Equatorial Guinea women's national football team

Last updated
Equatorial Guinea
Nickname(s) Nzalang Nacional
Association Equatoguinean Football Federation
Confederation CAF (Africa)
Sub-confederation UNIFFAC (Central Africa)
Head coach Jean-Paul Mpila
Captain Genoveva Añonma
Most caps Genoveva Añonma (28)
Top scorer Genoveva Añonma (24)
FIFA code EQG
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First colours
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Second colours
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Third colours
FIFA ranking
Current 70 Steady2.svg(29 March 2019) [1]
Highest50 (September 2015, December 2016–March 2017)
Lowest195 (December 1998)
First international
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg  Equatorial Guinea 0–3 Gabon  Flag of Gabon.svg
(Equatorial Guinea; June 10, 2000)
Biggest win
Flag of Luxembourg.svg  Luxembourg 0–8 Equatorial Guinea  Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg
(Hostert, Luxembourg; June 18, 2011)
Biggest defeat
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 7–1 Equatorial Guinea  Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg
(Cape Coast, Ghana; November 21, 2018)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2011 )
Best resultGroup Stage (2011)
Africa Women Cup of Nations
Appearances4 (first in 2006 )
Best resultWinners (2008 & 2012)

The Equatorial Guinea women's national football team is the women's national team for Equatorial Guinea. Their nickname is the Nzalang Nacional.

Equatorial Guinea country in Africa

Equatorial Guinea, officially the Republic of Equatorial Guinea, is a country located on the west coast of Central Africa, with an area of 28,000 square kilometres (11,000 sq mi). Formerly the colony of Spanish Guinea, its post-independence name evokes its location near both the Equator and the Gulf of Guinea. Equatorial Guinea is the only sovereign African state in which Spanish is the official language. As of 2015, the country had an estimated population of 1,222,245.

Contents

They defeated South Africa 2–1 in an Olympic Games Qualifier on February 18, 2007, but lost the return leg 4–2. In the 2008 Women's African Football Championship (which they hosted), they went undefeated in Group A which featured Cameroon, Congo, and Mali. They defeated Nigeria 1–0 in the semifinal and went on to win the championship beating South Africa 2–1. They became the first nation other than Nigeria to win the Women's African Football Championship. They made their debut in an international tournament at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup, losing all three of their group stage matches against Norway, Australia and Brazil.

The South Africa national women's football team, nicknamed Banyana Banyana, is the national team of South Africa and is controlled by the South African Football Association.

2011 FIFA Womens World Cup 2011 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup was the sixth FIFA Women's World Cup competition, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It was held from 26 June to 17 July 2011 in Germany, which won the right to host the event in October 2007. Japan won the final against the United States on a penalty shoot-out following a 2–2 draw after extra time and became the first Asian team to win a senior FIFA World Cup.

Equatorial Guinea is the third women's team (out of six) from the Confederation of African Football to qualify for a FIFA Women's World Cup (Nigeria, Ghana, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, and South Africa being the others). [2]

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

The Nigeria national women's football team, nicknamed the Super Falcons, is the national team of Nigeria and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation.

Ghana womens national football team womens national association football team representing Ghana

The Ghana women's national football team is the national team of Ghana and is controlled by the Ghana Football Association. They are nicknamed the Black Queens.

Simporés' gender case

Between 2006 and 2010, Bilguissa and Salimata Simporé, a sibling duo from Burkina Faso, used to play for Equatorial Guinea - the first as a central defender and the latter as a centre forward. Beyond the mechanism by which they were naturalized, the main controversy arose regarding whether they were actually two men. They had integrated the Equatorial Guinea's squads that won the 2008 African Women's Championship and reached the second place in the 2010 African Women's Championship, which allowed Equatorial Guinea to qualify for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. Around April 2011, they were removed from national team by the Italian-born Brazilian coach Marcelo Frigerio, who had recently assumed, just a few months before participating in the World Cup. Since then, the Simporé siblings never were called-up. In 2015, Frigerio, now a former national team coach, told the Brazilian press they are in fact men. [3]

Salimata Simporé is a Burkinabé footballer who plays as a midfielder for the Burkina Faso women's national football team.

The 2008 Women's African Football Championship is of 15–29 November 2008 in Equatorial Guinea. The central African country is the first time host of the tournament. Eight national teams played in group matches and then against each other.

