Downpatrick (Parliament of Ireland constituency)

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Coordinates: 54°19′26″N5°42′11″W / 54.324°N 5.703°W / 54.324; -5.703

Contents

Downpatrick
Former borough constituency
for the Irish House of Commons
Former constituency
Created1586 (1586)
Abolished1800
Seats2
Replaced by Downpatrick

Downpatrick was a constituency represented in the Irish House of Commons until 1800.

History

In the Patriot Parliament of 1689 summoned by King James II, Downpatrick was not represented. [1]

Members of Parliament, 1586–1801

1689–1801

ElectionFirst memberFirst partySecond memberSecond party
1689Downpatrick was not represented in the Patriot Parliament
1692 James Hamilton Nicholas Price
1695 Sir John Magill, 1st Bt Francis Annesley [note 1]
1703 Mathew Forde
1705 Isaac Manley
1713 Francis Annesley
1715 Sir Emanuel Moore, 3rd Bt Thomas Medlycott
1727 Edward Southwell Cromwell Price
1755 Bowen Southwell
1761 Mathew Forde Hon. Francis Charles Annesley
1771 Clotworthy Rowley
1776 Hon. Robert Henry Southwell
1783 Hon. Hercules Rowley [note 2]
October 1783 Andrew Caldwell
1790 Jonathan Chetwood
1798 Josias Rowley
1801 Succeeded by the Westminster constituency Downpatrick

Notes

  1. Expelled in 1703
  2. Also elected for Antrim County in 1783, for which he chose to sit

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References

  1. O'Hart 2007, p. 501.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Parliamentary Papers, Volume 62, Part 2. p. 612.

Bibliography