British twenty-five pence coin

Last updated
Twenty-five pence
United Kingdom
Value£0.25
Mass28.28 g
Diameter38.61 mm
Thickness2.5 mm
Edgemilled
Composition75% Cu, 25% Ni
Years of minting19711981
Obverse
Design Queen Elizabeth II
Designer Arnold Machin
Design date1963
Reverse
British coin 25p (1981) reverse.jpg
Design Lady Diana Spencer and Charles, Prince of Wales
DesignerPhilip Nathan
Design date1981

The British decimal twenty-five pence (25p) coin was a commemorative denomination of sterling coinage issued in four designs between 1972 and 1981. These coins were a post-decimalisation continuation of the traditional crown, with the same value of a quarter of a pound. Uniquely in British decimal coinage, the coins do not have their value stated on them. This is because previous crowns rarely did so. The British regular issue coin closest to the coin’s nominal value is the twenty pence coin.

Contents

The coins were issued for commemorative purposes and were not intended for circulation, although they remain legal tender and must be accepted at Post Offices. [1] The coins weigh 28.28 g (0.9092 oz troy) and have a diameter of 38.61 mm.

Twenty-five pence coin issues were discontinued after 1981 due to the prohibitive cost to the Royal Mint of producing such large coins with such small value. From 1990 the "crown" was revived as the commemorative five pound coin, having the same dimensions and weight but a value twenty times as great. The two can be distinguished because the five pound coin is marked with its value.

Designs

The following 25p coins were produced:

1972 issue1972: To celebrate the Silver wedding anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

Obverse: The standard portrait of Queen Elizabeth II by Arnold Machin with the inscription D·G·REG·F·D· ELIZABETH II.

Reverse: The initials EP crowned and with a floral garland, with a naked figure of Eros at the centre. The inscription reads: ELIZABETH AND PHILIP20 NOVEMBER 1947 - 1972. This face was also designed by Arnold Machin.

Both faces are encircled by dots. The edge of the coin is milled. There were 7,452,100 cupronickel coins [2] and 100,000 silver coins issued.

1977 issue1977: To celebrate Queen Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee.

Obverse: A portrait of Queen Elizabeth II riding a horse, in a similar style to the 1953 crown celebrating her coronation. The inscription reads ELIZABETH·II DG·REG FD 1977.

Reverse: A design showing coronation regalia. The Ampulla and Anointing Spoon used in the Queen's coronation are displayed crowned, and encircled by a floral border. These objects date from the 14th and 12th centuries respectively and have remained in continuous use.

Both faces were designed by Arnold Machin. The edge of the coin is milled. There were 37,061,160 cupronickel coins [2] and 377,000 silver coins issued.

1980 issue1980: To celebrate the eightieth birthday of Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother.

Obverse: The standard portrait of Queen Elizabeth II by Arnold Machin with the inscription D·G·REG·F·D· ELIZABETH II.

Reverse: A portrait of the Queen Mother surrounded by a radiating pattern of bows and lions, a pun on her maiden name Bowes-Lyon. The inscription reads: QUEEN ELIZABETH THE QUEEN MOTHERAUGUST 4th 1980. The reverse was designed by Professor Richard Guyatt.

Both faces are encircled by dots. The edge of the coin is milled. There were 9,306,000 cupronickel coins [2] and 83,672 silver coins issued.

British coin 25p (1981).jpg
1981 issue
1981: To celebrate the wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales and Lady Diana Spencer.

Obverse: The standard portrait of Queen Elizabeth II by Arnold Machin with the inscription D·G·REG·F·D· ELIZABETH II.

Reverse: A profile portrait of Lady Diana Spencer partially covered by a profile portrait of The Prince of Wales, both facing to the left, with the inscription H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES AND LADY DIANA SPENCER 1981. This face was designed by Philip Nathan.

Both faces are encircled by dots. The edge of the coin is milled. There were 26,773,600 cupronickel coins [2] and 17,000 silver coins issued.

See also

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References

Preceded by Crown-sized British coin
19721981
Succeeded by