Dennis Gaubatz

Last updated
Dennis Gaubatz
No. 53
Born: (1940-02-11) February 11, 1940 (age 81)
Needville, TX
Career information
Position(s) LB
Height6 ft 2 in (188 cm)
Weight232 lb (105 kg)
College Louisiana State
AFL draft 1963 / Round: 25 / Pick: 199
NFL draft 1963 / Round: 8 / Pick 111
Career history
As player
1963–1964 Detroit Lions
1965–1969 Baltimore Colts
Career highlights and awards

Dennis Earl Gaubatz (born February 11, 1940) is a former American football player who played linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for the Detroit Lions and the Baltimore Colts.

Gaubatz played college football at Louisiana State University and was selected in the eighth round (111th overall) of the 1963 NFL Draft by the Lions. He was traded to the Colts for running back Joe Don Looney and an undisclosed draft choice on June 3, 1965. [1]

He intercepted ten passes and recovered six fumbles in his seven-year NFL career, and was part of the Colts' 1968 NFL Championship team. [2]

Gaubatz was on the cover of Sports Illustrated in November 1965. [3]

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References

  1. "Gaubatz, Lion Linebacker, Traded to Colts for Looney". New York Times. November 29, 1965. p. 30.
  2. "Dennis Gaubatz NFL Football Statistics". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 9, 2016.
  3. Maule, Tex (November 29, 1965). "Heroes without headlines". Sports Illustrated. p. 30.