England women's national rugby union team

Last updated

England
Nickname(s)Red Roses
EmblemRed Rose
UnionRugby Football Union
Head coach Simon Middleton
Captain Sarah Hunter
Most caps Rochelle Clark (137)
Top scorer Emily Scarratt (640)
Top try scorer Sue Day (61)
Home stadium Twickenham
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First colours
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Second colours
World Rugby ranking
Current1 (as of 23 November 2020)
Highest1 (2012–2013, 2014–2015, 2017, 2020–)
Lowest4 (2015)
First international
Flag of England.svg  England 22-4 Wales  Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg
(5 April 1987)
Biggest win
Flag of England.svg  England 101–0 South Africa  Flag of South Africa.svg
(14 May 2005)
Biggest defeat
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 67–0 England  Flag of England.svg
(13 August 1997)
World Cup
Appearances8 (First in 1991)
Best resultChampions, 1994, 2014

The England women's national rugby union team, also known as the Red Roses, represents England in women's international rugby union. They compete in the annual Women's Six Nations Championship with France, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. England have won the championship on a total of 16 out of 25 occasions – winning the Grand Slam 15 times and the Triple Crown 21 times – making them the most successful side in the tournament's history. They won the Women's Rugby World Cup in 1994 and 2014, and have been runners-up on five other occasions. Their coach is Simon Middleton.

Contents

History

England at the 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup. 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup - England 26.jpg
England at the 2014 Women's Rugby World Cup.

Until 2009 the badge and logo of England women's national teams was significantly different from that worn by men's teams. However, in 2009 – in anticipation of the merger between the RFU and RFUW – England teams adopted the men's rose.[ citation needed ]

Sue Day Captain Sue Day scores the first Try.jpg
Sue Day

England have taken part in every Women's Rugby World Cup competition, winning in 1994 and 2014 and finishing as runner-up on four other occasions.

The 1995/1996 season saw the introduction of a Home Nations Championship between England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, which England won in its inaugural year. England won the Championship every year except from the 1997/98 season when Scotland won it. France joined the competition in the 1998/99 season making it the Five Nations Championship with England achieving the Grand Slam in three successive seasons. In the 2001/02 season, Ireland rejoined the fold in preparation for the World Cup, and the competition expanded to be known as the Six Nations, since when England have finished lower than runner-up on only 2 occasions, in 2013 and 2015 respectively, and have won the title on 9 separate occasions, including in 7 consecutive tournaments between 2006 and 2012 and the Grand Slam on 8 more occasions, including 3 times in a row between 2006–2008 and 2010–2012, respectively.

Results

See List of England women's national rugby union team matches



Players

Current squad

On 26 March England announced their squad for the upcoming 2021 Women's Six Nations Championship [1]

Player Position Date of birth (age)CapsFranchise / province
Amy Cokayne Hooker (1996-07-11)11 July 1996 (aged 24)53 Harlequins
Lark Davies Hooker (1995-03-03)3 March 1995 (aged 26)28 Loughborough Lightning
Hannah Botterman Prop (1999-06-08)8 June 1999 (aged 21)20 Saracens
Shaunagh Brown Prop (1990-03-15)15 March 1990 (aged 31)18 Harlequins
Bryony Cleall Prop (1992-06-12)12 June 1992 (aged 28)1 Saracens
Victoria Cornborough Prop (1990-03-03)3 March 1990 (aged 31)56 Harlequins
Flo Long Prop 0 Worcester Warriors
Ellena Perry Prop 10 Gloucester-Hartpury
Zoe Aldcroft Lock (1996-11-19)19 November 1996 (aged 24)20 Gloucester-Hartpury
Maud Muir Lock 0 Wasps
Catherine O'Donnell Lock (1996-06-13)13 June 1996 (aged 25)16 Loughborough Lightning
Emily Robinson Lock 0 Harlequins
Abbie Ward Lock (1993-03-27)27 March 1993 (aged 27)45 Harlequins
Sarah Beckett Back row (1999-02-14)14 February 1999 (aged 22)20 Harlequins
Poppy Cleall Back row (1992-06-12)12 June 1992 (aged 28)43 Saracens
Victoria Fleetwood Back row (1990-04-13)13 April 1990 (aged 30)76 Saracens
Sarah Hunter (c) Back row (1985-09-19)19 September 1985 (aged 35)123 Loughborough Lightning
Alex Matthews Back row (1993-08-03)3 August 1993 (aged 27)40 Worcester Warriors
Harriet Millar-Mills Back row (1991-04-16)16 April 1991 (aged 29)58 Wasps
Marlie Packer Back row (1989-10-02)2 October 1989 (aged 31)74 Saracens
Claudia MacDonald Scrum-half (1996-01-04)4 January 1996 (aged 25)12 Wasps
Leanne Riley Scrum-half (1993-07-18)18 July 1993 (aged 27)40 Harlequins
Flo Robinson Scrum-half 0 Exeter Chiefs
Ellie Green Fly-half 0 Harlequins
Zoe Harrison Fly-half (1998-04-14)14 April 1998 (aged 22)27 Saracens
Megan Jones Fly-half (1996-10-23)23 October 1996 (aged 24)10 Wasps
Helena Rowland Fly-half (1999-06-30)30 June 1999 (aged 21)3 Loughborough Lightning
Amber Reed Centre (1991-03-03)3 March 1991 (aged 30)58 Bristol Bears
Emily Scarratt Centre (1990-02-08)8 February 1990 (aged 31)92 Loughborough Lightning
Lagi Tuima Centre (1998-06-16)16 June 1998 (aged 22)6 Harlequins
Jessica Breach Wing (1997-11-04)4 November 1997 (aged 23)15 Harlequins
Abigail Dow Wing (1998-09-29)29 September 1998 (aged 22)15 Wasps
Lydia Thompson Wing (1992-02-10)10 February 1992 (aged 29)46 Worcester Warriors
Beth Wilcock Wing 0 Harlequins
Merryn Doidge Fullback 0 Exeter Chiefs
Ellie Kildunne Fullback (1999-09-08)8 September 1999 (aged 21)11 Wasps
Sarah McKenna Fullback (1989-03-23)23 March 1989 (aged 32)32 Saracens

Honours

Winners (2): 1994, 2014 [2]
Runners-up (5): 1991, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2017
Winners (16): 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2017, 2019, 2020
Grand Slam (15): 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2017, 2019, 2020
Triple Crown (21): 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Winners (5): 1997, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012
Runners-up (1): 2004

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References

  1. "Red Roses Announce Squad for Upcoming 2020 Women's Six Nations". England Rugby. 26 March 2021. Retrieved 26 March 2021.
  2. James Riach. "England 21-9 Canada – Women's rugby World Cup match report". the Guardian. Retrieved 2 December 2014.