standard form is the country's official language. Other regional languages are Hungarian, Burgenland Croatian, and Slovene.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, also commonly known as women's football or women's soccer is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

Contents

The team is made up mainly of players from the Austrian and German Women's Bundesligas. In 2016 the team qualified for its first-ever major tournament: UEFA Women's Euro 2017.

UEFA Womens Euro 2017 2017 edition of the UEFA Womens Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams.

History

Beginnings

The Austrian team started playing on July 6, 1970 against Mexico in Bari, Italy, competing in the Women's World Cup 1970, [2] unofficial competition held in that country from July 6 to July 15, 1970. The result was a 9–0 crushing defeat, which remains one of its worst results in its history, with this result Austria was quickly out of the competition, playing after months against Switzerland, repeating itself again the defeat against Mexico, 9–0.

Mexico womens national football team womens national association football team representing Mexico

The Mexico women's national football team is governed by La Federación Mexicana de Fútbol.

Bari Comune in Apulia, Italy

Bari is the capital city of the Metropolitan City of Bari and of the Apulia region, on the Adriatic Sea, in southern Italy. It is the second most important economic centre of mainland Southern Italy after Naples and Palermo, a port and university city, as well as the city of Saint Nicholas. The city itself has a population of 326,799, as of 2015, over 116 square kilometres (45 sq mi), while the urban area has 700,000 inhabitants. The metropolitan area has 1.3 million inhabitants.

Italy republic in Southern Europe

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a country in Southern and Western Europe. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy shares open land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia and the enclaved microstates San Marino and Vatican City. Italy covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. With around 61 million inhabitants, it is the fourth-most populous EU member state and the most populous country in Southern Europe.

It played two recognized friendlies against Switzerland before the first Women's World Cup in 1978 and 1990, losing both by 6–2 and 5–1. The Austrian team did not participate in the inaugural Women's World Cup 1991 in China and also the 1995 edition in Sweden, but during that time played international friendlies. Austria played Women's Euro 1997 Qualifiers, held in Norway and Sweden. It was placed in Class B, in Group 7 with Switzerland, Yugoslavia and Greece, winning three games in a single chance against their three opponents, tying a game against Greece and losing two against Switzerland and Yugoslavia, finishing third in the group and eliminated from both tournaments. Thus, Austria did not enter the 1999 World Cup Qualifiers, held in the United States. Austria ended 1999 with three games of qualifying for the Euro 2001.

The Switzerland women's national football team represents Switzerland in international women's football. The team played its first match in 1972.

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

2000's and 2010's

The team started 2000 with a 3–0 defeat against Belgium, four days later they lost again, with Poland by 3–2 but won 1–0 against Wales, finishing third and returning to be eliminated from a tournament. The Austrians played their first game of the 2003 World Cup Qualification against Scotland losing 2–1 with goal from Stallinger in the 21st minute, then played against Wales and won 2–0 with another goal from Stallinger and one from Schalkhammer-Hufnagl. Their third match against Belgium was a 3–1 defeat, with a goal by Spieler in the 59th minute. Austria lost their second match against Belgium 4–2, with goals from Szankovich and Fuhrmann, after a month, the team played against Scotland, with a crushing defeat for 5–0 and finally a 1–1 draw with Wales with Austria's only goal coming from Spieler in the 45th minute, ending with 4 points from one win, one tie and four losses, and thus eliminated. The latest and best performing competition of Austria was the qualification for the Women's World Cup in 2011, where they started out poorly but reached third place with 10 points, the product of three wins, one draw and four defeats. They played the 2015 Women's World Cup Qualification, but failed to qualify.

The Belgium women's national football team represents Belgium in international women's football. It is controlled by the Royal Belgian Football Association, the governing body for football in Belgium. Their home stadium is Den Dreef and their current coach Ives Serneels. During most of its history the team has had poor results, but showed improvement in the Euro 2013 and 2015 World Cup Qualifiers. In 2016 they qualified for their first major tournament: Euro 2017.

Poland womens national football team womens national association football team representing Poland

The Poland women's national football team represents Poland in international women's football. The team, controlled by the Polish Football Association, has never qualified for a major international tournament.

The Wales women's national football team represents Wales in international women's football. They have yet to qualify for the final stages of the World Cup or European Championships and are currently ranked 35th in the world and 20th in Europe. The team is run by the Welsh FA.

