Cumbria Constabulary

Last updated

Cumbria Constabulary
Cumbria Constabulary.png
MottoSAFER STRONGER CUMBRIA
Agency overview
Formed1974
Preceding agencies
Employees2,151 [1]
Volunteers142 [1]
Annual budget£94 million [1]
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdictionCumbria, England
England Police Forces (Cumbria).svg
Map of police area
Size2,268 square miles (5,870 km2)
Population500,000
Legal jurisdiction England & Wales
Governing body Home Office
Constituting instrument
General nature
HeadquartersCarleton Hall, Penrith
Constables1,121 [2]
Police Community Support Officers99
Police and Crime Commissioner responsible
Agency executive
Territorial Police AreasNorth, South and West
Facilities
Stations14
Website
www.cumbria.police.uk

Cumbria Constabulary is the territorial police force in England covering Cumbria. As of September 2017, the force had 1,108 police officers, 535 police staff, 93 police community support officers, 25 designated officers and 86 special constables. [3] In terms of officer numbers, it is the 7th smallest of the 48 police forces of the United Kingdom. Conversely, its geographic area of responsibility is the 7th largest police area of a territorial police force in the United Kingdom (when including Police Scotland and the Police Service of Northern Ireland). The force area's size and its population of just under 500,000 people makes it sparsely populated. The only major urban areas are Carlisle and Barrow-in-Furness.

Contents

There are significant areas of isolated and rural community, and the county has one of the smallest visible minority ethnic populations in the country at under 3.0%. Each year Cumbria, which incorporates the Lake District National Park, attracts over 23 million visitors from all over the world (46 times the local population). The county has 67 miles (108 km) of motorway and some 700 miles (1,100 km) of trunk and primary roads.

The Chief Constable is Michelle Skeer. [4] The headquarters of the force are at Carleton Hall, Penrith.

Organisation

In terms of operational policing the force is divided into two commands - the Territorial Policing Command and the Crime Command, each headed by a Chief Superintendent. [5]

Territorial Policing Command

This command is further divided into three geographic Territorial Policing Areas (TPAs) to cover the county, an operational support section and a command and control section. Each TPA is led by a Superintendent and is further divided into districts and then teams for the purposes of neighbourhood policing. The major elements of the Territorial Policing Command are as follows:

North Territorial Policing Area

Responsible for neighbourhood and response policing across the following geographic areas:

South Territorial Policing Area

Responsible for neighbourhood and response policing across the following geographic areas:

West Territorial Policing Area

Responsible for neighbourhood and response policing across the following geographic areas

Operational Support

Within this section are force wide units which support the TPAs or units from the Crime Command, or provide a specialist service:

  • Roads Policing
  • Firearms
  • Dog section
  • PSG
  • Civil Contingencies
  • Collision Investigation
  • Firearms Licensing
  • Safety Camera/CTO

Command & Control

Within this section is the Command and Control Room (dispatch), including the Force Incident Manager (FIM) and the call taking centre.

Crime Command

This command is responsible for significant investigations and is predominantly staffed by detectives. The command is divided as follows:

Collaborations

Cumbria Constabulary is a partner in the following collaboration:

History

Cumberland and Westmorland Constabulary was formed in 1856. In 1947 this force absorbed Kendal Borough Police. Less than 20 years later this amalgamated force absorbed Carlisle City Police to form a force broadly the same as today's force called the Cumberland, Westmorland and Carlisle Constabulary. In 1965, it had an establishment of 652 and an actual strength of 617. [6] In 1967 the force name was changed to Cumbria Constabulary.

In 1974 the force's boundaries were expanded to include the new non-metropolitan county of Cumbria, in particular Furness and Sedbergh Rural District.

