Bishop of Chur

Last updated
Bishop of Chur
Catholic
Incumbent:
Joseph Maria Bonnemain
Information
First holderAsinio
Diocese Chur
Cathedral Chur Cathedral
Chur Cathedral Chur Kathedrale 1.jpg
Chur Cathedral

The Bishop of Chur (German: Bischof von Chur) is the ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Chur, Grisons, Switzerland (Latin: Dioecesis Curiensis). [1] [2]

Contents

History

A Bishop of Chur is first mentioned in 451/452 when Asinius attended the Synod of Milan, [3] but probably existed a century earlier. According to local tradition, the first Bishop of Chur was Saint Lucius, who is said to have died a martyr at Chur about the year 176, and whose relics are preserved in the cathedral. In the 7th century the bishopric acquired several territories south to the Lake of Constance. The see was at first suffragan to the archbishop of Milan, but after the treaty of Verdun (843) it became suffragan to Mainz. In 958 Holy Roman Emperor Otto I gave the bishopric to his vassal Hartpert with numerous privileges including control over the Septimer Pass, at the time the main pass through the central Alps. These concessions strengthened the bishopric's temporal power and later it became a princedom within the Holy Roman Empire.

At the time of the Hohenstaufen emperors in the 12th to early 13th centuries, some bishops of Chur were appointed by the emperor, which for a period led to existence of two bishops at the same time, the other being appointed by the pope. In the 14th century bishop Siegfried von Gelnhausen acquired the imperial diocese of Chur from the Barons Von Vaz and represented emperor Henry VII in Italy.

In 1803 the see became immediately subject to the Holy See. Until 1997, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vaduz had been part of the diocese of Chur. As of May 20, 2019, the position of is vacant, though Pierre Bürcher runs the Diocese as apostolic administrator. [4] [5]

List of Bishops of Chur

TermBishopNotes
ca. 176Lucius
452-455Asinio
ca. 460Pruritius
ca. 470Claudian
ca. 485Ursicinus I
ca. 495Sidonius
ca. 520Eddo
530-546Valentinianus
548-?Paulinus
ca. 590Theodore
ca. 614 Victor I
 ?Verendarius ?
 ?-681Ruthard
681-696Paschal
696?-712 Victor II
712-735Vigilius
ca. 740Adalbert
754-760Ursicinus II
759-765 Tello
773-800?Constantius
800-820Remigius
820-833 Victor III
833-844Verendarius
844-849Gerbrach
849-879Hesso
879-887Rothar
887-914Dietholf
914-949Waldo I
949-968Hartbert
969-995Hiltibold
995-1002Waldo II
1002–1026Ulrich I
1026–1039Hartmann I
1039–1070Dietmar
1070–1078Heinrich I
1079–1088Norbert
1089–1095Ulrich II von Tarasp
1095–1122Guido
1122–1142Konrad I von Biberegg
1142–1150Konrad II von Tegerfelden
1150–1160 Adalgod
1160–1170Egino von Ehrenfels
1170–1179Ulrich III von Tegerfelden
1179–1180Bruno von Ehrenfels
1180–1193Heinrich II von Arbon
1194?-1200Arnold I von Matsch
1200–1209Rainier
1209Walter von Tegerfelden
1209–1221Arnold II von Matsch
1221–1222Heinrich III von Realta and/or

Albrecht von Güttingen, Abbot of St. Gall

1222–1226Rudolf I von Güttingen
1226–1233Berthold Graf von Helfenstein
1233–1237Ulrich IV Graf von Kyburg
1237–1251Volkhard von Neuenburg
1251–1272Heinrich IV Graf von Montfort
1272–1282Konrad III von Belmont
1282–1290Friedrich I Graf von Montfort
1290–1298Berthold II Graf von Heiligenberg
1298Hugo Graf von Montfort
1298–1321Siegfried von Geilnhausen
1321–1324Rudolf II Graf von Montfort
1324–1325Hermann von Eichenbach
1325–1331Johann I von Pfefferhart
1331–1355Ulrich V von Lenzburg
1355–1368 Peter Gelyto
1368–1376Friedrich II von Erdingen
1376–1388Johann II von Ehingen
1388–1390Bartholomew
1390–1416 Hartmann II, Count of Werdenberg-Sargans
1416–1417 Johann III Ambundi
1417–1440Johann IV Naso
1440–1441Konrad IV von Rechberg
1441–1453Heinrich V von Höwen Bishop of Constance
1453–1458Leonhard Wyssmayer
1458–1491Ortlieb von Brandis
1491–1503Heinrich VI von Höwen
1503–1541Paul Ziegler von Ziegelberg
1541–1548Licius Iter
1548–1565Thomas Planta
1565–1581Beatus à Porta
1581–1601Peter II von Rascher
1601–1627Giovanni V
1627–1635Joseph Mohr, von Zernez
1636–1661Giovanni VI Johann Flugi d'Apremont [6]
1661–1692Ulrich VI di Monte-Villa
1692–1728Ulrich VII von Federspiel
1728–1754Joseph Benedict von Rost
1755–1777Johann Anton von Federspiel
1777–1794Franz Dionysius von Rost
1794–1833 Karl Rudolf Graf von Buol-Schauenstein last prince-bishop (until 1803)
1834–1844Johann Georg Bossi
1844–1859Kaspar I de Carl ab Hohenbalken
1859–1876Nikolaus Franz Florentini
1877–1879Kaspar II Willi
1879–1888Franz Konstantin Rampa
1888–1908Johannes Fidelis Battaglia
1908–1932Georg Schmid von Grüneck
1932–1941Laurenz Matthias Vincenz
1941–1962Cristiano Caminada
1962–1990 Johannes Vonderach
1990–1997 Wolfgang Haas
1997–2007 Amédée Grab
2007–2019 Vitus Huonder
2021- Joseph Marie Bonnemain

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References

  1. "Diocese of Chur" Catholic-Hierarchy.org . David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  2. "Diocese of Chur" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. Mansi, IV, 141; Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Chur"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  4. "MGR Pierre Bürcher nommé administrateur apostolique du diocèse de Coire – Portail catholique suisse".
  5. "'Death to gays' Bishop of Chur retires".
  6. "Bishop Johann Flugi d’Apremont" Catholic-Hierarchy.org . David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016