Byron Chamberlain

Last updated

Byron Chamberlain
No. 86, 87, 82, 49
Position: Tight end
Personal information
Born: (1971-10-17) October 17, 1971 (age 49)
Honolulu, Hawaii
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:242 lb (110 kg)
Career information
High school: Fort Worth (TX) Eastern Hills
College: Wayne State (NE)
NFL Draft: 1995  / Round: 7 / Pick: 222
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:167
Receiving yards:2048
Receiving touchdowns:6
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Byron Daniel Chamberlain (born October 17, 1971) is a former American football tight end in the National Football League. He played professionally for the Denver Broncos, Minnesota Vikings, and the Washington Redskins. Chamberlain won back-to-back Super Bowl Championships as a member of the Denver Broncos. (Super Bowls XXXII & XXXIII) He was voted to the 2002 Pro Bowl while with the Vikings.

Contents

Early life

Chamberlain was born in Honolulu, Hawaii. Byron grew up in San Diego, CA. After his mother remarried, his family moved to Texas. He attended and graduated from Eastern Hills High School in Fort Worth, Texas. [1] Chamberlain was a star in football, baseball and track for the Highlanders.

College career

Chamberlain's started his college career at the University of Missouri, where he made the All-Big Eight Conference freshman team. Chamberlain transferred to Wayne State College, a Division II College in Nebraska where he broke most of the receiving records. Chamberlain was a standout wide receiver at Wayne State from 1993–94. In his two seasons with the Wildcats, Chamberlain had 161 catches for 1,941 yards and 14 touchdowns and became the school's all-time leading receiver, In 1993, Chamberlain had 78 catches for 1,015 yards and seven touchdowns to help the 9-1 Wildcats lead NCAA Division II in total offense that season. He added another 83 catches for 926 yards in 1994. The 83 catches tied most in a single season by a Wildcat receiver and his 16 catches vs. Bemidji State that season ranked most in a single game by a WSC receiver. His quarterback was Brett Salisbury, both were roommates and eventual Harlon Hill Trophy finalists. Chamberlain and Salisbury are the only two players to ever be nominated in the school's history for the Harlon Hill Award.

Professional career

Chamberlain was drafted by the Denver Broncos in the 7th round (222nd overall) of the 1995 NFL Draft. [2] He played in the NFL for nine seasons. [3] Byron played for Denver Broncos, Minnesota Vikings, and the Washington Redskins in his career. He spent the 1996 World League season with the Rhein Fire and led the league with 58 receptions for 685 yards (11.8) and a league leading 8 touchdowns. Byron was a key contributor as a member of the Denver Broncos back-to-back Super Bowl wins (Super Bowl XXXII & XXXIII). He was voted to the 2002 Pro Bowl while with the Minnesota Vikings. Byron finished his career with 167 catches for 2,048 yards (12.3) with 6 touchdowns.

NFL statistics

Receiving Stats [4]

YearTeamGamesReceptionsTargetsYardsYards per ReceptionLongest ReceptionTouchdownsFirst DownsFumblesFumbles Lost
1995 DEN 51-1111.0110100
1996 DEN 1112-12910.8170900
1997 DEN 102-189.090100
1998 DEN 163-3511.7160300
1999 DEN 1632-48815.38821800
2000 DEN 1522-28312.93811200
2001 MIN 1657-66611.74732811
2002 MIN 1334-38911.46101500
2003 WSH 44-297.3150100
Career10616702,04812.38868811

Returning Stats

YearTeamGamesPunt Return AttemptsPunt Return YardsPunts Returned for TouchdownPunts Fair CaughtLongest Punt ReturnKickoff Return AttemptsKickoff Return YardsKickoff Returns for TouchdownKickoffs Fair CaughtLongest Kickoff Return
1996 DEN 11000003490021
1997 DEN 10000001130013
2000 DEN 15000002250013
Career36000006870021

Personal Life

In August 1997, Chamberlain pleaded guilty to harassment charges against his then-wife, Robyn. He was placed on probation for two years. He also was ordered to pay a $138 fine and be evaluated for drug use. Less than a month later, he was arrested and faced domestic violence charges. [5]

In 2003, Chamberlain was cut by the Vikings following a four-game suspension for using the weight-loss drug ephedra. Subsequently, he signed by the Redskins and cut again. [6]

In the fall of 2008, Chamberlain returned to Wayne State in Wayne, Nebraska to complete his degree. Friday, December 19, 2008, Chamberlain received his bachelor's degree in Communications[ citation needed ].

Chamberlain started the Byron Chamberlain Foundation in 2000 to assist underserved individuals and communities. [7] Some of the foundations programs have included sports camps for underprivileged kids, clothes and shoe drives, food drives, toy drives as well as health education.

Chamberlain is married to business developer, Angelique Chamberlain. [8]

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References

  1. "Byron Chamberlain". databaseFootball.com. Archived from the original on June 12, 2012. Retrieved October 6, 2012.
  2. "Byron Chamberlain". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 6, 2012.
  3. "Byron Chamberlain". SI.com. Retrieved October 6, 2012.
  4. "Byron Chamberlain Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved March 19, 2014.
  5. "Reserve tight end arrested in domestic violence case". Associated Press. September 19, 1997. Retrieved May 6, 2021.
  6. "Chamberlain Goes Home". 247Sports. May 14, 2004. Retrieved May 6, 2021.
  7. "About Byron Chamberlain". Byron Chamberlain Foundation. Archived from the original on December 29, 2013. Retrieved October 6, 2012.
  8. "At fashion show, NFL players' wives styling for a cause". Star Tribune. February 2, 2018.