The Home Secretary proposed on 6 February 2006 to merge it with Lancashire Constabulary. These proposals were accepted by both forces on 25 February and the merger would have taken place on 1 April 2007. [7] However, in July 2006, the Cumbria and Lancashire forces decided not to proceed with the merger because the Government could not remedy issues with the differing council tax precepts. [8]

Chief Constables

Cumbria Constabulary (1967)

Officers killed in the line of duty

The Police Roll of Honour Trust lists and commemorates all British police officers killed in the line of duty. [18]

See also

Footnotes

  1. 1 2 3 "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 21 January 2009. Retrieved 22 February 2009.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. "Tables for 'Police workforce, England and Wales, 31 March 2013". HM Government. Office for National Statistics. 31 March 2013. Retrieved 29 May 2014.
  3. "Police workforce, England and Wales: 30 September 2017". GOV.UK. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  4. "Chief Constable - Michelle Skeer". Cumbria Constabulary. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  5. "Our Departments". Cumbria Constabulary. Retrieved 9 December 2017.
  6. The Thin Blue Line, Police Council for Great Britain Staff Side Claim for Undermanning Supplements, 1965
  7. "Police force merger is approved". BBC News. 24 February 2006. Retrieved 3 April 2011.
  8. "Forces back out of merger plans". BBC News. 10 July 2006. Retrieved 3 April 2011.
  9. "DEATH OF FORMER CUMBRIA CHIEF CONSTABLE". Cumberland and Westmorland Herald. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  10. "Former police chief died having done all he wanted to do in life". Cumberland and Westmorland Herald. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  11. "Death at 65 of ex-Cumbria police chief". Cumberland and Westmorland Herald. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  12. "POLICE CHIEF RETIRES TO TAKE UP NEW CHALLENGE". Cumberland and Westmorland Herald. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  13. "County's chief constable retires". BBC NEWS. Retrieved 21 June 2018.
  14. "Stuart Hyde to fight attempt to make him leave police". BBC News. Retrieved 31 July 2018.
  15. "Cumbria's chief constable to retire a year early". News & Star. Retrieved 31 July 2018.
  16. "Who is Cumbria Police Chief Michelle Skeer?". Border - ITV News . 26 February 2016. Retrieved 31 July 2018.
  17. "Chief Constable - Michelle Skeer". Cumbria Constabulary. Retrieved 31 July 2018.
  18. 1 2 "Incorporated by Royal Charter the Police Roll of Honour Trust is the official source of the United Kingdom's Police Roll of Honour. Lest We Forget". Police Roll of Honour Trust. Retrieved 12 August 2019.
  19. "Police officer dies in motorway crash". BBC News. 27 January 2020. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  20. "Police car involved in serious crash on M6 near Carlisle". ITV News. Retrieved 27 January 2020.

Related Research Articles

Cumbria Ceremonial (geographic) county of England, UK

Cumbria is a ceremonial and non-metropolitan county in North West England. The county and Cumbria County Council, its local government, came into existence in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972. Cumbria's county town is Carlisle, in the north of the county; the only other major urban area is Barrow-in-Furness on the south-western tip of the county.

Cumberland Historic county of England

Cumberland is a historic county of North West England that had an administrative function from the 12th century until 1974. It was bordered by Northumberland to the east, County Durham to the southeast, Westmorland and Lancashire to the south, and the Scottish counties of Dumfriesshire and Roxburghshire to the north. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 and now forms part of Cumbria.

Chief Constable is the rank used by the chief police officer of every territorial police force in the United Kingdom except for the City of London Police and the Metropolitan Police, as well as the chief officers of the three 'special' national police forces, the British Transport Police, Ministry of Defence Police, and Civil Nuclear Constabulary. The title is also held by the chief officers of the principal Crown Dependency police forces, the Isle of Man Constabulary, States of Guernsey Police Service, and States of Jersey Police. The title was also held, ex officio, by the president of the Association of Chief Police Officers under the Police Reform Act 2002. It was also the title of the chief officer of the Royal Parks Constabulary until this agency was disbanded in 2004.

Avon and Somerset Constabulary territorial police force in the west of England

Avon and Somerset Constabulary is the territorial police force responsible for law enforcement in the county of Somerset and the defunct county of Avon, which includes the city and county of Bristol and the unitary authorities of Bath and North East Somerset, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire.

Northumbria Police Police force responsible for policing Northumberland and Tyne and Wear, North East England

Northumbria Police is the territorial police force responsible for policing the areas of Northumberland and Tyne and Wear in North East England.

