Donovan Ruddock

Last updated
Donovan Ruddock
Statistics
Nickname(s)Razor
Weight(s) Heavyweight
Height6 ft 3 in (191 cm)
Reach82 in (208 cm)
NationalityCanadian
Born (1963-12-21) December 21, 1963 (age 57)
St. Catherine, Jamaica
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights47
Wins40
Wins by KO30
Losses6
Draws1

Donovan "Razor" Ruddock (born December 21, 1963) is a Jamaican-born Canadian former professional boxer who competed from 1982 to 2001, and in 2015. He is known for his two fights against Mike Tyson in 1991, and a fight against Lennox Lewis in 1992. Ruddock was also known for his exceptional heavy punching power: one of the best examples of his left hand power was his knockout of former WBA heavyweight champion Michael Dokes in 1990. His favoured weapon at the ring proved to be a highly versatile half-hook, half-uppercut left-handed punch he called "The Smash," which accounted for the majority of his knockout wins, and also happened to be his major downside during his entire career, as he didn't throw a single right hand during most of knockout flurries, being a left-handed puncher fighting out of the orthodox stance. [1]

Contents

Professional career

Early years

Ruddock was born in St. Catherine, Jamaica. [2] At age 11, he left Jamaica with his family and moved to Toronto, settling in the city's Weston neighbourhood. [3] Ruddock attended Emery Collegiate Institute and Westview Centennial Secondary School, when he was a teenager. [4]

As an amateur boxer, Ruddock had a win over Lennox Lewis in March 1980 in Toronto at the Ontario Junior Boxing Championship, winning via a split decision (3:2) in the 75 kg weight class (165 lbs). [5] He turned pro in 1982, but his career started slowly, having only 11 fights between 1982 and 1985. He won eight of his first nine fights, but drew his fifth. More controversy would follow in April 1985 when he lost to journeyman David Jaco, who would be KO'd by a young Mike Tyson the next year. After eight rounds Ruddock's corner threw in the towel when he complained of breathing problems. Jaco was awarded a TKO victory. It was discovered Ruddock had a rare respiratory illness and doctors told him his career would be over.

Return to the ring

After taking 10 months off after rehabilitation Ruddock made a full recovery to the doctors' surprise and resumed his boxing career winning 9 straight fights, 8 of them by KO also picking up an impressive decision win over former WBA heavyweight title-holder Mike Weaver before winning the Canadian heavyweight championship by a first-round knockout against Ken Lakusta in 1988.

In 1989, after two more wins by KO, a fight with another former WBA heavyweight title-holder was made, against the hard-hitting James "Bonecrusher" Smith. In the round 2, Ruddock was floored heavily by Smith but showed his heart by getting up, coming back in the round, and impressively knocking out Smith in round 7.

A title bout was made with undisputed heavyweight champion Mike Tyson, scheduled for November 1989 in Edmonton, Alberta. [6] Tyson, claiming illness, cancelled and opted instead to fight James "Buster" Douglas in Tokyo. Tyson would go on to lose in one of the biggest upsets in boxing history.

Ruddock vs Dokes

In 1990, Ruddock fought former heavyweight champion Michael Dokes. Ruddock went into the fight as underdog but put on one of the best performances of his career knocking out Dokes in the 4th round. Dokes appeared to be seriously stunned on the ropes after taking Ruddock's famous "Smash" left hook. A right hand followed, which appeared to put Dokes out, but Ruddock threw another two hooks to knock Dokes out cold for several minutes.

Difficulty finding opponents

After another KO win over Kimmuel Odum in 1990, Ruddock had difficulty finding a marquee opponent. [7] Ruddock hoped to fight Evander Holyfield (fresh from a KO win over James "Buster" Douglas for the heavyweight championship). Instead, Holyfield opted to fight 42-year-old George Foreman. [8]

Mike Tyson

With no big name opponent, Ruddock took a warm up fight against Mike Rouse in December 1990 winning by 1st round knockout. In January 1991, Mike Tyson accepted Ruddock's challenge and fight was scheduled for March 18. It would pit Tyson, the number #1 contender, against Ruddock who was number #2, for the right to fight the winner of Holyfield-Foreman. Ruddock was dropped in round three but fought back until referee Richard Steele stopped the fight in Tyson's favor during round 7. Some fans were unhappy with the decision and fights erupted in the stadium. Steele had to be escorted out of the ring after the angry protests. A rematch was held June 28, 1991 and lasted a full 12 rounds. Tyson knocked Ruddock down twice during the bout, and won by unanimous decision. Both fighters were injured; Ruddock had a broken jaw and Tyson suffered a perforated eardrum. Sports Illustrated reported that Ruddock's jaw may have been broken as early as the fourth round. [9] Tyson was magnanimous after his triumph, praising Ruddock as a great heavyweight: "Man this guy is tough, he'll be champion of the world one day if he stays dedicated and doesn't slip up."

