Austria women's national football team

Last updated
Austria
Austria mixed COA.svg
Association Österreichischer Fußball-Bund (ÖFB)
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Irene Fuhrmann
Captain Viktoria Schnaderbeck
Most caps Sarah Puntigam (109)
Top scorer Nina Burger (53) [1]
FIFA code AUT
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Kit shorts sides on white.png
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First colours
Kit left arm oost16a.png
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 21 Steady2.svg (20 August 2021) [2]
Highest20 (September 2017)
Lowest48 (July 2003)
First international
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 9–0 Austria  Flag of Austria.svg
(Bari, Italy, 6 July 1970)
Biggest win
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 11–0 Armenia  Flag of Armenia.svg
(Waidhofen, Austria, 10 May 2003)
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 11–0 Armenia  Flag of Armenia.svg
(Waidhofen, Austria, 13 May 2003)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 9–0 Austria  Flag of Austria.svg
(Bari, Italy, 6 July 1970)
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 9–0 Austria  Flag of Austria.svg
(8 November 1970)
European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2017 )
Best resultSemifinals (2017)

The Austria women's national football team represents Austria in international women's football competition. The team is controlled by the Austrian Football Association.

Contents

The national team is made up mainly of players from the Austrian and German Women's Bundesligas. In 2016, the team qualified for its first-ever major tournament: UEFA Women's Euro 2017.

History

Beginnings

The Austrian team started playing on July 6, 1970, against Mexico in Bari, Italy, competing in the Women's World Cup 1970, [3] unofficial competition held in that country from July 6 to July 15, 1970. The result was a 9–0 crushing defeat, which remains one of its worst results in its history, with this result Austria was quickly out of the competition, playing after months against Switzerland, repeating itself again the defeat against Mexico, 9–0.

It played two recognized friendlies against Switzerland before the first Women's World Cup in 1978 and 1990, losing both by 6–2 and 5–1. The Austrian team did not participate in the inaugural Women's World Cup 1991 in China and also the 1995 edition in Sweden, but during that time played international friendlies. Austria played Women's Euro 1997 Qualifiers, held in Norway and Sweden. It was placed in Class B, in Group 7 with Switzerland, Yugoslavia and Greece, winning three games in a single chance against their three opponents, tying a game against Greece and losing two against Switzerland and Yugoslavia, finishing third in the group and eliminated from both tournaments. Thus, Austria did not enter the 1999 World Cup Qualifiers, held in the United States. Austria ended 1999 with three games of qualifying for the Euro 2001.

2000s and 2010s

The team started 2000 with a 3–0 defeat against Belgium, four days later they lost again, with Poland by 3–2 but won 1–0 against Wales, finishing third and returning to be eliminated from a tournament. The Austrians played their first game of the 2003 World Cup Qualification against Scotland losing 2–1 with goal from Stallinger in the 21st minute, then played against Wales and won 2–0 with another goal from Stallinger and one from Schalkhammer-Hufnagl. Their third match against Belgium was a 3–1 defeat, with a goal by Spieler in the 59th minute. Austria lost their second match against Belgium 4–2, with goals from Szankovich and Fuhrmann, after a month, the team played against Scotland, with a crushing defeat for 5–0 and finally a 1–1 draw with Wales with Austria's only goal coming from Spieler in the 45th minute, ending with 4 points from one win, one tie and four losses, and thus eliminated. The latest and best performing competition of Austria was the qualification for the Women's World Cup in 2011, where they started out poorly but reached third place with 10 points, the product of three wins, one draw and four defeats. They played the 2015 Women's World Cup Qualification, but failed to qualify.

Results and fixtures

Legend

  Win  Draw  Lose  Fixture

2020

22 September UEFA Women's Euro 2022 qualifying Kazakhstan  Flag of Kazakhstan.svg0–5Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Shymkent, Kazakhstan
12:00
Report
Stadium: Namyz Stadium
Attendance: 0
27 November UEFA Women's Euro 2022 qualifying France  Flag of France.svg3–0Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Guingamp, France
Report Stadium: Stade de Roudourou
Referee: Esther Staubli (Switzerland)
1 December UEFA Women's Euro 2022 qualifying Austria  Flag of Austria.svg1–0Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia Altach, Austria
Report Stadium: Altach Arena
Referee: Tess Olofsson (Sweden)