Merseyside Police territorial police force responsible for policing Merseyside in North West England

Merseyside Police is the territorial police force responsible for policing Merseyside in North West England. The service area is 647 square kilometres with a population of around 1.5 million. As of September 2017 the service has 3,484 police officers, 1,619 police staff, 253 police community support officers, 155 designated officers and 208 special constables. In terms of officer numbers, the force is the 8th largest of the 48 police forces of the United Kingdom. However, in terms of geographic area of responsibility, it is the 3rd smallest of the territorial police forces after the City of London Police and Cleveland Police. The force is led by Chief Constable Andy Cooke.

Gwent Police territorial police force in the United Kingdom

Gwent Police is a territorial police force in Wales, responsible for policing the local authority areas of Blaenau Gwent, Caerphilly, Monmouthshire, Newport and Torfaen. Gwent Police currently employs 1,204 officers, 649 civilian staff and 217 Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs).

Lancashire Constabulary

Lancashire Constabulary is the territorial police force responsible for policing the ceremonial county of Lancashire in North West England. The force's headquarters are at Hutton, near the city of Preston. As of October 2018 the force had just under 3,000 officers as well as 2,000 Police Staff - of which 272 are police community support officers.

Hertfordshire Constabulary territorial police force responsible for policing the county of Hertfordshire in England

Hertfordshire Constabulary is the territorial police force responsible for policing the county of Hertfordshire in England. Its headquarters is in Welwyn Garden City. From 2011-2016 the force was headed by Chief Constable Andy Bliss, the current Chief Constable is Charlie Hall QPM. As of March 2019, the force consists of over 1,900 police officers, 235 PCSOs, over 1500 police staff, as well as being supported by more than 410 special constables.

Durham Constabulary

Durham Constabulary is the territorial police force responsible for policing the non-metropolitan county of County Durham and the unitary authority of Darlington. The force covers the 2,232 km² of the county which has a resident population of 595,308. It is one of the smaller forces of the 43 territorial police forces that service England and Wales. Durham is Home Office force 11.

Hampshire Constabulary police service of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight, England

Hampshire Constabulary is the territorial police force responsible for policing the counties of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight in South East England.

Kent Police

Kent Police is the territorial police force for Kent in England.

Sussex Police police force in Sussex, England

Sussex Police is the territorial police force responsible for policing the county of Sussex in southern England. Its headquarters is located in Malling House, Lewes, East Sussex.

Nottinghamshire Police

Nottinghamshire Police is the territorial police force responsible for policing the shire county of Nottinghamshire and the unitary authority of Nottingham in the East Midlands of England. The area has a population of just over 1 million.

Suffolk Constabulary

Suffolk Constabulary is the territorial police force responsible for policing Suffolk in East Anglia, England.

Lincolnshire Police

Lincolnshire Police is the territorial police force covering the non-metropolitan county of Lincolnshire in the East Midlands of England. Despite the name, the force's area does not include North East Lincolnshire and North Lincolnshire, which are covered by Humberside Police instead.

Cumbria Fire and Rescue Service

Cumbria Fire and Rescue Service is the statutory fire and rescue service for the Shire county of Cumbria, England. Of the 38 fire stations, there are six wholetime. 2-day crewed and 30 retained. Since 2012 the headquarters are at Penrith next to the headquarters of Cumbria Constabulary.

John Kent was a British police constable at Maryport, then with the Carlisle City Police, and is reported to be the first black police officer in Britain. He served seven years in the office of constable at Carlisle before being dismissed from his role in 1844. He then became a court bailiff, then a Parish Constable at Longtown. Until 2006, when a former officer of Cumbria Constabulary discovered Kent's employment records, it was thought that Britain's first black police officer was Norwell Roberts, who was an officer with the Metropolitan Police starting in 1966. The discovery has been heralded by the UK National Black Police Association as having "huge significance" as well as being "totally unexpected".

Sir John Dunne was the Chief Constable of Cumberland and Westmorland Constabulary for 45 years.