After Tyson

After losing to Tyson for the second time, Ruddock picked up victories over former heavyweight champion Greg Page and got a win over undefeated hope Phil Jackson; both fights again were won by KO. Those victories set up a bout with Lennox Lewis in London on Halloween 1992. The bout was an official WBC Final Eliminator and seen as an elimination bout for the opportunity to face the winner of the upcoming Bowe - Holyfield match. [10] Ruddock was knocked out in the second round.[ citation needed ]

After more than two years out after the Lewis defeat Ruddock came back in 1994 with a points win over Anthony Wade which led to a fight with Tommy Morrison in 1995. In the first round he put Morrison down, but let the opportunity for an early stoppage slip, and was given a count himself in the second round after grabbing the ropes after being caught by a Morrison uppercut. Again, like the first Tyson fight, Ruddock was controversially stopped on his feet in the 6th round.[ citation needed ]

Comeback

After the loss to Morrison, Ruddock disappeared for 3 years until he returned once again in 1998. Ruddock was scheduled to challenge Vitali Klitschko for the WBO heavyweight title in April 2000, yet was forced to withdraw at late notice due to injury. [11] After building up a winning streak against journeymen opponents, Ruddock won the Canadian heavyweight title for a second time with a tenth round win over Egerton Marcus in October 2001, then retired with a record of 38 wins (28 KOs), 5 losses and 1 draw.[ citation needed ]

On March 28, 2015, Ruddock returned to the ring with a fifth round knockout win over Raymond Olubowale [12] and scored a 6 round majority points decision over Eric Barrak two months later, but was defeated by 3 round KO by Dillon Carman on September 11, 2015 in a bid for the Canadian heavyweight title.

Legacy

Ruddock was ranked 70th on The Ring magazine's list of "The 100 Greatest Punchers of All-Time". [13]

Life after boxing

In the late 1990s, Ruddock had filed for bankruptcy as a number of failed investments, including $1 million that he lost when his Fort Lauderdale nightclub "Razor's Palace" went under; had left him cash poor. A contract dispute ruined a close relationship with his brother and former manager, Delroy. [14]

In 2006, Ruddock invented a non-electrical garbage collector called The Razor which he hoped would become a success. Ruddock marketed the device he designed one day after becoming increasingly frustrated with the amount of waste his family was collecting, [15] and sold it from his website Razorruddock.com. As of November 2013, the site is no longer online and the product is listed on Amazon as unavailable with no indication for future availability. [16]