The 2010 Women's African Football Championship was held in South Africa from 31 October to 14 November 2010. Seven national teams joined the host nation following a series of knock-out home and away ties. This tournament was also a qualification tournament for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the two finalists, Nigeria and Equatorial Guinea qualifying for the finals in Germany.

Honours

World Cup record

World Cup Finals
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Did Not Enter-------
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Group Stage300327−5
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of France.svg 2019 Banned [4] -------
Total1/8300327−5
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
FIFA Women's World Cup history
YearRoundDateOpponentResultStadium
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Group stage29 JuneFlag of Norway.svg  Norway L 0–1 Impuls Arena, Augsburg
3 JulyFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia L 2–3 Ruhrstadion, Bochum
6 JulyFlag of Brazil.svg  Brazil L 0–3 Commerzbank-Arena, Frankfurt

Olympics record

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGA
Flag of the United States.svg 1996 Did Not Enter
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2000 Did Not Enter
Flag of Greece.svg 2004 Did Not Qualify
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2008 Did Not Qualify
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 2012 Disqualified [5]
Flag of Brazil.svg 2016 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Japan.svg 2020 Banned [6]
Total0/6000000

Performance in Africa Women's Championship

Africa Women Cup of Nations
YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGA
1991 Did Not Enter
1995 Did Not Enter
Flag of Nigeria.svg 1998 Did Not Enter
Flag of South Africa.svg 2000 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Nigeria.svg 2002 Did Not Qualify
Flag of South Africa.svg 2004 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Nigeria.svg 2006 Group Stage301259
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg 2008 Champions5500114
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 Runners-Up5311118
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg 2012 Champions5500180
Flag of Namibia.svg 2014 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Cameroon.svg 2016 Disqualified [7]
Flag of Ghana.svg 2018 Group Stage3003118
Flag of the Republic of the Congo.svg 2020 Banned [7]
Total2 Titles2113264639

Players

Latest squad

The next are some of the players who were called up for two 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations qualifying matches against Kenya in June 2018. [8]

The 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations qualification was a women's football competition which decided the participating teams of the 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations.

The Kenya women's national football team represents Kenya in women's football and is controlled by the Football Kenya Federation.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Dolores Hernández (2001-10-24) 24 October 2001 (age 17)0
131 GK Diana (1986-10-24) 24 October 1986 (age 32)10 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Malabo Kings
251 GK Lucrecia Bobuiche (1995-03-26) 26 March 1995 (age 24)10 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Estrellas de Rebola

22 DF Avelina Abang 00 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Malabo Kings
32 DF Salomé Nke (1989-06-08) 8 June 1989 (age 30)1 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Malabo Kings
42 DF Esperanza Mbang (1989-10-22) 22 October 1989 (age 29)10 Flag of Spain.svg El Ejido
92 DF Dorine Chuigoué (1988-12-29) 29 December 1988 (age 30)3 Flag of Spain.svg Logroño
192 DF Cecilia Akeng (1994-02-17) 17 February 1994 (age 25)00 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Estrellas del Sur
202 DF Pachu (1986-03-06) 6 March 1986 (age 33)10Unattached
222 DF Leocadia Nchama (1998-04-04) 4 April 1998 (age 21)00 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Deportivo Evinayong

53 MF Jacky Messomo INE (1993-03-01) 1 March 1993 (age 26)0Unattached
123 MF Fadimatou Nsongone (1999-05-12) 12 May 1999 (age 20)0
143 MF Ramona Mibuy (2002-06-28) 28 June 2002 (age 17)00 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Malabo Kings
163 MF Mayka (1987-02-12) 12 February 1987 (age 32)10 Flag of Spain.svg Dinamo Guadalajara
173 MF Blessing Diala (1989-12-08) 8 December 1989 (age 29)1 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Deportivo Evinayong
213 MF Lætitia Chapeh (1987-04-07) 7 April 1987 (age 32)0 Flag of France.svg Lille
233 MF Elena Obono (1999-11-13) 13 November 1999 (age 19)1 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Estrellas de Bomudi