2021

19 February Friendly Austria  Flag of Austria.svg1–6Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Paola, Malta
15:00  UTC+1 Report
Stadium: Hibernians Stadium
Referee: Zuzana Valentová (Slovakia)
23 February Friendly Austria  Flag of Austria.svg1–0Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia Paola, Malta
18:30  UTC+1
Report Stadium: Hibernians Stadium
Referee: Alina Pesu (Romania)
11 April Friendly Austria  Flag of Austria.svg2–2Flag of Finland.svg  Finland Ritzing, Austria
13:30
Report
Stadium: Sonnenseestadion
Referee: Eszter Urban (Hungary)
14 June Friendly Austria  Flag of Austria.svg2–3Flag of Italy.svg  Italy Wiener Neustadt, Austria
16:30
Report
Stadium: Stadion Wiener Neustadt
Referee: Riem Hussein (Germany)
17 September 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup qualifying Latvia  Flag of Latvia.svg1–8Flag of Austria.svg  Austria Liepāja, Latvia
15:30 (16:30 EEST) Zaičikova Soccerball shade.svg 12' Report
Stadium: Daugava Stadium
Referee: Triinu Laos (Estonia)

Coaching staff

Current coaching staff

PositionNameRef.
Head coach Irene Fuhrmann

Manager history

Players

Current squad

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Manuela Zinsberger (1995-10-19) 19 October 1995 (age 25)680 Flag of England.svg Arsenal
231 GK Jasmin Pal (1996-08-24) 24 August 1996 (age 25)10 Flag of Germany.svg SC Sand
211 GK Isabella Kresche (1998-11-28) 28 November 1998 (age 22)00 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten

72 DF Carina Wenninger (1991-02-06) 6 February 1991 (age 30)1056 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich
132 DF Virginia Kirchberger (1993-05-25) 25 May 1993 (age 28)822 Flag of Germany.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
192 DF Verena Hanshaw (1994-01-20) 20 January 1994 (age 27)747 Flag of Germany.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
122 DF Laura Wienroither (1999-01-13) 13 January 1999 (age 22)130 Flag of Germany.svg 1899 Hoffenheim
112 DF Marina Georgieva (1997-04-13) 13 April 1997 (age 24)60 Flag of Germany.svg SC Sand
2 DF Yvonne Weilharter (2000-12-08) 8 December 2000 (age 20)60 Flag of Germany.svg RB Leipzig
22 DF Sabrina Horvat (1997-07-03) 3 July 1997 (age 24)10 Flag of Germany.svg 1. FC Köln
42 DF Celina Degen (2001-05-16) 16 May 2001 (age 20)00 Flag of Germany.svg 1899 Hoffenheim
32 DF Valentina Kröll (2002-12-06) 6 December 2002 (age 18)00 Flag of Austria.svg Sturm Graz

173 MF Sarah Puntigam (1992-10-13) 13 October 1992 (age 28)11015 Flag of France.svg Montpellier HSC
93 MF Sarah Zadrazil (1993-02-19) 19 February 1993 (age 28)8311 Flag of Germany.svg Bayern Munich
103 MF Laura Feiersinger (1993-04-05) 5 April 1993 (age 28)8315 Flag of Germany.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
163 MF Jasmin Eder (1992-10-08) 8 October 1992 (age 28)511 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten
83 MF Barbara Dunst (1997-09-25) 25 September 1997 (age 23)435 Flag of Germany.svg Eintracht Frankfurt
143 MF Marie Höbinger (2001-07-01) 1 July 2001 (age 20)103 Flag of Germany.svg Turbine Potsdam
183 MF Lara Felix (2003-04-01) 1 April 2003 (age 18)10 Flag of Austria.svg SV Neulengbach
53 MF Maria Plattner (2001-05-15) 15 May 2001 (age 20)10 Flag of Germany.svg Turbine Potsdam

154 FW Nicole Billa (1996-03-05) 5 March 1996 (age 25)6830 Flag of Germany.svg 1899 Hoffenheim
204 FW Lisa Makas (1992-05-11) 11 May 1992 (age 29)6418 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten
224 FW Stefanie Enzinger (1990-11-25) 25 November 1990 (age 30)211 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten
64 FW Katja Wienerroither (2002-01-03) 3 January 2002 (age 19)42 Flag of Switzerland.svg Grashopper Zürich
4 FW Annelie Leitner (1996-06-15) 15 June 1996 (age 25)10 Flag of Spain.svg Zaragoza

Recent call-ups

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Vanessa Gritzner (1997-11-14) 14 November 1997 (age 23)00 Flag of Austria.svg Sturm Graz v. Flag of Finland.svg  Finland, 11 April 2021
GK Kristin Krammer (2002-05-24) 24 May 2002 (age 19)10 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia, 23 February 2021
GK Melissa Abiral (1994-07-18) 18 July 1994 (age 27)00 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan, 22 September 2020 SBY