Professional boxing record

Professional record summary
47 fights40 wins6 losses
By knockout305
By decision91
By disqualification10
Draws1
No.ResultRecordOpponentTypeRound, timeDateLocationNotes
47Loss40–6–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Dillon CarmanKO3 (8), 2:05Sep 11, 2015 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Ricoh Coliseum, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaFor Canada heavyweight title
46Win40–5–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Eric BarrakMD6May 22, 2015 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Colisée Isabelle-Brasseur, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, Canada
45Win39–5–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Raymond OlubowaleTKO5 (6), 1:00Mar 28, 2015 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Hershey Centre, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
44Win38–5–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Egerton Marcus TKO10 (12), 2:48Oct 12, 2001 Flag of the United States.svg Convention and Civic Center, Niagara Falls, New York, U.S.Won vacant Canada heavyweight title
43Win37–5–1 Flag of the United States.svg Harold SconiersSD10Apr 27, 2001 Flag of the United States.svg Convention and Civic Center, Niagara Falls, New York, U.S.
42Win36–5–1 Flag of Cuba.svg Jose Ribalta KO1 (10), 1:40Oct 8, 1999 Flag of the United States.svg Turning Stone Resort Casino, Verona, New York, U.S.
41Win35–5–1 Flag of Mexico.svg Mike SedilloTKO8 (10), 1:19Jul 20, 1999 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Casino Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
40Win34–5–1 Flag of the United States.svg Derek AmosTKO1 (10)May 27, 1999 Flag of the United States.svg Mountaineer Casino Racetrack and Resort, Chester, West Virginia, U.S.
39Win33–5–1 Flag of the United States.svg Anthony WillisTKO6 (10), 2:40Feb 19, 1999 Flag of the United States.svg Turning Stone Resort Casino, Verona, New York, U.S.
38Win32–5–1 Flag of the United States.svg Tony LaRosaTKO3 (10)Jan 21, 1999 Flag of the United States.svg Grand Casino Avoyelles, Marksville, Louisiana, U.S.
37Win31–5–1 Flag of Puerto Rico.svg Rodolfo MarinTKO8 (10)Aug 11, 1998 Flag of the United States.svg Miccosukee Resort & Gaming, Miami, Florida, U.S.
36Win30–5–1 Flag of the United States.svg Tony BradhamKO2 (10), 2:31Jun 26, 1998 Flag of the United States.svg DePaul Alumni Hall, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
35Win29–5–1 Flag of the United States.svg Brian YatesTKO4 (10)Apr 16, 1998 Flag of the United States.svg North Vernon, Indiana, U.S.
34Loss28–5–1 Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Morrison TKO6 (12), 2:55 Jun 10, 1995 Flag of the United States.svg Municipal Auditorium, Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.For vacant IBC heavyweight title
33Win28–4–1 Flag of the United States.svg Anthony WadeUD10Jan 29, 1994 Flag of the United States.svg MGM Grand Garden Arena, Paradise, Nevada, U.S.
32Loss27–4–1 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Lennox Lewis TKO2 (12), 0:46 Oct 31, 1992 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Earls Court Exhibition Centre, London, EnglandWBC heavyweight title eliminator, For Commonwealth heavyweight title
31Win27–3–1 Flag of the United States.svg Phil Jackson KO4 (12), 2:12Jun 26, 1992 Flag of the United States.svg CSU Convocation Center, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.Won vacant IBC heavyweight title
30Win26–3–1 Flag of the United States.svg Greg Page RTD8 (10), 3:00Feb 15, 1992 Flag of the United States.svg The Mirage, Paradise, Nevada, U.S.
29Loss25–3–1 Flag of the United States.svg Mike Tyson UD12 Jun 28, 1991 Flag of the United States.svg The Mirage, Paradise, Nevada, U.S.
28Loss25–2–1 Flag of the United States.svg Mike Tyson TKO7 (12), 2:22 Mar 18, 1991 Flag of the United States.svg The Mirage, Paradise, Nevada, U.S.
27Win25–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Mike RouseKO1 (10), 2:37Dec 8, 1990 Flag of the United States.svg Convention Hall, Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.
26Win24–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Kimmuel OdumKO3 (10), 2:58Aug 18, 1990 Flag of the United States.svg Broadway by the Bay Theater, Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.
25Win23–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Michael Dokes TKO4 (12), 0:53Apr 4, 1990 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.Won WBA Inter-Continental heavyweight title
24Win22–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg James Smith KO7 (10), 2:18Jul 2, 1989 Flag of the United States.svg Cumberland County Memorial Auditorium, Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S.
23Win21–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg James Broad TKO1 (10), 2:58Dec 6, 1988 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Metro Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
22Win20–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Reggie Gross TKO2 (10), 1:36Jun 27, 1988 Flag of the United States.svg Convention Hall, Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.
21Win19–1–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Ken LakustaKO1 (12)May 28, 1988 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Saskatchewan Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaWon vacant Canada heavyweight title
20Win18–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Larry AlexanderKO2 (10), 2:08Apr 26, 1988 Flag of the United States.svg The Showplace, Camden, New Jersey, U.S.
19Win17–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Eddie RichardsonKO4 (10), 1:42Nov 24, 1987 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Forum, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
18Win16–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Juan QuintanaTKO2 (10), 0:51Aug 9, 1987 Flag of the United States.svg State Theatre, Easton, Pennsylvania, U.S.
17Win15–1–1 Flag of Cuba.svg Carlos HernandezDQ7 (10), 0:27Jun 15, 1987 Flag of the United States.svg Convention Hall, Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.Hernandez disqualified for attempting to punch the referee
16Win14–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Robert EvansTKO5 (10), 0:58May 16, 1987 Flag of the United States.svg State Theatre, Easton, Pennsylvania, U.S.
15Win13–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Mike Weaver SD10Aug 23, 1986 Flag of the United States.svg Cumberland County Memorial Auditorium, Fayetteville, North Carolina, U.S.
14Win12–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Al HouckTKO1 (8), 1:30Jul 8, 1986 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Forum, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
13Win11–1–1 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg John WestgarthKO7 (8)May 28, 1986 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Alexandra Palace, London, England
12Win10–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg Carlton JonesKO1 (6), 2:04Feb 26, 1986 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg St. Lawrence Market, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
11Loss9–1–1 Flag of the United States.svg David Jaco RTD8 (10), 3:00Apr 30, 1985 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Sportsplex, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
10Win9–0–1 Flag of the United States.svg Oscar HolmanUD8Oct 20, 1984 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
9Win8–0–1 Flag of the United States.svg Ricardo PetersonUD8Jul 31, 1984 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Sportsplex, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
8Win7–0–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Cedric ParsonsTKO7 (8)Feb 28, 1984 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Sportsplex, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
7Win6–0–1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Conroy NelsonUD10Sep 25, 1983 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg CNE Coliseum, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
6Draw5–0–1 Flag of the United States.svg Phil BrownSD6Apr 26, 1983 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Paul Sauvé Arena, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
5Win5–0 Flag of the United States.svg Bill HollisUD6Apr 8, 1983 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg St. Lawrence Market, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
4Win4–0 Flag of the United States.svg Al WilliamsKO1 (6), 1:53Aug 13, 1982 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Welland Arena, Welland, Ontario, Canada
3Win3–0 Flag of the United States.svg Arthur HallMD4Jun 1, 1982 Flag of the United States.svg Tropicana, Atlantic City, New Jersey, U.S.
2Win2–0 Flag of the United States.svg Garland TiptonKO2 (6)Apr 24, 1982 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Columbus Event Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
1Win1–0 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Wes RoweTKO4 (6)Mar 20, 1982 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Columbus Event Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