Record at Tournaments

World Cup

World Cup Finals
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did Not Enter
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995
Flag of the United States.svg 1999
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Did Not Qualify
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007
Flag of Germany.svg 2011
Flag of Canada.svg 2015
Flag of France.svg 2019
Total0/8-------
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

UEFA Women's Euro

UEFA Women's Euro record
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
1984 Did Not Enter
Flag of Norway.svg 1987
Flag of Germany.svg 1989
Flag of Denmark.svg 1991
Flag of Italy.svg 1993
Flag of Germany.svg 1995
Flag of Norway.svg Flag of Sweden.svg 1997 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Germany.svg 2001
Flag of England.svg 2005
Flag of Finland.svg 2009
Flag of Sweden.svg 2013
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2017 Semi-Finals523051+4
Total1/12523051+4
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Invitational trophies

Recent schedule and results

2018

Team

Current squad

Players called for the 2018 Cyprus Women's Cup. [4]

Head coach: Dominik Thalhammer
Caps and goals as of 7 March 2018

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Manuela Zinsberger (1995-10-19) 19 October 1995 (age 23)430 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich
22 DF Marina Georgieva (1997-04-13) 13 April 1997 (age 21)30 Flag of Germany.svg SC Sand
32 DF Katharina Naschenweng (1997-12-16) 16 December 1997 (age 20)110 Flag of Austria.svg Sturm Graz
44 FW Viktoria Pinther (1998-10-16) 16 October 1998 (age 20)160 Flag of Germany.svg SC Sand
54 FW Sophie Maierhofer (1996-08-09) 9 August 1996 (age 22)211 Flag of Iceland.svg UMF Selfoss
62 DF Katharina Schiechtl (1993-02-27) 27 February 1993 (age 25)364 Flag of Germany.svg Werder Bremen
72 DF Carina Wenninger (1991-02-06) 6 February 1991 (age 27)783 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich
83 MF Nadine Prohaska (1990-08-15) 15 August 1990 (age 28)827 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten
94 FW Sarah Zadrazil (1993-02-19) 19 February 1993 (age 25)577 Flag of Germany.svg Turbine Potsdam
104 FW Nina Burger (1987-12-27) 27 December 1987 (age 30)10052 Flag of Germany.svg Sand
112 DF Viktoria Schnaderbeck (c) (1991-01-04) 4 January 1991 (age 27)632 Flag of England.svg Arsenal
124 FW Stefanie Enzinger (1989-11-20) 20 November 1989 (age 29)141 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten
132 DF Virginia Kirchberger (1993-05-25) 25 May 1993 (age 25)581 Flag of Germany.svg SC Freiburg
143 MF Barbara Dunst (1997-09-25) 25 September 1997 (age 21)180 Flag of Germany.svg Duisburg
154 FW Nicole Billa (1996-03-05) 5 March 1996 (age 22)4113 Flag of Germany.svg Hoffenheim
162 DF Jasmin Eder (1992-10-08) 8 October 1992 (age 26)391 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten
173 MF Sarah Puntigam (1992-10-13) 13 October 1992 (age 26)8211 Flag of France.svg Montpellier HSC
183 MF Laura Feiersinger (1993-04-05) 5 April 1993 (age 25)6010 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FFC Frankfurt
192 DF Verena Aschauer (1994-01-20) 20 January 1994 (age 24)526 Flag of Germany.svg Sand
204 FW Julia Hickelsberger (1999-08-01) 1 August 1999 (age 19)00 Flag of Austria.svg Neulengbach
211 GK Jasmin Pfeiler (1984-07-28) 28 July 1984 (age 34)210 Flag of Austria.svg Altenmarkt
223 MF Jennifer Klein (1999-01-11) 11 January 1999 (age 19)40 Flag of Austria.svg St. Polten
231 GK Jasmin Pal (1996-08-24) 24 August 1996 (age 22)00 Flag of Austria.svg Wacker Innsbruck
244 FW Annelie Leitner (1996-06-15) 15 June 1996 (age 22)00 Flag of the United States.svg Indiana Hoosiers
3 MF Laura Wienroither (1999-01-13) 13 January 1999 (age 19)10 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the Austrian squad since June 2017. [5] [6] [7]

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
MF Katharina Aufhauser (1997-01-06) 6 January 1997 (age 21)00 Flag of Spain.svg Sporting de Huelva v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, 28 November 2017
MF Adina Hamidovic (1998-04-26) 26 April 1998 (age 20)00 Flag of Germany.svg Sand v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, 28 November 2017
FW Simona Koren (1993-03-28) 28 March 1993 (age 25)90 Flag of England.svg Sunderland v. Flag of Spain.svg  Spain, 28 November 2017
MF Sandrine Sobotka (1998-10-08) 8 October 1998 (age 20)00 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten v. Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands, 19 October 2017
GK Carolin Grössinger (1997-05-10) 10 May 1997 (age 21)00 Flag of Austria.svg Bergheim v. Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia, 19 September 2017
FW Lisa Makas (1992-05-11) 11 May 1992 (age 26)5218 Flag of Germany.svg Duisburg UEFA Women's Euro 2017

INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
RET Retired from international football
SUS Suspended in official matches.

Statistics

Last updated: 7 March 2018

  Still active national team players are highlighted

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References

  1. "The FIFA Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 28 September 2018. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  2. Womens World Cup 1970
  3. Cyprus Cup
  4. "Squad" (in German). ÖFB. Retrieved 2 March 2018.
  5. "Austria Squad". UEFA. Retrieved 7 April 2016.
  6. "Squad" (in German). ÖFB. Retrieved 7 April 2016.
  7. "Squad" (in German). ÖFB. Retrieved 18 November 2017.