DF Katharina Schiechtl (1993-02-27) 27 February 1993 (age 28)546 Flag of Germany.svg Werder Bremen v. Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia, 17 September 2021 INJ
DF Katharina Naschenweng (1997-12-16) 16 December 1997 (age 23)210 Flag of Germany.svg 1899 Hoffenheim v. Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia, 17 September 2021 INJ
DF Stefanie Großgasteiger (2001-01-27) 27 January 2001 (age 20)00 Flag of Austria.svg Sturm Graz v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, 14 June 2021
DF Julia Mak (2000-05-31) 31 May 2000 (age 21)00 Flag of Austria.svg Sturm Graz v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, 14 June 2021
DF Anna Bereuter (2001-11-27) 27 November 2001 (age 19)00 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten v. Flag of Finland.svg  Finland, 11 April 2021
DF Viktoria Schnaderbeck (captain) (1991-01-04) 4 January 1991 (age 30)772 Flag of England.svg Arsenal v. Flag of France.svg  France, 27 November 2020 INJ
DF Nicole Sauer (1997-01-28) 28 January 1997 (age 24)00 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan, 22 September 2020 SBY

MF Lisa Kolb (2001-05-14) 14 May 2001 (age 20)20 Flag of Germany.svg Freiburg v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, 14 June 2021
MF Annabel Schasching (2002-07-26) 26 July 2002 (age 19)00 Flag of Austria.svg Sturm Graz v. Flag of Italy.svg  Italy, 14 June 2021
MF Lilli Purtscheller (2003-08-12) 12 August 2003 (age 18)00 Flag of Austria.svg Sturm Graz v. Flag of Finland.svg  Finland, 11 April 2021
MF Lena Triendl (2000-03-10) 10 March 2000 (age 21)00 Flag of Germany.svg SC Sand v. Flag of Finland.svg  Finland, 11 April 2021
MF Jennifer Klein (1999-01-11) 11 January 1999 (age 22)151 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia, 23 February 2021
MF Julia Hickelsberger (1999-08-01) 1 August 1999 (age 22)125 Flag of Austria.svg St. Pölten v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan, 22 September 2020
MF Julia Kofler (1998-09-02) 2 September 1998 (age 23)00 Flag of Germany.svg Werder Bremen v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan, 22 September 2020 SBY

FW Elisabeth Mayr (1996-01-18) 18 January 1996 (age 25)80 Flag of Switzerland.svg Basel v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia, 23 February 2021
FW Besijana Pireci (1999-10-18) 18 October 1999 (age 21)00 Flag of Austria.svg Landhaus Wien v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia, 23 February 2021
FW Viktoria Pinther (1998-10-16) 16 October 1998 (age 22)281 Flag of Austria.svg Altach/Vorderland v. Flag of Serbia.svg  Serbia, 1 December 2020
FW Sophie Maierhofer (1996-08-09) 9 August 1996 (age 25)221 Flag of Austria.svg Sturm Graz v. Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan, 22 September 2020 SBY

Notes:

Records

As of 17 September 2021 after the match against Flag of Latvia.svg  Latvia.
Players in bold are still active in the national team.

Competitive record

FIFA Women's World Cup

FIFA Women's World Cup record
YearResultPldWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did not enter
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995
Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg 1999
Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg 2003 Did not qualify
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007
Flag of Germany.svg 2011
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015
Flag of France.svg 2019
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Flag of New Zealand.svg 2023 To be determined
Total0/9-------
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

UEFA Women's Championship

UEFA Women's Championship record
YearResultPldWD*LGFGAGD
1984 Did not enter
Flag of Norway.svg 1987
Flag of Germany.svg 1989
Flag of Denmark.svg 1991
Flag of Italy.svg 1993
Flag of Germany.svg 1995
Flag of Norway.svg Flag of Sweden.svg 1997 Did not qualify
Flag of Germany.svg 2001
Flag of England.svg 2005
Flag of Finland.svg 2009
Flag of Sweden.svg 2013
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2017 Semi-finals523051+4
Flag of England.svg 2022 Qualified
Total1/12523051+4
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Invitational trophies

See also

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References

  1. "Nina Burger verkündet Karriere-Ende". oefb.at (in German). 1 April 2019. Archived from the original on 10 April 2019. Retrieved 12 October 2019.
  2. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 20 August 2021. Retrieved 20 August 2021.
  3. "Coppa del Mondo (Women) 1970". www.rsssf.com.
  4. "Austria mourns Ernst Weber". UEFA. 7 April 2011. Retrieved 12 April 2021. until 1999 before switching to take charge of the women's national team
  5. "Fuhrmann: I've always stuck to my path". FIFA. 22 October 2020. Retrieved 12 April 2021. After nine years coaching the Austrian women’s team, from 2011 to 2020, Dominik Thalhammer recently handed over the reins to Irene Fuhrmann
  6. "Irene Fuhrmann wird erste Teamchefin der ÖFB-Frauen" [Irene Fuhrmann becomes the first team leader of the ÖFB women] (in German). Sky Sport Austria. 27 July 2020. Retrieved 12 April 2021.
  7. "Squad for World cup qualification start in Latvia and North Macedonia". oefb.at.
  8. "Cyprus Women's Cup". www.rsssf.com.