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References

  1. As noted, for instance, by Bert Sugar, covering the Ruddock fight versus the former NABF Champion Larry Alexander: .
  2. Brown, Leroy (8 August 2015). "Donovan 'Razor' Ruddock Returns To Ring At Age 51". Jamaica Gleaner. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  3. Gray, Jeff (20 November 2015). "RAZOR BURN: A former champ weaves his way back into the ring". Globe & Mail Newspaper. Retrieved 23 January 2019.
  4. "The Warriors of Emery Village". Emery Village Voice. Retrieved 2019-03-19.
  5. Nack, William (1993-02-01). "The Great Brit Hope". Sports Illustrated. Time Warner. Retrieved 2007-03-22.
  6. Fernandez, Bernard (1991-01-27). "Rugged 'Razor' Ruddock Aims For World Title". Seattle Times. The Seattle Times Company. Retrieved 2008-06-20.
  7. Starkman, Randy. 1990, August 17. Good foes hard to get for Razor, The Toronto Star, F5.
  8. Starkman, Randy. 1990, October 31. Holyfield doesn't faze Razor: Toronto boxer unimpressed by third-round KO of Douglas, The Toronto Star, D8.
  9. "Smash Dance". CNN. 1991-07-08. Retrieved 2010-05-01.
  10. J. Golden. "Lewis - Ruddock, Lennox's Big Gamble" . Retrieved 2010-04-08.[ permanent dead link ]
  11. "Long read: Invisible while standing still: Chris Byrd interview". boxingmonthly.com. 9 February 2018. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  12. "Razor Ruddock survives knockdown to win comeback at the age of 51", Boxing News, March 30, 2015. Retrieved March 30, 2015
  13. "The 100 Greatest Punchers of All-Time!". boxrec.com.
  14. "For Razor Ruddock, boxing's wounds won't heal". LasVegasSun.com.
  15. "Gelf Magazine Razor Ruddock, Inventor". gelfmagazine.com.
  16. "Amazon.com: BOXER COMPACTOR: Appliances". amazon.com.
Sporting positions
Regional boxing titles
Vacant
Title last held by
Willie de Wit
Canada heavyweight champion
May 28, 1988 – September 1989
Vacated
Vacant
Title next held by
Tony Morrison
Vacant
Title last held by
Michael Dokes
WBA Inter-Continental
heavyweight champion

April 4, 1990 – August 1990
Vacated
Vacant
Title next held by
Wladimir Klitschko
Vacant
Title last held by
Trevor Berbick
Canada heavyweight champion
October 12, 2001 – 2004
Vacated
Vacant
Title next held by
Patrice L'Heureux
Minor world boxing titles
Vacant
Title last held by
Phil Jackson
IBC heavyweight champion
June 26, 1992 – December 1994
Vacated
Vacant
Title next held by
Tim Puller