84 FW Jade Boho (1986-08-30) 30 August 1986 (age 32)18 Flag of Spain.svg Logroño
104 FW Genoveva Añonma (captain) (1989-04-19) 19 April 1989 (age 30)24 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Deportivo Evinayong
114 FW Luz Milagrosa Obono (1996-04-07) 7 April 1996 (age 23)10 Flag of Spain.svg El Ejido
154 FW Chinasa Okoro (1987-12-08) 8 December 1987 (age 31)13 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Estrellas de Waiso Ipola
4 FW Eugenia Bokoka (1995-06-03) 3 June 1995 (age 24)11 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Malabo Kings
4 FW Nove (1992-08-13) 13 August 1992 (age 26)00 Flag of Spain.svg Llamoro

Notes

INE Ineligible player. [9]

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up in the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
MF Nuria Baita (1999-06-07) 7 June 1999 (age 20)00 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Malabo Kings vs. Flag of the Comoros.svg  Comoros on 26 November 2017
MF Teodora Borico 0 Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Estrellas de Rebola vs. Flag of the Comoros.svg  Comoros on 26 November 2017

Notes

    See also

    The Equatorial Guinea national football team, nicknamed Nzalang Nacional, is the national team of Equatorial Guinea and is controlled by the Equatoguinean Football Federation. It is a member of Confederation of African Football (CAF). Though Equatorial Guinea has traditionally been one of the lowest ranked teams in Africa, the recent influx of Spanish-born players of Equatoguinean heritage has strengthened the national team and resulted in some solid performances. They qualified as co-hosts for the 2012 Africa Cup of Nations. The hosting of the tournament lead to the construction of two new football stadia in the country: Estadio de Bata in Bata on the mainland, and Estadio de Malabo in Malabo. The national team managed a creditable fourth place at the 2015 Africa Cup of Nations, which was held in Equatorial Guinea.

    Téclaire Bille Esono was an Equatoguinean footballer. She played at a club level for Bellas Artes, and for the Equatorial Guinea women's national football team.

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    References

    1. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 29 March 2019. Retrieved 29 March 2019.
    2. "BBC SPORT | Football | African | Equatorial Guinea lift AWC trophy". BBC News. 2008-11-30. Retrieved 2013-08-15.
    3. De Matos, José Edgar; Bianchini, Vladimir (11 September 2015). "Técnico do São Paulo conta como barrou dois homens em seleção feminina às vésperas de Copa" [São Paulo coach tells how he banned two men in women's national team on the World Cup eve] (in Portuguese). ESPN. Retrieved 29 October 2016. Before taking the national team, I searched on the internet and I saw there was a charge that, in the African Cup of Nations, two players of the national team would be actually men. It would be a worldwide scandal I had no idea until then. I asked for the two twin sisters, who had not been presented and who were with the men's Olympic team, concentrated in a hotel. Then came two guys and they prodded me: "These are the two sisters". I replied, "You are joking, they are men". Then they trained and I asked the doctor to examine them, because I was sure that they were men. He was there and he found that they were men. Even they had been champions of the African Cup and everything else. At the time, I asked to send them back to Burkina Faso - they were naturalized - and to talk that one of them had hurt the knee and the other sister had gone along because she did not want to stay away. I cut the duo from the national team, as everyone expected their presence. When (this situation) arrived at the time of the interview, I needed to talk about that.
    4. "Equatorial Guinea expelled from FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019". FIFA.com. 5 October 2017.
    5. "E. Guinea women's team disqualified from Olympics". Usatoday.Com. 2011-07-01. Retrieved 2013-08-15.
    6. "Equatorial Guinea expelled from Women's Olympic Football Tournament 2020". FIFA.com. 11 April 2016.
    7. 1 2 "Equatorial Guinea disqualified, Mali in". CAF. 4 August 2016.
    8. @EUDLlamoro (25 May 2018). "Nove (Féminas) con la Selección Nacional Femenina de la República de Guinea Ecuatorial. Nuestra jugadora viajará a Malabo para concentrarse con su Selección y disputar la segunda ronda de clasificación para la 11th total women´s Ghana 2018 ....(1)" (Tweet). Retrieved 25 May 2018 via Twitter.
    9. "Harambee Starlets appeal against Equatorial Guinea upheld, Kenya set to grace AWCON". Football Kenya Federation. 17 October 2018. Retrieved 19 October 2018.
    Sporting positions
    Preceded by
    2006 Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg
    African Women's Champions
    2008 (First title)
    Succeeded by
    2010 Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg
    Preceded by
    2010 Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg
    African Women's Champions
    2012 (Second title)
    Succeeded by
    2014 Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg