Quarter sovereign

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Quarter Sovereign
United Kingdom
Value0.25 pound sterling
Mass1.997 g
Diameter13.5 mm
EdgeMilled
Composition.917 gold, .083 copper or other metals
Gold.0588  troy oz
Years of minting2009–present
Mint marksPresent on some commemorative examples
Obverse
DesignReigning British monarch
Reverse
Design Saint George and the Dragon
Designer Benedetto Pistrucci
Design date1817

The quarter sovereign is a British bullion or collectors' coin, whose introduction was announced by the Royal Mint in January 2009. [1] Comprising 1.997 grams of 22 carat or 0.9170 fine gold (the crown gold standard), the 13.5 mm diameter quarter sovereign is the smallest modern legal tender British gold coin, with a nominal value of 25 pence.

It is a quarter of the weight of a 'full' sovereign with an actual gold weight (AGW) of 0.0588 troy oz. As of 2020 it continues to be minted, including some to proof quality. [2]

The Royal Mint had produced two patterns for a quarter sovereign for circulation use, one denominated as five shillings, in 1853, but this coin never went into production, in part due to concerns about the small size of the coin and likely wear in circulation. [3]

See also

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References

  1. "Quarter Sovereigns - Available February 2009". goldsovereigns.co.uk. Retrieved 2017-05-30.
  2. 2020 Five sovereign coin set
  3. OnlineCoinClub Quarter Sovereign pre-decimal